36 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Encourage imitation. By seeing imitation as intellectually empty and even fraudulent, we neglect one of the most powerful learning tools we have. How might we build imitation more deliberately into our pedagogy? How might we use an intentionally-designed apprenticeship model for more types of learning?

      The history of rhetoric is littered with suggestions to imitate. Early commonplace book handbooks encouraged it heavily.

      Cross reference: https://hyp.is/mCsl9voQEeuP3t8jNOyAvw/maggieappleton.com/echo-narcissus

    2. Imitation, Paul says, allows us to think with other people’s brains. It is a key technique — globally and transhistorically — for learning, from babies imitating parents to apprentices imitating masters. And yet imitation is seen in contemporary US society, and schooling especially, as so debased that it is frequently punished. In fact, if Paul is correct (and I think she is, and have thought so for years when teaching writing), we should build imitation into many more of our lesson plans.

      On the importance of imitation...

      I'm reminded of Benjamin Franklin imitating what he thought were good writers to make his own writing more robust.

      See: https://via.hypothes.is/https://www.gutenberg.org/files/20203/20203-h/20203-h.htm

      Maybe the aphorism: "Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery," should really be "Imitation is the sincerest form of learning."

  2. Aug 2021
    1. Imitation did not mean exact reproduction; rather, words could be added or substracted, and a passage reworked in order to express the same or a contrary view (52)

      Tangential to my particular study, but consider the idea of Donald Trump as being an imitator within this framing. He would frequently float ideas at rallies (cf. George Lakoff) to see what would get a rise from the crowed and riff off of that. In some sense he's not leading, yet imitating the mobs.

  3. Mar 2021
    1. It seems the game is trying to be similar to Monkey Island, which isn't necessarily a bad thing. Imitation is sometimes considered flattery afterall.
  4. Sep 2020
  5. May 2020
  6. Feb 2019
    1. Model on tl,t,t� which to form our selves. Or ruther to imitate

      Imitation makes another appearance, which (as mholder pointed out with Vico) "was one of the dominant methods of instruction in rhetoric up through the Enlightenment".

      I think imitation is particularly important in terms of women's education, as women often would have little to go by but a model, specifically one observed (over ones read about).

    1. imilalc,

      He mentions imitation twice in this paragraph, which was one of the dominant methods of instruction in rhetoric up through the Enlightenment. What does imitation look like today? I'm curious as to what that might (or does) look like.

  7. Apr 2017
  8. Mar 2017
    1. Such iter-ability-(iter, again, probably comes from itara, other in Sanskrit, and everything that follows can be read as the working out of the logic that ties repetition to alterity) structures the mark of writing itself, no matter what particular type of writing is involved (whether pictographical, hieroglyphic, ideographic, phonetic, alphabetic, to cite the old categories).
    1. The commentary-principle limits the chance-element in discourse by the play of an identity which would take the form of repetition and sameness.
    2. The infinite rippling of commentaries is worked from the inside by the dream of a repe-tition in disguise: at its horizon there is perhaps nothing but what was at its point of departure-mere recitation.
  9. Feb 2017
  10. Nov 2013
    1. That is to say, this conceptual edifice is an imitation of temporal, spatial, and numerical relationships in the domain of metaphor.

      Interesting.

    2. The free intellect copies human life, but it considers this life to be something good and seems to be quite satisfied with it.
    3. It continually manifests an ardent desire to refashion the world which presents itself to waking man, so that it will be as colorful, irregular, lacking in results and coherence, charming, and eternally new as the world of dreams
    4. considers the entire universe in connection with man: the entire universe as the infinitely fractured echo of one original sound-man; the entire universe as the infinitely multiplied copy of one original picture-man

      Man sees himself in everything

    5. To begin with, a nerve stimulus is transferred into an image: first metaphor. The image, in turn, is imitated in a sound: second metaphor. And each time there is a complete overleaping of one sphere, right into the middle of an entirely new and different one

      Deaf man metaphor, we can never know the original or truth, but approximate

    6. What is a word? It is the copy in sound of a nerve stimulus
    7. This art of dissimulation reaches its peak in man. Deception, flattering, lying, deluding, talking behind the back, putting up a false front, living in borrowed splendor, wearing a mask, hiding behind convention, playing a role for others and for oneself-in short, a continuous fluttering around the solitary flame of vanity-is so much the rule and the law among men that there is almost nothing which is less comprehensible than how an honest and pure drive for truth could have arisen among them.

      We are merely trying to fill roles and hide our true selves because we recognize our insufficiency.

  11. Oct 2013
    1. But if a man desire to speak not only with wisdom, but with eloquence also (and assuredly he will prove of greater service if he can do both), I would rather send him to read, and listen to, and exercise himself in imitating, eloquent men, than advise him to spend time with the teachers of rhetoric
    1. Therefore, the first consideration for the student is to understand what he proposes to imitate and why it is excellent.

      Imitation is important and students must choose the best to imitate.

    2. they yet never fully attain to his force or fertility of language

      Those we imitate act as the fertile soil we grow from

    3. rather one of those images of Epicurus, which he says are perpetually flying off from the surfaces of bodies
    4. Moreover, everything that resembles something else must necessarily be inferior to that of which it is a copy, as the shadow to the substance, the portrait to the natural face, and the player's acting to the real feeling

      It sounds like Plato's cave metaphor

    5. imitation is not sufficient of itself,

      Requires ingenuity and imagination. We must do something more with what we imitate

    6. Our minds must be directed to the imitation of all their excellences, for it cannot be doubted that a great portion of art consists in imitation, since, though to invent was first in order of time and holds the first place in merit, it is of advantage to copy what has been invented with success.

      Imitation is a continual theme throughout this work

    1. it is evident that commencement of the art arose from speaking, followed by imitation, and, last of all, diligent exercise in writing

      Writing is the last and highest in the progression

    1. Such is the practice of actors who do not pronounce exactly as we speak in common conversation, for such pronunciation would be devoid of art; nor do they depart far from nature, as by such a fault imitation would be destroyed; but they exalt the simplicity of familiar discourse with a certain scenic grace.
    1. The next symptom is imitation, for that is an indication of a teachable disposition, but with this provision: that it express merely what it is taught, and not a person's manner or walk, for instance, or whatever may be remarkable for deformity.

      imitation, mimesis