7 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2019
    1. Setting your school in Scholar Preferences will help you make direct connections to online sources provided by your library.

      This is an interesting tip. It can definitely be useful to connect your school to the Scholar Preferences so they can give you articles that you definitely have access to or books.

    2. If you want to locate sources in many different libraries, add WorldCat in addition to your library
    1. Most of the time, the first statements we try are not the best, even though Google or another search tool we’re using may give us many results.

      It is important to not be lazy when it comes to researching. Always look for quality posts rather than quantity no matter how many results turn up. Revision is key.

  2. Feb 2019
    1. Using questions and keywords to find the information you need

      Learning how to search correctly can help to find more accurate information faster by using keywords and other searching practices.

  3. Jan 2019
    1. the nomadic subjects

      Muckelbauer has a whole riff on nomads, traveling, and sophists in Future of Invention that resonates here and also above when Braidotti was talking about affirmation, negativity, and binaries.

      For Muckelbauer, traveling and repetition are central to discovery (even if the travel is over the same ground). I particularly like when he says, "we cannot know what a sophist is before setting out" (86)--and that lack of knowing makes the search more difficult because how will one know the sophist when one encounters him or her? Repetition is even more important as one must continue searching even after one has found a sophist, if for nothing else to make sure it was really a sophist.

  4. Apr 2016
    1. Search on a product description, gene name or gene systematic ID. Example of gene names: sty1, cdc2, atf1.

      Caution: do not use the simple search to retrieve e.g. All protein kinases, instead use the advanced search for this.

  5. Jan 2016
    1. The search box on Project Gutenberg uses a special syntax that actually allows more than just simple text searches. You can search by language, subject, author, and many others. For example:

      • The search "l.german" will produce only texts in German.
      • The search "s.shakespeare" will produce only texts about Shakespeare.
      • The search "s.shakespeare l.german" will produce only texts in German about Shakespeare.

      To see a more complete description of the syntax, go to the search page and click the "Help" button on the top-right of the page.

      I haven't figured out how to search for terms with multiple words in these searches. Can someone figure it out? For example, how do you search for "william shakespeare" as a subject rather than just "shakespeare"? Or "old norse" as a language and not just "norse"?