6 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2021
  2. Jul 2020
  3. May 2020
  4. Nov 2017
    1. exists as long as the feature is in development

      When the development of a feature takes a long time, it may be useful to continuously merge from develop into the feature branch. This has the following advantages:

      • We can use the new features introduced in develop in the feature branch.
      • We simplify the integration merge of the feature branch into develop that will happen at a later point.
  5. Jan 2014
    1. Git is revolutionary because it gives you the best of both worlds. You can regularly check in changes while prototyping a solution but deliver a clean history when you’re finished. When this is your goal, Git’s defaults make a lot more sense.

      Git gets this basic division of worlds right and is a fundamental departure from other version control systems like SVN. The feature that enables all this is nearly cost-free, instantaneous branching.

      What makes this new world complex is not due to git, but instead because the world is, quite simply, complex! Good tools like git help us manage (some of) the complexity.

    2. If you’re fighting Git’s defaults, ask why. Treat public history as immutable, atomic, and easy to follow. Treat private history as disposable and malleable. The intended workflow is: Create a private branch off a public branch. Regularly commit your work to this private branch. Once your code is perfect, clean up its history. Merge the cleaned-up branch back into the public branch.

      Good defaults are sometimes hard to recognize, especially when the tool is complex.

      Questioning the defaults-- and deciding why you would keep them or change them-- is a good antidote to dismissing something due to not understanding it.

      If you can't understand why you don't like the defaults, then decide what you would choose instead and why you would change the default as it stands. Does the default make it easy to do the "right" thing AND hard to do the "wrong" thing? The second part of that statement is the most important since it might not be obvious what the "right" thing is.

      Even if you don't like the defaults, ask yourself if they continually lead you away from perils and problems that would plague you if a different set of defaults were chosen?