15 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2021
    1. dichotomous

      1: dividing into two parts

      2: relating to, involving, or proceeding from dichotomy the plant's dichotomous branching a dichotomous approach can't be split into dichotomous categories

      merriam webster

    2. Yet most companies neglect design as a strategy tool. What they don’t realize is that design can enhance products, environments, communi-cations, and corporate identity.”

      This is true because a Designer can communicate one's ideas in a clear and sensible way. Companies need design in order to get as many people to associate themselves with them.

    3. maelstrom

      1: a powerful often violent whirlpool sucking in objects within a given radius tried to shoot the canoe across a stretch of treacherous maelstrom — Harper's

      2: something resembling a maelstrom in turbulence the maelstrom enveloping the country a maelstrom of emotions

      merriam webster

    1. Let us then create a new guild of craftsmen without the class distinctions that raise an arrogant barrier between craftsman and artist! Together let us desire, conceive, and create the new structure of the future, which will embrace architecture and sculpture and painting in one unity and which will one day rise toward heaven from the hands of a million workers like the crystal symbol of a new faith.

      Bauhaus

      The Tower of Babel

      When I first read this manifesto, I had immediate associations with the Tower of Babel. The cathedral project of global neoliberal capitalism began as a socialist utopian project in the Weimar Republic as Germany’s first experiment in democracy. The democratic experiment failed when the Nazis shut down the Bauhaus in 1933.

      The experiment continued in the United States of America as the Bauhaus diaspora spread the ideas of modernism to the art, design and architecture academies around the world.

      The World Trade Center in New York City embodied the vision of modern architecture that Walter Gropius had been exploring at the Bauhaus, defining the trinity of building materials of the modern world: steel, glass, and concrete.

      When the twin towers collapsed on 9/11, the modernism movement came to an abrupt end. Ever since, we have been living in a distinctly postmodern world.

  2. Sep 2021
  3. Dec 2020
  4. Feb 2020
  5. Oct 2019
    1. The modernist work of art takes a stand against a world in which everything seems standardised, stereotyped and prefabricated.

      Modernism builds off Romanticism. How do we make sense of Duchamp, Log (even Cage -- who might be classified as postmodern) ... resistance to conformity.

  6. Feb 2019
  7. Feb 2018
    1. lthough less obviously ‘difficult’ than The Waste Land, Moulin Rouge!makes effective use of the dense layering effect allusion allows.This complex layering is put into the service of a simple, melodramatic love story, rather than a meditation on the spiritual aridity of modern life. Moulin Rouge!’s innocent, sentimental celebration of love could, in fact, be read as Luhrmann’s response the kind of dislocation Eliot portrays in The Waste Land.

      I really find this argument fascinating. The "less obviously difficult" perspective as it relates to many works that have been in-part inspired by The Waste Land. I like the idea of nuanced allusion, you don't necessarily need to know all the allusion to understand the storyline. This manifests itself well in works with more plot-based writing. The novel or cinema might be better at achieving the "less obviously difficult" allusion because it has a strong narrative already. The allusion comes alongside of it, or in the case of Moulin Rouge, the allusions are a part of the pop culture the audience is already familiar with.

    1. I am not concerned here to enter into debates about whether Joyce shoidd be considered a postcolonial writer nor whether Ireland can properly be located under the increasingly capacious umbrella of the postcolonial.4

      It's interesting to me that there is a gray area surrounding Joyce as a postcolonial writer, in comparison to more traditional postcolonial authors, like Salman Rushdie or post-colonial theorist, Frantz Fanon.

  8. Oct 2017
  9. Apr 2017
    1. making poetry in the streets

      One of the cool things about signifyin' is how much it blurs boundaries between everyday speech/language practices and things like writing and speeches which have traditionally been the modes of communication that rhetoric scholars have concerned themselves with. High and low culture is very interconnected, which is something we see not just here but I think also in literature of the Harlem renaissance and of modernist literature (might be worth noting that the Harlem renaissance was during modernism).

  10. Feb 2017
    1. Die Brücke Institute

      An important historical note here: most of the Die Brücke artists and their later avant-garde peers who fell under the various "-isms" such as Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, etc. were eventually persecuted by the Nazis, who believed the kind of art work seen above (Emil Nolde, Masks, 1911) to be "degenerate," which I think fits well into the dialogue about the "normalcy" of the body in creating socio-political standards. Artists such as Braque, Beckmann, Chagall, Dix, Grosz, Kandinsky, Klee, Matisse, Munch, and Picasso were all considered degenerate by the racially-obsessed Nazis because of the way they depicted the composition of the human body. Hitler looked to classical models, specifically Greek and Roman traditions, as examples toward which the German Volk should strive, because their ideal exterior forms embodied the inner Nazi idea of racial superiority, or normalcy. Modernists celebrated subjective and unique perspectives of reality (including, and especially the body), which, unfortunately for them, did not fit into the promotion of a singularly molded and racially uniform German state.