3 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2018
  2. Oct 2015
  3. Jun 2015
    1. warns us against equating changes in scientific understanding of a sense such as smell, what is called “osmology,” with experiential transformations. Attending to the history of smell, he tells us, is also valuable in undermining simple binary oppositions between boundaried individuals and their englobing environ- ment, the basis of Cartesian subject/object dualisms. Instead, it helps situate us in a more fluid, immersive context, where such stark oppositions are understood as themselves contingent rather than necessary

      This reminds me of our Monday discussion of Spinoza re: how expanded "scientific understanding" changes (or doesn't change) sensory experiences.