14 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2021
    1. We could quite easily create a model class that isn’t based on ActiveRecord and have it work as Rails is quite decoupled from ActiveRecord, but there are advantages to keeping our model class inheriting from ActiveRecord.
    1. With the introduction of CPUs which ran faster than the original 4.77 MHz Intel 8088 used in the IBM Personal Computer, programs which relied on the CPU's frequency for timing were executing faster than intended. Games in particular were often rendered unplayable. To provide some compatibility, the "turbo" button was added. Engaging turbo mode slows the system down to a state compatible with original 8086/8088 chips.
  2. Jan 2021
  3. Sep 2020
    1. Svelte started with no decoupling anywhere, with everything available at compile-time. Then <:Component> introduced separation at the component level -- but they're still coupled at properties. The spread feature would fill that gap. I see it as an intentional separation as opposed to an accidental shot at static analysis.
  4. May 2020
    1. Internal platform groups (those focused on a non-user facing part of our product, like a set of internal APIs) tend to create heavy coordination costs on other groups which depend on platform improvements to deliver valuable features to users. In order to stay efficient, it is important to ensure each group is non-blocking and is able to deliver value to users directly. This is why we avoid internal platform groups.
    1. Traditional CMSes are "coupled", which means that the CMS also takes care of the presentation layer responsible for delivering the content to the clients. The content and the presentation are closely interlinked. Typically, content managers create and manage their content through tools like WYSIWYG editors. The CMS then delivers the content according to the front-end delivery layer built into the CMS. Typically, a traditional CMS supports your websites but not much else.
    1. Most traditional (monolithic) CMS systems are “coupled”, meaning that the content management application (CMA) and the content delivery application (CDA) come together in a single application, making back-end user tools, content editing and taxonomy, website design, and templates inseparable. Coupled systems are useful for blogs and basic websites as everything can be managed in one place. But this means that the CMS code is tightly connected to any custom code and templates, which means developers have to spend more time on installations, customizations, upgrades, hotfixes, etc. and they cannot easily move their code to another CMS.
  5. Apr 2020
  6. Nov 2019
  7. Aug 2019
  8. Feb 2019