22 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2018
    1. Her interview with a realtor confirmed her belief that bike infrastructure (like the Midtown Greenway) causes the value of nearby properties to rise. She also talked to the board of Twin Cities Greenways, and consulted the work of Melissa Checker, who studies the appropriation of eco-friendly language by high-end developers.

  2. Feb 2017
    1. northeast Portland

      Here's a history of this the process of gentrification that Linda Christensen uses in here gentrification curriculum: BLEEDING ALBINA: A HISTORY OF COMMUNITY DISINVESTMENT, 1940–2000

    2. "Thank God for gentrification," one of the men yelled into a megaphone. "Someone had to clean up the neighborhood."

      The three men yelling this at Black Lives Matter demonstrators must not have learned their lessons in Linda Christensen's English class at Jefferson High School http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Resources/Journals/EJ/1052-nov2015/EJ1052Focus.pdf

  3. Nov 2016
  4. atlspaceplacerhetf16.robinwharton.net atlspaceplacerhetf16.robinwharton.net
    1. econcentration effortsare geared towards either dispersing poor people to less-poor communities or attractinghigher-income residents to low-income neighborhoods.

      This descriptions of efforts by cities to diminish poverty is the same as gentrification, which has both positive and negative impacts on lower-income individuals and families. As presented by Max in class, the introduction of Krog Street Market to a certain community increased the cost of living in that neighborhood, driving out this populace.

    1. For this report, an initial test determined a tract was eligible to gentrify if its median household income and median home value were both in the bottom 40th percentile of all tracts within a metro area at the beginning of the decade. To assess gentrification, growth rates were computed for eligible tracts’ inflation-adjusted median home values and percentage of adults with bachelors’ degrees.

      define the variables/tests

    2. The District is home to some of the county’s fastest-gentrifying communities.

      It is amazing to see the areas of gentrification in the 1990s compared to now on this map.

      http://www.governing.com/gov-data/washington-dc-gentrification-maps-demographic-data.html

    3. Neighborhoods gentrifying since 2000 recorded population increases and became whiter, with the share of non-Hispanic white residents increasing an average of 4.3 percentage points. Meanwhile, lower-income neighborhoods that failed to gentrify experienced slight population losses and saw the concentration of minorities increase

      Racial impact on gentrification.

    4. In the District of Columbia, for example, 54 neighborhoods were found to have gentrified since 2000. Back in the 1990s, just five neighborhoods had gentrified in a decade when the city was dubbed the nation’s “murder capital.” 

      Distinction between the 1990s and now. It had been known as the "murder capital" or dodge city, yet know it is on its way to being completely gentrified.

    5. Portland, OR 58.1% 36 26 80 142 Washington, DC 51.9% 54 50 75 179 Minneapolis, MN 50.6% 39 38 39 116

      Fascinating to look at the different statistics for gentrification across the US.

    6. Compared to lower-income areas that failed to gentrify, gentrifying Census tracts recorded increases in the non-Hispanic white population and declines in the poverty rate.

      Not beneficial to minorities or poor... Not very surprising.

    7. Gentrification greatly accelerated in several cities. Nearly 20 percent of neighborhoods with lower incomes and home values have experienced gentrification since 2000, compared to only 9 percent during the 1990s.
    8. Gentrification still remains rare nationally, with only 8 percent of all neighborhoods reviewed experiencing gentrification since the 2000 Census.

      Surprising that it is not more common. You always here about how cities are being gentrified, yet it only occurs in 8% of neighborhoods.

  5. Jun 2016
    1. I didn’t know any of our middle-class neighbors, black or white, who sent their children to one of these schools. They had managed to secure seats in the more diverse and economically advantaged magnet schools or gifted-and-talented programs outside our area, or opted to pay hefty tuition to progressive but largely white private institutions

      This makes me want to take the time to figure out the argument that I heard explained on the Brian Lehrer Show about six months ago http://www.wnyc.org/story/neighborhoods-are-integrated-while-schools-stay-segregated/ Here's the study they are talking about http://www.centernyc.org/segregatedschools and the basic thesis is that even while neighborhoods are integrated (or -- as this author says about Bedford-Stuyvesant "rapidly gentrifying"), schools remain segregrated. I'm assuming that it's because middle class (and White?) parents who might be moving into segregated neighborhoods are still not sending their children to schools in those neighborhoods.

  6. May 2016
    1. news articles on neighbor-hood displacements over the years to get students thinking further about underlying issues that affected them.

      Gentrification -- or housing patterns -- is a great topic to explore with youth, precisely because it is both in the news and the stories represent historical patterns that can be studied deeply. Similarly, this is a teaching moment that can be about what is happening in the lives of youth in our classes and built on the strategies of placed-based education and writing. I started to pull some of this together around Renee Watson's Youth Adult novel Close To Home and Linda Christensen's work with the Oregon Writing Project and beyond with the Roots of Gentrification. See http://youthvoices.net/home1 I'd love to finish some of this curriculum development -- but only when teaching the material with students, not in the abastract.

  7. Nov 2015
    1. Four-fifths of the city lay submerged as residents frantically signaled for help from their rooftops and thousands were stranded at the Superdome, a congregation of the desperate and poor.

      It's hard to remember how much of New Orleans was devastated and for how long.

  8. Aug 2015
    1. As of 2013, there were nearly 100,000 fewer black residents than in 2000, their absences falling equally across income levels. The white population decreased by about 11,000, but it is wealthier.

      Perhaps New Orleans is a global symbol of what Naomi Klein has called Disaster Apartheid Shock Doctrine by Naomi Klein

    2. American dysfunction and government negligence

      "Bush doesn't care about Black people," made clear the neglect that we felt immediately, but it was only later the I became aware of the years of incompetence and broken systems that led to the storm surge doing so much damage. Immediately -- and for me to this day -- New Orleans was a symbol of carbon corporate power. Where is BP in this sentence in the Times?

  9. Jan 2015
    1. Yet policymakers all too often fail to fit remedies to the circumstances. Rust Belt cities require set-asides just like San Francisco, while Bay Area institutions such as Stanford hand out generous housing subsidies to new faculty, a measure that only serves to drive housing prices up, instead of searching for ways to increase supply.

      Yet the Bay Area rhetoric most often heard is that supply-side solutions will not succeed.

    2. Expressing concern about “gentrification” in those cities may simply be another way of expressing concern about rising housing prices.

      Those worried about gentrification may not actually be concerned about the lowest-income residents. They are concerned about themselves.

    3. I need a word for this: "the endless hand-wringing about bullshit problems which hinders discussion of real problems".

    4. One of the first people to explore this question in a sophisticated way was University of Washington economist Jacob Vigdor. In 2002, Vigdor examined what had happened in Boston between 1974 and 1997, a period of supposedly intense gentrification. But Vigdor found no evidence that poor people moved out of gentrifying neighborhoods at a higher than normal rate. In fact, rates of departure from gentrifying neighborhoods were actually lower.

      Lower!