11 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2019
    1. Any local, state or national government, or any political machine, in order to live, must give the people assurance that they can express their will freely and that their votes will be counted. The most powerful machine cannot exist without the support of the people. Political bosses and political machinery can be good, but the minute they cease to express the will of the people, their days are numbered.

      A very powerful sentiment aligned with the US Declaration of Independence.

  2. Mar 2014
    1. When his words were brought back to the Athenians, they would not consent to them, and since they would not consent, it was resolved that they should be openly at war with Persia.

      Hdt. 5.96 Athenians refuse to take Hippias back, thus making their dispute with the Achaemenid Empire public (so it shall be war between us). The Achaemenid are no longer the only open aggressors on the board, free to build their empire at will. Now the threatened territories challenging their authority. This sets up the conflict between the states and also echoes Herodotus' idea of cyclical nations. Nations move from barbarism to simple, masculine, civilization to effeminate opulence. Once a nation reaches a level of effeminate opulence it will surely fall to a more rugged simple-living people.

    2. Artaphrenes, however, bade them receive Hippias back, if they wanted to be safe.

      Hdt. 5.96 Artaphrenes responds to the pleas of the Athenians with an ultimatum commanding the Athenians to take Hippias back as their tyrant, 500 BCE.

    3. While Hippias was engaged in these activities, the Athenians heard of it and sent messengers to Sardis, warning the Persians not to believe banished Athenians.

      Hdt. 5.96 Athenians sent a message to Artaphrenes in order to dissuade the Persians from believing or helping Athenian exiles (like Hippias), 500 BCE.

    4. but Hippias, having come from Lacedaemon into Asia, left no stone unturned, maligning the Athenians to Artaphrenes, and doing all he could to bring Athens into subjection to himself and Darius.

      Hdt. 5.96 Hippias, the deposed tyrant of Athens, seeks help in re-securing power in Athens from Artaphrenes, the governor of Sardis (half brother to Darius)

    5. Then, desiring to make an alliance with the Persians, they despatched envoys to Sardis, for they knew that they had provoked the Lacedaemonians and Cleomenes to war.

      Hdt. 5.73 The Athenians come to Sardis to speak to the Persians about becoming allies, -507 BCE. The reader sees the Achaemenids and their past members (current revoltees) being replaced as the active agents in the narrative. Herodotus now has the Athenians and Spartans (Hellenes) speaking for their own interests rather than being dominated by outside forces (Achaemenid or otherwise).

  3. Feb 2014
    1. Solon said, “Tellus was from a prosperous city, and his children were good and noble

      1.30. Solon explains why he chose Tellus.

    2. Croesus was amazed at what he had said and replied sharply, “In what way do you judge Tellus to be the most fortunate?”

      1.30. Croesus is unhappy with Solon's answer and asks for clarification.

    3. Solon, offering no flattery but keeping to the truth, said, “O King, it is Tellus the Athenian.”

      1.30. Solon replies by citing an unknown Athenian.

    4. Croesus found the opportunity to say, “My Athenian guest, we have heard a lot about you because of your wisdom and of your wanderings, how as one who loves learning you have traveled much of the world for the sake of seeing it, so now I desire to ask you who is the most fortunate man you have seen.”

      1.30. Croesus asks Solon who the most fortunate man he has seen is, expecting the answer to be "You, Croesus".

  4. Sep 2013
    1. As to the hegemony, then, it is easy enough for you to make up your minds from what has been read to you that it should by right belong to Athens

      Athens has power, control