14 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2021
  2. May 2021
    1. A relatively comprehensive view of Wouter Groeneveld's commonplacing workflow. There are a few bits missing here and there, but he's got most of the bigger basics down that a majority of people seem to have found and discovered.

      He's got a strong concept of indexing, search, and even some review, which many miss. There's some organic work toward combinatorial thought, but only via the search piece.

      I should make a list of the important pieces for more advanced versions to have. I've yet to see any articles or work on this.

  3. Apr 2021
    1. A lot of this resonates with me. On links, it is often the reason I was interested in it in the first place that's the most important.

      The nostalgia factor is very valuable to me, but it also means you need an easy means for not only looking back, but regular reminders to do so.

      Owning your stuff: hopefully my stance on this is obvious.

      I'm not sure I agree so much with the taxonomy stance. I find it helpful to have it for search and review, the tougher part is doing it consistently with terms that are important to you.

  4. Mar 2021
  5. Feb 2021
  6. Sep 2020
  7. Aug 2020
    1. future gamification research should investigate specific elements of gamification rather than as an over-arching concept so that the effectiveness of different mechanics can be parsed out.

      see Chapman and Rich (2018), which examined this very thing.

  8. Jun 2020
  9. Mar 2020
  10. Jan 2020
    1. a private library is not an ego-boosting appendages but a research tool. The library should contain as much of what you do not know as your financial means … allow you to put there. You will accumulate more knowledge and more books as you grow older, and the growing number of unread books on the shelves will look at you menacingly. Indeed, the more you know, the larger the rows of unread books. Let us call this collection of unread books an antilibrary.
  11. Jan 2019
    1. Modifies a list to be sorted

      ? Like modifies to be sorted, like what does that mean? Sorts it? by what criteria?

    2. Note that when two integers are divided, the result is a floating point.

      note: check up what a floating point exactly means Googled : How floating-point numbers work The idea is to compose a number of two main parts:

      A significand that contains the number’s digits. Negative significands represent negative numbers. An exponent that says where the decimal (or binary) point is placed relative to the beginning of the significand. Negative exponents represent numbers that are very small (i.e. close to zero).