14 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2020
    1. They are proof that our openness about our data formats means that you do not have to fear data lock-in.
    2. It’s this third way that we avoid lock-in that is relevant to today’s topic. Our data format design is specified well enough so that people with no connection to AgileBits can write software to be able to handle it.
    1. If you don't—or can't—lock your users in, the best way to compete is to innovate at a breakneck pace. Let's use Google Search as an example. It's a product that cannot lock users in: users don't have to install software to use it; they don't have to upload data to use it; they don't have to sign two-year contracts; and if they decide to try another search engine, they merely type it into their browser's location bar, and they're off and running.
    2. it is far preferable to spend your engineering effort on innovation than it is to build bigger walls and stronger doors that prevent users from leaving
    3. Want to keep your users? Just make it easy for them to leave.
    4. Users are starting to realize, however, that as they store more and more of their personal data in services that are not physically accessible, they run the risk of losing vast swaths of their online legacy if they don't have a means of removing their data.
  2. Mar 2020
  3. Dec 2019
  4. Sep 2019
  5. Nov 2017
    1. Publishers previously lost a lot of revenue from textbooks because many students bought secondhand, rented, pirated or just skipped buying textbooks altogether. Inclusive-access programs have changed that.