10 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2019
    1. This is probably where Google Glass failed as there wasn’t much to do with it other than to spy on others…

      This is completely untrue and shows the lack of awareness of the Glass applications--and also how Glass continues to be useful in workflow scenarios. Martijn should know better.

  2. Dec 2017
    1. hat education like private & individual concerns, should be left to private & individual effort; not reflecting that an establishmen

      I found this to be a very interesting line that I had looked over the last time I read this. This, personally, is a subject I feel strongly about. I am a big proponent of public education, and I disagree with the people they describe here that believe education is a private concern, because education is most definitely a public concern. This gives me more respect for the writers of this report and Jefferson for wanting to create a public university that would make education a public, and not private, effort.

  3. Nov 2017
    1. & of indefinite extent in one direction at least,

      I recently went on a historical tour of UVA and therefore find this requirement quite interesting. Originally, there were the pavilions and the rotunda, and the lawn stretched indefinitely towards the side where Old Cabell Hall is now located. I wonder why they wanted it to be indefinite, maybe to show the scope of the students' futures? However, once it became legal for freed slaves to own land, many of the freed slaves owned land that was visible when facing towards that indefinite stretch of land. There needed to be another academic building, and it was because of the land there that they chose to close the gap of indefinence with Old Cabell rather than continuing to build outwards so that the students and faculty would not have to see the land owned by the freed slaves. That is why the "Z" on the steps of Old Cabell is black and not white. I just thought this was something interesting, and shows the strength of racism to prevent the University from carrying out Jefferson's wishes to keep an "indefinite extent" on one side of the lawn.

    1. On a pair of ordinary glasses is a square of fine lines near the top of one lens, where it is out of the way of ordinary vision.

      Holy Moly--this is Google Glass he is describing!

  4. Oct 2017
    1. What, but education, has advanced us beyond the condition of our indigenous neighbours?

      Here, as others have mentioned, Jefferson shows his intolerance for people of other cultures and races. I assume the "indigenous neighbours" he refers to are the Native Americans that we as Americans kicked out of their land and homes. To answer his rhetorical question, obviously things other than education have advanced people beyond their condition: race, for one thing, allows white people to gain a great advantage over indigenous people, whether educated or not. In addition, there are many types of education, as can be seen earlier when Jefferson discusses the inevitability of people arguing over what types of education should be mandatory at UVA, saying they will encounter "much difference of opinion." Therefore, who is Jefferson to call them less educated just because they are educated in different ways than white people? Sometimes it is easy to be blinded from some of Jefferson's less likeable opinions, and it is important to recognize these qualities when learning about him and the University's past. Matt F. Discussion

  5. Jul 2017
  6. May 2017
    1. It inspired his work at Google, where he led the creation of the historical map platform Field Trip, and then, the Pokémon Go precursor, Ingress.

      I loved field trip for Glass!

  7. Mar 2017
    1. Apple is reportedly working to bring a number of features to the iPhone and eventually develop wearable, wireless glasses that display content in augmented reality.

      Sounds an awful lot like Google Glass to me...

  8. Oct 2016
    1. Doubled the flames of sevenbranched candelabra

      This book brings out a lot of images of light, which is the opposite of death from the first book. The flames rise and doubles which really expresses the emphasis on the rising of the light.

  9. Jun 2016
    1. Title: The dying breed of craftsmen behind the tools that make scientific research possible - LA Times

      Keywords: government-funded research opened, snake glass coils, fuse glass beakers, organic chemistry, research hubs, world war, experienced glassblowers, glassblowers remain, church laboratory, befallen glassblowing, glass manufacturer, glass technicians, cost-cutting world, jobs tend, entry-level jobs

      Summary: Hunkered down in the sub-basement of the Norman W. Church Laboratory for Chemical Biology, underneath a campus humming with quantum teleportation devices, gravity wave detectors and neural prosthetics, Rick Gerhart chipped away at a broken flask.<br>Peering into the dancing flames, he examined his work for wrinkles — imperfections invisible to the untrained eye.<br>“It not only should be functional,” he said, smoothing the rim with a carbon rod, “it has to look good.”<br>Here in Caltech’s one-man glass shop, where Gerhart transforms a researcher’s doodles into intricate laboratory equipment, craftsmanship is king.<br>In a cost-cutting world of machines and assembly plants, few glassblowers remain with the level of mastery needed at research hubs like Caltech.<br>“He’s a somewhat dying breed,” said Sarah Reisman, who relied on Gerhart to create 20 maze-like contraptions for her synthetic organic chemistry lab.<br>Rick Gerhart, scientific glass blower at Caltech, has been helping to make scientific research possible at the campus since 1992.<br>(Dillon Deaton/Los Angeles Times)<br>Similar fates have befallen glassblowing at UCLA and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.<br>Across the U.S., those who land such jobs tend to stay until retirement.<br>He chuckled: “Looks like we have to steal somebody.”<br>To master scientific glassblowing, proper training and apprenticeships are key.<br>In addition to the hands-on training, which requires a knack for precision as well as coordination, students must take courses in organic chemistry, math and computer drawing.<br>So it really takes a long time to get to a position like Rick’s.”<br>Gerhart enrolled in the Salem program in 1965, after dropping out of college to give his father’s profession a try.<br>The craft, which dates back to alchemy in the 2nd century, took hold in America by the 1930s and 1940s, after World War I cut off glassware supply from Germany.<br>The profession peaked after World War II, when booms in oil and government-funded research opened up numerous glassblowing jobs in many a lab.<br>At first, Gerhart hopped around a number of firms and worked alongside more experienced glassblowers at TRW Inc. and UCLA.<br>When he settled at Caltech in 1992, the glassblower before him handed over the key to the shop and said, “Good luck.” On his own, Gerhart pieced together his patchwork of experience to twist and fuse glass beakers and snake glass coils over vacuum chambers.<br>“That’s when I really started learning.”<br>Social media videos have sparked new interest in the craft, Briening said.<br>But while his students have no trouble getting entry-level jobs at companies like Chemglass Life Sciences, a glass manufacturer, and General Electric Global Research, rarely are universities willing to budget the overhead costs for more than one glassblower, if any.<br>“Years ago, all the universities had two or three people,” Briening said.<br>One of the few resources left for the next generation is the American Scientific Glassblowers Society, a close-knit group that hosts national workshops and swaps ideas when a researcher’s custom order stumps one of its members.<br>Its members also serve as Caltech’s best — and possibly only — options once Gerhart leaves.<br>“Rick’s one of those glass technicians that I put in the top 5%,” Ponton said.<br>