6 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2019
    1. prejudices

      Prejudices come back again--Hume, Vico, Astell...those are three that in recent memory have used this word (or the intros to them did).

      Is it possible to have the situation that Sheridan refers to here, one without prejudice entirely? Even in a new subject, couldn't one jump to conclusions or make assumptions about (to pre-judge) it?

    1. Model on tl,t,t� which to form our selves. Or ruther to imitate

      Imitation makes another appearance, which (as mholder pointed out with Vico) "was one of the dominant methods of instruction in rhetoric up through the Enlightenment".

      I think imitation is particularly important in terms of women's education, as women often would have little to go by but a model, specifically one observed (over ones read about).

    1. seems

      Look at the seed he is sowing right there.

    2. our scholars arc nol compelled to restrict their competence to the knowledge of one or another author, but can master a multiple, diversified, almost boundless domain of culture.

      As an autodidact, he would know!

    1. hound up in human reason. pas­sion, and imagination; that human beings function in social groups an<l arc limited by historical circumstances

      Sounds like the human-measure doctrine and casuistry. Vico = 18th C sophist. He's a bit dour, though:

  2. Feb 2017
    1. Scientists will never reach a consensus with Flat Earthers or with those who believe the Earth was created in 4004 bce. Nor do they need to. The best that science can provide is a clearly specified degree of consensus among scientists who base their conclusions on empirical data. Efforts to reach consensus on important questions have been discouraged due to the influence of philosophers of science who emphasize conflicting research programs, paradigm shifts, and scientific revolutions (Franklin 2009; Stove 1982).

      "In our days, we keep away from the art of inventing arguments, and think that this skill is of no use. We hear people affirming that, if individuals are critically endowed, it is succinct to teach them a certain subject, and they will have the capacity to discover whether there is any truth in that subject. It is claimed that, without any previous training in the ars topica, any person will be able to discern the probabilities which surround any ordinary topic, and to evaluate them by the same standard employed in the stifling of truth. But who can be sure that he has taken into consideration every feature of the subject on hand'! The most eulogizing epithet that can he given to a speech is that it is "comprehensive": praise is due to the speaker who has left nothing untouched, and has omitted nothing from the argument, nothing which may be missed by his listeners." (Vico 869)