3,063 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2019
    1. http://www.todd-finley.com/2017/10/01/facilitate-student-centered-instruction/ Great resource on how to facilitate student-centered instruction. It shows creative ways for students to be active instead of passive within their own education.

    2. https://www.slideshare.net/zvezdan/new-literacy-in-the-web-20-world

      Interesting concept and diagram by Daniel Churchill created to delineate how schools/educators should incorporate technology into the "new" literacy language.

    1. We should not be throwing students into the public domain to discuss sensitive topics without having conversations with them on what they might face and which of these risks they are willing to take, how they would handle it, and how they might support each other.

      This is very true. Internet safety is a must as the internet is a powerful tool but also can put the student in danger (now and later on in life). I do not remember my teachers talking to me about this. My school guidance counselors were ones who talked about this in a school setting and my mom at home.

    2. digital literacy would include in-depth questions

      Digital Literacy brings into questions in depth questions and forces the student to think of hypothetical real world situations.

    3. For example, teaching digital skills would include showing students how to download images from the Internet and insert them into PowerPoint slides or webpages. Digital literacy would focus on helping students choose appropriate images, recognize copyright licensing, and cite or get permissions,

      Difference between Digital Skills and Digital Literacy

    4. Digital literacy is not about the skills of using technologies, but how we use our judgment to maintain awareness of what we are reading and writing, why we are doing it, and whom we are addressing.

      Right! That is the core and essence of this article! And life, too - kind of :-)

    5. We should not be throwing students into the public domain to discuss sensitive topics without having conversations with them on what they might face and which of these risks they are willing to take, how they would handle it, and how they might support each other.

      Absolutely! It seems obvious to me (maybe because I'm old) but yes, it's so important! Also, not everything needs to be shouted out loud into the space, not really knowing who is listening.

    6. Instead of teaching how to use a hashtag and how to tweet and retweet, I give my students meaningful tasks to help their learning.

      Yes, that makes sense. And they will learn how to use a hashtag "on the go", as they accomplish their tasks and work on their projects.

    7. With literacies, for us, music teachers, there is always the question of what text do we want our students to read? because music is not primarily words comprised of the letters of the Latin alphabet but music notes on a 5-line staff or on the Grand Staff. So, while it is easy to agree that literacies are important, in music, we need to translate this to being literate in music-reading. For that, we need to be familiar of the available music literacy resources, and teach students to use technology to read and write (and record) music.

    8. Digital literacy is not about the skills of using technologies, but how we use our judgment to maintain awareness of what we are reading and writing, why we are doing it, and whom we are addressing.

      good summary quotation

    9. After students have the skill to use multiple platforms, I allow them the choice of which platform to use for the support they need, but I make sure they ask questions. When is it best to do a Google search versus ask a question on Twitter? Why would students tweet to a particular hashtag or person versus another? When they tweet to people from another country in another time zone, what kind of context do they need to consider? What should they add, remove, or modify in order to communicate better?

      so it seems to me that internet literacy has a lot to do with contexts and differences in platforms, etc.

    10. in addition to reminding students to use alternative text for images to support those with visual disabilities.

      This statement is incredible! It considers that there are all types of learners and abilities in the classroom, and not just one default type.

    11. Unfortunately, many focus on skills rather than literacies

      I'd say this is true. It's always been about what you can "do" with teaching technology and not nearly enough about how we should be using it.

    12. Digital skills focus on what and how. Digital literacy focuses on why, when, who, and for whom.

      Digital literacy adds that extra layer. It goes one step further to help with true comprehension

    13. Digital skills focus on what and how. Digital literacy focuses on why, when, who, and for whom.

      difference between digital skills and digital literacy

    1. Garth

      "Students need to be web literate in the future" [conclusion].

      As technology is constantly changing and improving around us, students are not always allowed//permitted to show what they can do. The students are growing up with these advancements and as educators we need to adapt to what the next generation needs (in this case we need to give them opportunities to interact with technology in the classroom).

    2. he World Wide Web has become this generation’s defining technology for literacy

      This is extremely valid. Students are more skilled with technology and electronics than they are reading a book. However, both are forms of literacy; they're just expressed through different mediums and platforms.

    3. commentary

      "The Web Literacy Map, while presented in grid form with three strands (e.g., Exploring, Building, and Connecting), recognizes literacy as a culturally defined social act." Highlight!!!

    4. commentary

      "When asked why he spends so much time learning, and then sharing for free, Garth indicated he “wanted to help others”. He was also asked how teachers could bring this into classrooms; how do teachers deal with students who learn openly on the web? Garth thought quizzically about this and responded, “Let us play, but guide us.” This guy is a genius! "Let us play, but guide us!" The only challenge is with this, for us, teacher and parents, that we have to be comfortable and familiar with what our students/kids know! So, we kind of have to be ahead of the, which is pretty challenging!

    5. Simply stated, students are often not provided with opportunities in school to practice the web literacies necessary to read, write, and participate on the web

      We have to give our students time to become not only familar but comfortable with digital literacy so that means using and applying this multiple times throughout the year and or semester.The first couple of times using it, take your time and guide them every step of the way.

    6. These efforts seek not to simply understand the web but to empower adolescents to help build a better open web.

      Many adolescents do not understand the repercussions of their internet presence. Building a better open web is beneficial to all.

    7. The World Wide Web has become this generation’s defining technology for literacy. This technology facilitates access to an unlimited amount of online information in a participatory learning space.

      I agree with this statement that the WWW has become my generation's defining technology for literacy. The internet is endless, and is able to access information in all forms. Whether you are using it to communicate with others or to research information on various subjects, the ability to use the WWW is expansive and on-demand.

    1. Essential questions help to guide the students and teacher along their path to understanding. In this UbD framework, essential questions would play a hug role.

    2. Stage 3—Plan Learning Experiences and Instruction

      stage three deals with planning appropriate lessons so that they can effectively understand the lessons

    3. Stage 2—Determine Assessment Evidence

      figure out a way to find out if the students have reached the set goal

    4. Stage 1—Identify Desired Results

      figure out what the students should know and be able to understand in the end

    5. eachers must have access to high-quality UbD curriculum materials. Weak or flawed examples convey the wrong idea of what UbD curriculum should look like, and teachers who use imperfect resourc

      how can we visualize using UbD resources and structure in underfunded and failing schools, like many here in SC? How can we determine and ensure the success of those students as well, even with limited resources?

    6. his, too, is false. Indeed, the data from released national tests show conclusively that the students have the most difficulty with those items that require understanding and transfer, not recall or recognition.

      interesting...maybe this goes to show that educators as a whole are focusing more on rote memorization and not true application of learning

    7. This perceived incompatibility is based on a flawed assumption that the only way to raise test scores is to cover those things that are tested and practice the test format.

      But is there any real way to get around this?

    8. earning you seek—the learning results (Stage 1

      clarifying learning results= first step to ensuring success of students

    9. numerous opportunities to draw inferences and make generaliza-tions for themselves (with teacher sup-port).

      I think that if teachers do everything that students lose the ability to solve problems for themselves and use their own voices

    10. isplay empathy by perceiving sensitively and walking in someone else’s shoes.

      perspective + empathy= HUGELY essential. So often it's about just performing on a test. Time to start thinking about what we learn and how it can be used to help others and solve real problems

    11. Can explain concepts, principles, and processes by putting it their own words, teaching it to others, justifying their answers, and showing their reasoning

      important in helping students find their own voice in both the academic and personal realms

    12. s to recognize that factual knowledge and skills are not taught for their own sake, but as a means to larger ends

      so important; I think that this could also lead to a greater overall interest in learning as students move forward in school

    13. ong-term performance goals—what it is we want students, in the end, to be able to do with what they have learned

      emphasis on learning that can be applied, and not just regurgitation of information/facts

    14. is planned backward from long-term, desired results through a three-stage design process (Desired Results, Evidence, a

      perhaps this is more sustainable for learning

    15. ix facets of under-standing—the capacity to explain, interpret, apply, shift perspective, empa-thize, and self-assess—can serve as indicators of understanding

      empathize is key here; I personally think the power of empathy is not "taught" or demonstrated enough in schools

    16. focus on teaching and assessing for understanding and learning transfer, and 2) design curriculum “backward” fro

      So, is this sort of like a deductive reasoning approach? i.e. figuring out the learning process and working backwards or something like that?

    1. Problem-solving

      As a social studies and math teacher, it is integral that students develop their problem-solving skills in order to learn about material both in class and in their lives.

    2. If creativity, communication, problem-solving, and collaboration are core to leadership development, practicing these skills in an online environment is the “webby” or web-based experiences of these non-cognitive skills.

      Skills that were previously learned by students in a real world situation are now capable of being transmitted to the internet. It is critical that people that also transfer their skill sets to the online world.

    3. the latest version of Mozilla’s Web Literacy Map that includes 21C skills, leadership skills and competencieswritten in language that is approachable and accessible to more people, and connected to curriculum to make it applicable for learning and teaching web literacy skills.

      Mozilla is providing both children and adults with the opportunity to learn literacy skills in new ways. This is extremely important in regards to how technology plays a role in our world.

    4. 21C leadership Skills (i.e. critical thinking, collaboration, problem solving, creativity, communication)

      21C leadership skills

      • critical thinking
      • collaboration
      • problem solving
      • creativity
      • communication It's nice to have these ideas are summarized and written down. I like organized thinking!
    5. the 4th basic foundational skill next to the three Rs—reading, writing, and arithmetic

      Yes! So true.

      1. reading
      2. writing
      3. arithmetic
      4. navigating in digital world!
    6. Approachable and accessible to diverse audiences and their needs. The map needs to be written in a language that is easy to understand, and relevant—why do web literacy skills matter to them. Applicable to interest and/or expertise. The map needs to connect to curriculum, credentials, professional development, and other resources to teach people the skills they need to engage online and offline.

      I'm having trouble with what the internet literacy map is. Can anyone define?

    7. They can evaluate web content, and identify what is useful and trustworthy.

      This is very important to learn because it will help with research projects and being able to identify websites that might not be as accurate as others.

    8. Group Contributions

      This is something my students struggle with consistently at the beginning of the year

    9. why do web literacy skills matter to them.

      Just like we connect with our students, people want to make connections relevant to them

    10. web

      The web has grown exponentially over time and is certainly being used by a vast audience

    11. Understanding basic principles, purpose, and applications of coding and programming languages.

      Personally, I never thought of myself as lacking a good foundation of web literacy. However, I am unable to code and as well lack a basic understanding of the such. I am used to visiting websites and online sources with accessibility already implemented, and am unable to see past what is presented on a website upfront, such as ways it was put together and finalized.

    12. Good online readers know the tools and strategies that can be used to search for and locate people, resources, and information. They then know how to judge the credibility of these sources.

      It is important for an online presence, especially one that makes their presence known, to be knowledgeable past the specifics they read in one singular text online. Finding further information, checking sources and coming to a personal conclusion of its credibility is very important.

    13. Using and revising keywords to make web searches to find information more efficiently

      very helpful in finding the exact information you are looking for

    14. To help people become good citizens of the web, Mozilla focuses on the following goals: 1) develop more educators, advocates, and community leaders who can leverage and advance the web as an open and public resource, and 2) impact policies and practices to ensure the web remains a healthy open and public resource for all.

      Mozilla wants to create good educators and keep the internet safe so that it can be used as an educational experience.

    1. Very helpful blog on assessment!

    2. formative and/or summative assessments, and journaling as a good opportunity for implementing one form of formative assessment.

      Yes, I agree! Journaling is a great tool! My children didn't like it when they had to do it for school but I was glad their English teacher required it.

    1. , and LinkedIn.

      I see that it's crossed out. Does it mean that you're not on LinkedIn anymore? How do I tag you?

    1. I'm slightly confused about the due dates. On the syllabus assignments for week 1 are due by 7/12, but on Peergrade they are due on 7/13 at 4:59 pm. Would you mind clarifying due dates? Since I am traveling, I want to make up for the time difference as best as possible!

    1. As you work through the information literacy skills with your students, remember that these skills are not the types of skills you can teach once and assume students will learn. They require very advanced thinking and organizing skills and therefore need multiple lessons and practice sessions. In my opinion, students are always on a scale of improvement with these skills; it is not a situation in which students either have them or don't. There are several skills on the list that I need to improve upon myself!

      it is important for students to practice these situations many times so that they are able to do their own research outside of the classroom

    2. 6. Communicate information and evaluate results (Application and Evaluation):

      the information should be conveyed effectively so that the questions, problems or ideas were answered with the appropriate information and sources

    3. 5. Use information effectively to address the problem or task (Synthesis):

      take the information found and apply it usefully to answer the questions or problems at hand

    4. 4. Organize the information (Application):

      organize the information so that it can easily be accessed for later use

    5. 3. Analyze the information found (Analysis and Evaluation):

      look at the information found and see how it can answer your questions

    6. 2. Find and identify information needed (Comprehension/Analysis):

      create questions, eventually in the end should be able to use their information to answer their questions or problems

    7. 1. Know when there is a need for information (Comprehension):

      set the basis for why you need to search for information

    1. such as analyzing and evaluating concepts, processes, procedures, and principles, rather than just remembering facts (rote learning)

      different from UbD in this way

    1. Using backward design to plan learning units and courses helps teachers and designers to reflect on what is really important for students to learn. Establishing objectives first enables them to prioritize learning activities so that students can successfully master learning goals.

      Importance of backward design

    2. Once we know what students need to be able to know and do, what needs to happen in the classroom to support that goal?

      How do teachers plan what to teach once the goal has been established?

    3. “how do we know whether or not students have achieved our learning objectives?”

      Teachers need an end goal to determine if comprehension and learning has really occurred

    4. The first step involves reflecting on the standards and curriculum map to identify the key concepts that students should know and be able to understand at the end of the unit. 

      Teachers need to know what they are teaching and where they are going

    1. If the teacher has explicitly defined the learning goals of the course, then they have a better idea of what they want the students to get out of learning activities.

      Helps the teacher anticipate student learning

    2. Wiggins and McTighe argue that backward design is focused primarily on student learning and understanding

      Focus is solely on student learning

    1. A digital footprint is all of the information a person passively leaves and actively shares about themselves online, especially on social media sites. Text, images, multimedia, cookies, browsing histories, IP addresses, passwords, and even Internet service providers all make up a person’s digital footprint.

      Good reminder for students when talking about digital skills and digital literacies

    1. Evaluate Information Found Online

      ties into English standards

    2. Virtual Collaboration

      Ideas on how to use collaboration in the classroom

    3. Digital databases are the new library. They're infinite, everywhere, and welcome visitors at all hours.

      Students can learn anywhere, at any time, through digital databases

  2. Apr 2019
    1. “You look through the 3D glasses, and you can basically walk through the structure, peeling apart parts so you can look at exactly what you want to,” said Dr. Anthony Azakie, one of the surgeons who separated the twins. He said the high-resolution visualization “helped minimize the number of surprises that we were potentially dealing with.”

      How cool!

    2. X-rays, CT scans, and MRI scans can now be turned into high-resolution 3D images in under a minute, said Sergio Agirre, chief technology officer of EchoPixel, a Mountain View, California firm whose visualization software is being used in hospitals across the U.S. “Twenty years ago, it would probably take them a week to be able to do that.”

      It is incredible how far it has come in such a short amount of time. Those of us entering the health profession must be prepared and motivated to keep up!

    3. psychologists have found VR to be good for treating post-traumatic stress disorder.

      This is awesome. Perhaps VR is good for exposure exercises and helps them recreate the traumatic experience but with a different end result? I'd be curious to learn more about how this works!

    1. Construction asks our students and teachers to focus on the power and patience employed during work process…and not just the final resultant work product.

      As a society that focuses on grades and evaluations as a measure of success, I think this is such a refreshing concept to emphasize.

    2. It may be a small designation to make, but I see a great deal of difference between the act of creation, and the sustained, informed, evaluative elements embedded in construction. Related posts:

      I love this. OCC involves digital craftsmanship, not just mindless creation.

    3. Creation can be viewed simply as the act of producing, or causing to exist.  Construction is the building or assembling of an infrastructure. Construction is equal parts inspiration and perspiration. Construction calls on creativity as well as persistence, flexibility, and revision. Construction asks our students and teachers to focus on the power and patience employed during work process…and not just the final resultant work product.

      Great way of describing difference b/n creation and construction online.

    4. During the ORC process students learn during an inquiry process and then send this message out to others using a text or tool of their choosing.

      Shows on-line reading comprehension skills while allowing student to choose how they relay he message to their peers.

    1. . Education has become more prominent topic in the public discourse of social promise. The expectations of education have been ratcheted up,

      it should be improving over the years, otherwise people arent doing their job right.

    2. We have created networks and affiliations and worked in joint projects

      its is good for students to work together.

    3. Meaning makers don’t simply use what they have been given; they are fully makers and remakers of signs and transformers of meaning.

      Remixing what they are given

    4. Three major innovations over that time have been: to focus less on the teachable specificities of meaning-system and more on the heuristics of learners’ discovering specificities amongst the enormously varied field of possibly-relevant

      Finding new ways of learning.

    5. a pedagogy of Multiliteracies may go one step further, to help create conditions of critical understanding of the discourses of work and power, a kind of knowing from which newer, more productive and genuinely more egalitarian working conditions might emerge

      Having access to learn about different types of jobs will help us to understand them better and appreciate them more.

    6. Literacy needs much more than the traditional basics of reading and writing the national language; in the new economy workplace it is a set of supple, variable, communication strategies, ever-diverging according the cultures and social languages of technologies, functional groups, types of organisation and niche clienteles.

      Students now have to know how to adapt their communication skills to people from all over the world.

    7. And these new literacies are embodied in new social practices—ways of working in new or transformed forms of employment, new ways of participating as a citizen in public spaces, and even perhaps, new forms of identity and personality

      Students are having to learn how to be different people in a technology world.

    8. the traditional emphasis on alphabetical literacy (letter sounds in words in sentences in texts in literatures) would need to be supplemented in a pedagogy of Multiliteracies by learning how to read and write multimodal texts which integrated the other modes with language.

      Students have to learn a new way of writing that is different than what they already know.

    9. 3literacy curriculum taught to a singular standard (grammar, the literary canon, standard national forms of the language), the everyday experience of meaning making was increasingly one of negotiating discourse differences. A pedagogy of Multiliteracies would need to address this as a fundamental aspect of contemporary teaching and learning.

      Learning what the grammar and language mean beyond how to read them.

    1. n the sense that each new mix becomes a meaning-making resource (affordance) for subsequent remixes, there is no “end” to remixing.

      A never ending loop

    2. These features can be applied analogously to cases of digital remix. If we claim in this case that “family” within the conventional biological taxonomy encompasses particular types of expressive media and services, then the concepts of “genus” and “species” help us to trace fertile interbreeding at both levels (see Table 1).
    3. Photoshopping remixes (e.g., Lostfrog.org)•Music and music video remixes (e.g., Danger Mouse’s “Grey Album” and the Grey video)•Machinima remixes (e.g., Machinima.com)•Moving image remixes (e.g., Animemusicvideos.org)•Original manga and anime fan art (e.g., DeviantArt.com)•Television, movie, book remixes (e.g., Fanfiction.net)•Serviceware mashups (e.g., Twittervision.com

      Good examples

    4. We remix language every time we draw on it, and we remix meanings every time we take an idea or an artefact or a word and integrate it into what we are saying and doing at the time.

      interesting to think about

    5. Lessig (2005) claims that at a very general level all of culture can be understood in terms of remix, where someone creates a cultural product by mixing meaningful elements together (e.g., ideas from different people with ideas of one’s own), and then someone else comes along and remixes this cultural artefact with others to create yet another artefact.

      Cultural remixing sometimes happens naturally

    6. By “remix” we mean the practice of taking cultural artefacts and combining and manipulating them into a new kind of creative blend.

      remix definition

    7. e remix meanings every time we take an idea or an artefact or a word and integrate it into what we are saying and doing at the time.

      An interesting way to look at it, but yes, this is definitely how we absorb information and then make our own of apply it to our own purposes.

    8. The evaluative dimension has to do with knowing how to enhance or improve the practice in order for it to better fulfill the interests of those who engage in it and who are impacted by it.

      How will your meaning make sense to others?

    9. The discourse dimension involves bringing cultural knowledge to bear on the tasks or purposes of the practice in which one is engaged; how to mobilize and co-ordinate the meaning elements.

      How are you going to bring the meaning together?

    10. The technical dimension involves knowing one’s way around the processes and tools for encoding the meaning one seeks to articulate.

      What are you going to use to make meaning?

    11. It reminds us that texts evoke interpretation on all kinds of levels that may only partially be “tappable” or “accessible” linguistically.

      People have different meanings of the same texts.

    12. Encoding means rendering texts in forms that allow them to be retrieved, worked with, and made available independently of the physical presence of an enunciator.

      Making individual meaning of something

    13. They defined practices as “socially developed and patterned ways of using technology and knowledge to accomplish tasks.” That is, when people participate in tasks that direct them “to socially recognized goals and make use of a shared technology and knowledge system, they are engaged in a social practice”

      Sharing ideas through technology

    14. In the sense that each new mix becomes a meaning-making resource (affordance) for subsequent remixes, there is no “end” to remixing. Each remix in principle expands the possibilities for further remix.

      People are always going to be remixing products as more new and exciting things are released.

    15. These include remixing clips from movies to create “faux” trailers for hypothetical movies; setting remixed movie trailers to remixed music of choice that is synchronized to the visual action; recording a series of anime cartoons and then video-editing them in synchrony with a popular music track; mixing “found” images with original images in order to express a theme or idea (with or without text added); and mixing images, animations and texts to create cartoons or satirical posters (including political cartoons and animations), to name just a few types.

      Examples of remixes

    16. We remix language every time we draw on it, and we remix meanings every time we take an idea or an artefact or a word and integrate it into what we are saying and doing at the time

      We remix things based on what inspires us.

    17. Lessig (2005) says that every single act of reading and choosing and criticizing and praising culture is in this sense remix, and it is through this general practice that cultures get made.

      We are constantly remixing products without realizing it.

    18. Lessig (2005) claims that at a very general level all of culture can be understood in terms of remix, where someone creates a cultural product by mixing meaningful elements together (e.g., ideas from different people with ideas of one’s own), and then someone else comes along and remixes this cultural artefact with others to create yet another artefact.

      New products draw inspiration from multiple existing products.

    1. it helps when their is text with the pictures for the students to be able grasp the topics.

    2. Great way of introducing how technology is taking over the way we tech literacy in classrooms.

    3. I think it's a valid concern that this will have adverse affects on literacy in future generations

    4. This is very true and something I have noticed. I think its also true that video is another way that written texts are being replaced

    5. Teachers use different modes of technology to teach students information in different ways. Each of these modes have specific semiotic meanings which can help students learn in many diverse ways.

    1. Creativity

      Notes from video

      • Copy, Transform, Combine (Remix)
      • Everything is a remix
      • Loss Aversion- strong feeling of protection of what we have or what we have made
      • we are dependent on one another- creativity comes from without not from within
    1. Learning STEM Skills by Designing

      Notes from Video

      • Making video games is like writing stories where the audience can pick their own stories
      • understand broader context of game-making skills in other areas (problem-solving skills- can relate to math, literacy, real-life situations, etc...)
      • How is my audience going to perceive my message?- being taught with online game-making but it is being missed in classrooms
      • negative comments- if feedback is more productive rather than demeaning then students can learn what they need to fix what they have done wrong rather than just quitting what they are doing
    1. Cultural Anthropologist Mimi Ito on Connected Learning, Children, and Digital Media

      Notes from the Video

      • Why do we assume kids socializing and play is not a site of learning?
      • why do we assume that schools cant have a spirit of entertainment and play as part of what they're doing?
      • Diversity in what kids were learning and doing online- friendship-driven participation (hanging out with their firends online)- site of learning social behaviors and what it means to grow up in a technological world
      • "Geeking out" participation- minority/ creative students/ interest-driven orientations- kids using the internet as environments to develop their interests and more specific forms of literacy
      • we should value all activities of online participation
      • adults have a complicated role in children's societal spaces
      • adults role in education of online safety is very important, however,
      • awareness of supporting of engagement for students to foster intelectual development using online resources- proactively engage kids in learning with online/ technological tools
      • more general perception that associates technology with the media and it is inherently a space that is hostile for learning- learning about the differences between online resources- recognizing the important actions performed when children go online (even the social area of online interactions)
      • classroom learning- giving kids access to a baseline set of standards of what they need to participate in contemporary society- reflecting on things that are going on in their lives- formal learning should work with technological learning to help students learn more
    1. Henry Jenkins on Participatory Culture

      Notes from Video-

      • Participatory Culture- a world where everyone participates in learning
      • Communities begin to produce media to share among themselves
      • Faux-cultures- share to share/ not to make money
      • media on the internet- do things because we like doing it- sharing videos and multimodal content because it is something that we like doing just wanting to share ideas
      • how do we go from participating in our cultures to participating in our political and civic structures?
      • Most people gain skill by practicing with technology **"Geek out for Democracy"- get as excited about hte future of our society as we get excited for things that we liek when using technology- making meaning for important ideas and problems in our society Interest-Driven networks- new types of citizens- directing them towards changing society and the world
      • Allowing children to do what they want on the internet is letting the children that need to be "guided" slip through the cracks
      • Instead of cutting off resources because they are considered "bad" (wikipedia) , we need to allow students to explore these types of resources so they can understand for themselves why they arent used or why they would not be considered important. They need to know "why"
    2. People are learning from each other. Media is used to share ideas more than to make money.

    3. Participatory Culture- everyone is contributing to media

    1. As we begin to integrate these online communication tools into our classrooms, we should not ignore concerns about child safety.

      It is important to educate students how to safely use the internet

    2. Someone reading this standard with a lens to the past would interpret it by teaching point of view within narratives, engaging students in discussions about the point of view held by different characters. Some-one reading this standard with a lens to the future would interpret it by teaching point of view in relation to the evaluation of a website’s reliabil-ity, where point of view is one of several important elements to consider when evaluating the reliability of information that is found online.

      i have never really thought about this but it makes sense. You never know which websites can be a reliable source.

    1. To make this approach work, teachers must be willing to “cede the floor” to the students.

      They have to let their students work through the problems together as a group and give them guidance if needed.

    1. Connected learning is realized when a young person is able to pursue a personal interest or passion with the support of friends and caring adults, and is in turn able to link this learning and interest to academic achievement, career success or civic engagement.

      A simple interest or hobby during youth can lead to greater connections later on.

    1. They do this by being sponsors of what youth are genuinely interested in — recognizing diverse interests and providing mentorship, space, and other resources.

      It is important for adults to want to and be able to connect with youth interest

  3. Mar 2019
    1. Construction calls on creativity as well as persistence, flexibility, and revision. Construction asks our students and teachers to focus on the power and patience employed during work process…and not just the final resultant work product.

      Construction is the hard work that goes into online content.

    1. Design in the sense of construction is something you do in the process of representing meanings, to oneself in sense-making processes such as reading, listening or viewing, or to the world in communicative processes such as writing, speaking or making pictures.

      How you are going to make meaning out of something.

    2. Literacy teaching is not about skills and competence; it is aimed a creating a kind of person, an active designer of meaning, with a sensibility open to differences, change and innovation

      Teaching the whole student and creating a new way of thinking.

    3. That is, meaning makers are not simply replicators of representational conventions. Their meaning-making resources may be found in representational objects, patterned in familiar and thus recognisable ways. However, they rework these objects. Meaning makers don’t simply use what they have been given; they are fully makers and remakers of signs and transformers of meaning.

      They are taking what they have been given and using it in a way that is relevant to their lives.

    4. Rather than address the specificities meaning-making systems (which we tended to do earlier), we propose that the conventions of any domain be addressed with open-ended questions about meaning, such as:•Representational: What do the meanings refer to?•Social: How do the meanings connect the persons they involve?•Structural: How are the meanings organised?•Intertextual: How do the meanings fit into the larger world of meaning?•Ideological: Whose interests are the meanings skewed to serve?
    5. The Multiliteracies view of design has three aspects: Available Designs (found representational forms); the Designing one does (the work you do when you make meaning, how you appropriate and revoice and transform Available Designs); and The Redesigned (how, through the act of Designing, the world and the person are transformed)
    6. pedagogy of Multiliteracies, in contrast, requires that the enormous role of agency in the meaning making process be recognised, and in that recognition, it seeks to create a more productive, relevant, innovative, creative and even perhaps emancipatory, pedagogy. Literacy teaching is not about skills and competence; it is aimed a creating a kind of person, an active designer of meaning, with a sensibility open to differences, change and innovation. The logic of Multiliteracies is one which recognises that meaning making is an active, transformative process, and a pedagogy based on that recognition is more likely to open up viable lifecourses for a world of change and diversity.
    7. n a pedagogy of Multiliteracies, all forms of representation, including language, should be regarded as dynamic processes of transformation rather than processes of reproduction.
    1. •Photoshopping remixes (e.g., Lostfrog.org)•Music and music video remixes (e.g., Danger Mouse’s “Grey Album” and the Grey video)•Machinima remixes (e.g., Machinima.com)•Moving image remixes (e.g., Animemusicvideos.org)•Original manga and anime fan art (e.g., DeviantArt.com)•Television, movie, book remixes (e.g., Fanfiction.net)•Serviceware mashups (e.g., Twittervision.com
    2. a very general level all of culture can be understood in terms of remix, where someone creates a cultural product by mixing meaningful elements together (e.g., ideas from different people with ideas of one’s own), and then someone else comes along and remixes this cultural artefact with others to create yet another artefact.
    3. By “remix” we mean the practice of taking cultural artefacts and combining and manipulating them into a new kind of creative blend.
    1.  Is the information easy to use? Limit the number of messages, use plain language, and focus on action.3, 4 Keep it simple. The number of messages will depend on the information needs of the intended users. As a general guideline, use no more than four main messages. Give the user specific actions and recommendations. Clearly state the actions you want the person to take. Focus on behavior rather than the underlying medical principles. Use familiar language and an active voice. Avoid long or run-on sentences. Organize similar information into several smaller groups. Many of the same plain language techniques that make the written word understandable also work with verbal messages, such as avoiding jargon and using everyday examples to explain technical or medical terms the first time they are used. For more information on plain language, visit www.plainlanguage.gov. Supplement instructions with pictures. Individual learning styles differ. For many people, visuals are a preferred style, especially for technical information.3 Simple line drawings can help users understand complicated or abstract medical concepts. Make sure to place images in context. When illustrating internal body parts, for example, include the outside of the body. For print communication, use captions or cues to point out key information.3 Show the main message on the front of the materials. Use visuals that help convey your message. (Don't just “decorate,” as this will distract users.) Make visuals culturally relevant and use images that are familiar to your audience. Back to Top Make written communication look easy to read.3-5 Use at least 12-point font. Avoid using all capital letters, italics, and fancy script. Keep line length between 40 and 50 characters. Use headings and bullets to break up text. Be sure to leave plenty of white space around the margins and between sections. Improve the usability of information on the Internet. Remember Refer to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Policies for Federal Public Websites for further guidance. Studies show that people cannot find the information they seek on Web sites about 60 percent of the time.6 This percentage may be significantly higher for persons with limited literacy skills. Many of the elements that improve written and oral communication can be applied to online information, including using plain language, large font, white space, and simple graphics.7 Other elements are specific to the Internet. These include: Enhancing text with video or audio files Including interactive features and personalized content Using uniform navigation Organizing information to minimize searching and scrolling6 Giving users the option to navigate from simple to complex information A critical way to make information on the Internet more accessible to persons with limited literacy and health literacy skills is to apply user-centered design principles and conduct usability testing. Usability is a measure of several factors that affect a user's experience interacting with a product, such as a Web page. These factors include: How fast can the user learn how to use the site? How fast can the user accomplish tasks? Can the user remember how to use the site the next time he or she visits? How often do users make mistakes? How much does the user like the site? To learn more about usability, visit www.usability.gov.

      All of these are questions doctors and nurses should be asking themselves when sharing information.

    1. Health information can overwhelm even persons with advanced literacy skills. Medical science progresses rapidly. What people may have learned about health or biology during their school years often becomes outdated or forgotten, or it is incomplete. Moreover, health information provided in a stressful or unfamiliar situation is unlikely to be retained.

      Exactly! Health information requires more specific knowledge.

    1. Teacher modeling in the beginning of the phase gives way to student modeling in the latter half. Students take responsibility for teaching their peers a variety of online reading comprehension strategies. Instruction also begins to move from search skills to critical evaluation and synthesis skills. (

      Students taking responsibility in there education by collaboration and teaching themselves and others the material

    2. Reciprocal teaching revolves around four global comprehension strategies: predicting, questioning, clarifying, and summarizing. The teacher explains these strategies to small groups using a shared text, first modeling their use, and then asking students to lead the groups. Internet reciprocal teaching builds on the same principles; however, the teacher first instructs students in a whole-class setting with each person constructing his or her own text while building the online reading comprehension strategies of questioning, locating, evaluating, synthesizing, and communicating.

      It is import for teachers to explain to student how to use something but it also important for students to play and figure out something with their peers in a group or on there own

    3. During Phase 3, students work both individually and in small groups at using strategies and skills from the previous phases to develop lines of inquiry around curricular topics.

      In the last phase, students work in small groups to develop their inquiry

    4. Phase 2 is a collaborative phase during which both teachers and students conduct think-aloud demonstrations and minilessons

      In the second phase of internet inquires, students and teachers come together to evaluate the information that students have found online.

    5. questioning, locating, evaluating, synthesizing, and communicating.

      the online reading comprehension strategies include questioning, evaluating, syntehsizing, and communicating

    6. The teacher explains these strategies to small groups using a shared text, first modeling their use, and then asking students to lead the groups.

      in order for teachers to use the global comprehension stragies, they must introduce them to students and let students branch out into small groups

    7. Reciprocal teaching revolves around four global comprehension strategies: predicting, questioning, clarifying, and summarizing.

      the four global comprehension strategies are predicitng, questioning, clarifying, and summarizing

    8. In addition, the rise of the Internet means that teachers must shift how they teach reading and writing (

      In order for teachers to adapt to the forever changing digital age, they must change how they teach their subjects to better incorporate technology and internet inquiries

    9. These Cs include such skills as creativity, communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and comprehension.

      The 5 "C's of change" for the 21st century

    10. Students needed a sextant, a tool for navigation, to guide them.

      students need a tool for navigation to help guide their inquiry online and promote deeper thinking

    11. Creativity: Students use divergent-thinking skills to generate their own questions and keywords for online searches. Their final projects require them to creatively express their own point of view. Communication: Students share what they learn as they work in small groups and with the whole class. They communicate with a wider audience by posting on a class blog. Collaboration: Students create collaborative knowledge through Internet inquiry and social interactions. They comment on one another's work using technologies such as VoiceThread and support one another through instant messaging. Critical Thinking: When using the Internet, students build the text they read, choosing which links to follow and which to ignore. The nonlinear nature of online reading helps support critical thinking. Students also learn to question the perspective and bias of online sources. Comprehension: Students learn important online reading skills, such as how to distinguish news articles from blog posts and editorials. They carefully read texts they encounter online to understand and evaluate different perspectives.

      5 C's overview

    12. Students take responsibility for teaching their peers a variety of online reading comprehension strategies.

      Helps build confidence in their own web literacy skills when they have to share it with others .

    13. Patricia Reilly Giff's Pictures of Hollis Woods

      I love this book so much

    14. Boolean search terms.

      AND, OR and NOT can refine your search by combining or limiting terms. Boolean logic is a system of showing relationships between sets by using the words AND, OR, and NOT. (The term Boolean comes from the name of the man who invented this system, George Boole. https://library.uaf.edu/ls101-boolean

    15. the teacher first instructs students in a whole-class setting with each person constructing his or her own text while building the online reading comprehension strategies of questioning, locating, evaluating, synthesizing, and communicating.

      Helps them become both web consumers and web creators.

    16. By creating a curriculum that allows for problem-based inquiry learning, high-level discussion, and collaboration. One approach, Internet reciprocal teaching, involves problem-based tasks in which readers create their own text. This provides students a path for navigating the Cs of change. (See "Internet Reciprocal Teaching Promotes the Five Cs.")

      Allows them to develop these skills through hands on experience.

    17. These Cs include such skills as creativity, communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and comprehension.

      The 5 C's

    18. No one gave students a map for Internet inquiry. Students needed a sextant, a tool for navigation, to guide them.

      this would be helpful but sadly it doesn't exist .

    19. Deliberately teaching online reading and research skills is one way to keep students from foundering on their way to the future.

      If they don't learn these skills, they may nt being using the internet to it's full potential or may be misusing it

    20. We then demonstrated how to use basic Boolean search terms.

      one method of web searching with a purpose

    21. Cs of change" that the 21st century has brought us. These Cs include such skills as creativity, communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and comprehension.

      c's of change; skills needed to navigate the internet

    22. We discussed the differences among news articles, blogs, and editorials. Then the students had to post comments on the classroom blog about whether they thought the zoo or the patron was at fault for the attack

      Is there any bias in the articles? This could sway the way that the articles portray the information.

    23. Another technique is to create Internet scavenger hunts connected to the curriculum. On completing the challenge, students share their searching strategies with the class

      Great way to incorporate search engine skills! This helps to keep students engaged and interested in learning about how to navigate the internet properly.

    24. They chose real-life issues that they face every day as at-risk youth. Sure, the school dress code and the school lunch were favorites, but many students chose such crucial issues as how to stop bullying, reducing drug use in school, stopping domestic and relationship violence, and keeping students in school

      By allowing student to choose their own topics, they will delve into the issues revolving their lives. It is important to get them to ask these questions and focus on resolving these issues because it shows them that just because a problem persists, it does not mean that there is no solution.

    25. During Phase 3, students work both individually and in small groups at using strategies and skills from the previous phases to develop lines of inquiry around curricular topics. This type of project requires clear questions, multiple reliable sources, citations, and a final product that communicates that information to others.

      Student-centered learning aids in the student taking the responsibility of the own learning. By allowing students to question on their own about a topic, they are producing their own thought process on how to acquire knowledge.

    26. Making meaning during online reading requires students to combine multiple streams of information from text, video, and audio sources.

      Multimodal learning to help students understand the content and how to relay the information that they learned. With many different facets of information retrieval, students can help to reinforce the information that they are learning.

    27. Students take responsibility for teaching their peers a variety of online reading comprehension strategies. Instruction also begins to move from search skills to critical evaluation and synthesis skills

      In this model, students will help to teach their classmates so that all students can know and better understand the content. When students teach their peers, they are reinforcing the information they already know and they are helping their classmates to better understand the information that they may not fully comprehend yet.

    28. Phase 1 centers on computer basics, word processing skills, Web searching, navigation basics, and e-mail

      Basic skills that students should first know when navigating the internet. Some may already have these skills but it is important to still teach them so that they can have a full understanding of the information they are trying to find.

    29. Reciprocal teaching revolves around four global comprehension strategies: predicting, questioning, clarifying, and summarizing. The teacher explains these strategies to small groups using a shared text, first modeling their use, and then asking students to lead the groups

      Using reciprocal teaching to explain to students about internet use and information finding. These types of teaching methods refer to understanding a text of information, which helps when searching for information. Internet reciprocal teaching takes this pedagogy to the next step by including internet literacy and student-based learning techniques.

    30. These Cs include such skills as creativity, communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and comprehension

      The C's of Change

    31. "You do not simply answer these questions. It is not answer number one; then answer number two. These are questions you keep in the back of your mind as you work."

      Internet inquiry is not based on a simple "question and answer" framework, to use the internet to research students have to keep in mind the questions and build up information that they find from credible sources to explain the topic that they are researching.

    1. To improve quality of care and reduce disparities, patients’ literacy skills must be acknowledged and addressed within the health care setting. The National Call to Action to Promote Health Literacy, released by the CDC in May, 2010, views limited health literacy as a public health problem (section1) and has articulated 7 goals to deliver person-centered health information and services.

      Good argument.

    1. Open learning, also known as open education, can be defined as a set of practices, resources, and scholarship that are openly accessible, free to use and access, and to re-purpose.

      open learning defined

    2. Open learning, also known as open education, can be defined as a set of practices, resources, and scholarship that are openly accessible, free to use and access, and to re-purpose.

      good definition of open learning

    3. Open learning, also known as open education, can be defined as a set of practices, resources, and scholarship that are openly accessible, free to use and access, and to re-purpose.

      This is essential to expanding education and getting the whole picture.

    4. Open learning, also known as open education, can be defined as a set of practices, resources, and scholarship that are openly accessible, free to use and access, and to re-purpose.

      Having access to resources that are able to be re-purposed offer educators and students to use the SAMR model and modify or redefine whatever the learning material is.

    5. Two heads are always better than one, and it is a good idea to share, compare and contrast ideas with other teachers who may be in other districts, towns, states, and even countries from you.

    6. this is a reoccurring worry we have we using technology in the classroom

    7. Making sure reposted media on your website fits legal licensing standards is important to remember.

    8. Open learning, also known as open education, can be defined as a set of practices, resources, and scholarship that are openly accessible, free to use and access, and to re-purpose.

      I can see how this concept is growing with the increased use of technology and the accessibility provided by the internet.

    1. “credibility” and “relevance”…but they do understand words like “truthful” and “useful.”

      very important statement for student understanding

    2. Students collaboratively (with the instructor) identify an area of interest and co-construct a driving question to guide inquiry

      teachers step in to help students come up with a subject that interests them and create a driving question to help guide their research

    3. student interest driven

      This is a very important statement because every project that students do will be easier for them to complete if it geniuenly interests them

    4. As students expand beyond the WebQuest, the next step is to engage in an Internet Inquiry Project.

      After students develop WebQuests, they should engage in an Internet Inquiry Project

    5. Student engage in online content construction by synthesizing what they have learned and selecting the best digital text or tool before sharing this answer.

      I think it's important to help students interpret what they read and to guide them in becoming web content creators themselves.

    6. he Internet Inquiry Project is an online research project that helps students develop the important digital knowledge and skills needed as they build their web literacies.

      It's important that students are well versed in how to explore the web and do research in order to obtain accurate knowledge.

    7. The design, focus, and length of the Internet Inquiry Project should be determined by your student learning objectives, as well as your own technological, pedagogical, and content area knowledge (TPACK) and objectives

      To develop lesson plans that use the internet as a learning tool, we must tailor it to our students needs. We have to find out what our students already know and use that as a base to start our lesson plans. If things do not end up working out in a lesson, then we have to fix it so that all of our students can understand the information we are teaching them.

    1. Finally, each online tool regularly is updated; each time this happens new affordances appear, requiring addi-tional skills and strategies. It is clear that the nature of literacy regularly and continuously changes in online spaces.

      When a website is updated, it comes along with having to learn the new updates.

    2. To be ready for college, workforce training, and life in a technologi-cal society, students need the ability to gather, comprehend, evaluate, synthesize, and report on information and ideas, to conduct original research in order to answer questions or solve problems, and to analyze and create a high volume and extensive range of print and nonprint texts in media forms old and new. The need to conduct research and to produce and consume media is embedded into every aspect of today’s curriculum.

      This is why we have required computer classes

    3. First, they focus directly on information use and learning, so these skills are central to education at all levels. Second, the ability to read and use online information effectively to solve problems defines success in both life and work

      super essential both in and out of the classroom

    4. In a context in which anyone may publish anything, higher-level thinking skills such as critical evaluation of source material become especially important online

      you never know how accurate the things we consume online actually are. There's too much fake news

    5. 1) reading to identify important questions, (2) reading to locate information, (3) reading to evaluate information criti-cally, (4) reading to synthesize information, and (5) reading and writing to communicate information.

      important skill set

    6. How can we develop adequate understanding when the very object that we seek to study continuously changes?

      this could open doors to new subject matter that may not have been taught before.

    7. our students are already “digital natives,” skilled in online literacies (Prensky, 2001)

      This is true, but they aren't proficient in the academic side of online literacy, more so just they social media aspect.

    8. Finally, each online tool regularly is updated; each time this happens new affordances appear, requiring addi-tional skills and strategies. It is clear that the nature of literacy regularly and continuously changes in online spaces.

      Once you think you have an understanding of something, it completely changes

    9. Most importantly, it is reshap-ing the nature of literacy education, providing us with many new and exciting opportunities for our classrooms

      I agree. There are now so many new resources to teach with, even just compared to when I was in high school 3 years ago.

    10. The Internet is a very disruptive technology (Christensen, 1997), alter-ing traditional elements of our society from newspapers to music

      never really thought about it this way, but it makes sense

    11. Studies show that stu-dents lack critical evaluation skills when reading online (Bennet, Maton, & Kervin, 2008; Forzani & Maykel, 2013; Graham & Metaxas, 2003) and that they are not especially skilled with reading to locate information online (Kuiper & Volman, 2008).

      Some areas of improvement with literacy.

    12. Each requires additional reading and/or writing skills to take full advantage of its affordances. In addition, new tools for lit-eracy will appear on the Internet tomorrow with additional, New Litera-cies required to use them effectively.

      The definition of literacy changes as new advancements come along.

    1. The Wayback Machine records snapshots of a website's pages throughout its history. Those snapshots gather some or all of the pages on the website.

      overview of what it does

    1. potential to fuel collaboration, encourage the improvement of available materials, and aid in the dissemination of best practices.

      could be a really cool way teachers from all over can collaborate. Also, could potentially help streamline what students are being taught in schools and make curriculums more universal