6 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2021
    1. By focusing on the condition of the looking glass, Joyce suggests the artist does not start his work with a clean slate. Rather there is considerable baggage he or she must overcome. This baggage might include colonial conditions or biased assumptions. Form and context influence content.

      This seems a bit analogous to Peggy McIntosh's Backpack of White Privilege I was looking at yesterday.

      cf. White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack' and 'Some Notes for Facilitators' | National SEED Project

  2. Feb 2018
    1. I am not concerned here to enter into debates about whether Joyce shoidd be considered a postcolonial writer nor whether Ireland can properly be located under the increasingly capacious umbrella of the postcolonial.4

      It's interesting to me that there is a gray area surrounding Joyce as a postcolonial writer, in comparison to more traditional postcolonial authors, like Salman Rushdie or post-colonial theorist, Frantz Fanon.

  3. Mar 2017
    1. And yes," says Molly, carrying Ulysses off be-yond any book and toward the new writing; "I said yes, I will Yes."

      I was curious about this line, so I did a little searching and I found this particularly interesting, since Cixous did her dissertation on Joyce:

      The episode both begins and ends with "yes," a word that Joyce described as "the female word" and that he said indicated "acquiescence, self-abandon, relaxation, the end of all resistance."

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molly_Bloom#Soliloquy

  4. Oct 2016
    1. falling faintly through the universe and faintly falling

      Chiasmus, cf. Portrait bird girl, "soft and slight, slight and soft."

  5. Jul 2016
    1. TWO GALLANTS

      Places named in the Joyce's story "Two Gallants" are charted sequentially and visualised in the StoryMap presentation at this location.