8 Matching Annotations
  1. Dec 2018
    1. Whether smiles or frowns work best may depend on what experts call “involvement” with charities – how much someone cares about charitable missions in general, how often they volunteer or participate in fundraising events and whether they regularly donate to nonprofits. Because these people already help people in need, they would like to know their donations make a difference. Sad images remind potential donors of hardships. That may make solving those problems seem insurmountable for people who are already involved with charities, thereby discouraging them from donating. Happy pictures should work better for these people because they affirm the significance of individual action and showcase the positive impact one person’s generosity can make. People who aren’t very involved with charities, on the other hand, are less easily swayed to support a given mission or to believe in its urgency. Because sad images highlight problems and the extent of unmet needs, unhappy faces should do a better job of eliciting donations from these potential donors.
  2. Jun 2016
  3. Apr 2016
    1. Responding to Current Events News: Why is it important for young children to learn about and discuss their emotional responses to news and current events?    

      This is important foundation building discussions that should be held with students.

    2. persuasive appeal

      I would want to do more research on how to teach students this concept because it is important to creating a public service announcement.

    3. PSA's can be a simple and effective way to get young students involved in civic action

      The way that PSA's are addressed here gives a possible outlet for students to make their voices heard.

    1. Creating a PSA using iMovie

      We found this page useful because it gives details how-to information that teachers and students should work with before bringing their research together to make a final product. Teachers and students should understand how the different elements of the iMovie program can make the information they want to share more effective.

    1. Conduct researchWrite informative/explanatory textParticipate in collaborative discussionsCreate artwork to support a concept

      I think that when creating a PSA with our students about floods, it was challenging because our students weren't personally impacted by flooding, so we had to think through skills carefully. It's important that students find purpose in all that you are asking them to do.

    2. Introduce students to the idea of a PSA. A PSA is designed to reach a specific group with a message that will change the group's behavior. Then ask the overarching question: How much impact can a PSA have on our behavior? 

      I know that when working on a PSA with our St. Elmo students, we didn't focus on the behavior as part of our explanation of the purpose of PSAs. If we were to create another PSA project, we might take more time into looking at impact on behavior.