19 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Wells's biggest work is Outline of History, published in 1920, a picture of cultural evolution as the main theme of history since the emergence of our species.

      !- H.G. Wells : Outline of history - cultural evolution as the main theme

  2. Sep 2022
    1. As a workaround you can recompile the client locally. I've just tried it and it's working just fine on Ubuntu 22.04 Clone the repo: git clone git@github.com:Jigsaw-Code/outline-client.git cd outline-client Install node 16 (for example using brew) brew install node@16 Install all dependencies npm install Build the app npm run action electron/build linux Now you have properly working Outline-Client.AppImage and you can run it ./build/dist/Outline-Client.AppImage

      Describes how to build electron app AppImage from source.

  3. Aug 2022
    1. While Heyde outlines using keywords/subject headings and dates on the bottom of cards with multiple copies using carbon paper, we're left with the question of where Luhmann pulled his particular non-topical ordering as well as his numbering scheme.

      While it's highly likely that Luhmann would have been familiar with the German practice of Aktenzeichen ("file numbers") and may have gotten some interesting ideas about organization from the closing sections of the "Die Kartei" section 1.2 of the book, which discusses library organization and the Dewey Decimal system, we're still left with the bigger question of organization.

      It's obvious that Luhmann didn't follow the heavy use of subject headings nor the advice about multiple copies of cards in various portions of an alphabetical index.

      While the Dewey Decimal System set up described is indicative of some of the numbering practices, it doesn't get us the entirety of his numbering system and practice.

      One need only take a look at the Inhalt (table of contents) of Heyde's book! The outline portion of the contents displays a very traditional branching tree structure of ideas. Further, the outline is very specifically and similarly numbered to that of Luhmann's zettelkasten. This structure and numbering system is highly suggestive of branching ideas where each branch builds on the ideas immediately above it or on the ideas at the next section above that level.

      Just as one can add an infinite number of books into the Dewey Decimal system in a way that similar ideas are relatively close together to provide serendipity for both search and idea development, one can continue adding ideas to this branching structure so they're near their colleagues.

      Thus it's highly possible that the confluence of descriptions with the book and the outline of the table of contents itself suggested a better method of note keeping to Luhmann. Doing this solves the issue of needing to create multiple copies of note cards as well as trying to find cards in various places throughout the overall collection, not to mention slimming down the collection immensely. Searching for and finding a place to put new cards ensures not only that one places one's ideas into a growing logical structure, but it also ensures that one doesn't duplicate information that may already exist within one's over-arching outline. From an indexing perspective, it also solves the problem of cross referencing information along the axes of the source author, source title, and a large variety of potential subject headings.

      And of course if we add even a soupcon of domain expertise in systems theory to the mix...


      While thinking about Aktenzeichen, keep in mind that it was used in German public administration since at least 1934, only a few years following Heyde's first edition, but would have been more heavily used by the late 1940's when Luhmann would have begun his law studies.

      https://hypothes.is/a/CqGhGvchEey6heekrEJ9WA


      When thinking about taking notes for creating output, one can follow one thought with another logically both within one's card index not only to write an actual paper, but the collection and development happens the same way one is filling in an invisible outline which builds itself over time.

      Linking different ideas to other ideas separate from one chain of thought also provides the ability to create multiple of these invisible, but organically growing outlines.

  4. Jul 2022
    1. https://archive.org/details/britannica_propaedia/mode/2up

      The one-volume Propædia is the first of three parts of the 15th edition of Encyclopædia Britannica, the other two being the 12-volume Micropædia and the 17-volume Macropædia. The Propædia is intended as a topical organization of the Britannica's contents, complementary to the alphabetical organization of the other two parts. Introduced in 1974 with the 15th edition, the Propædia and Micropædia were intended to replace the Index of the 14th edition; however, after widespread criticism, the Britannica restored the Index as a two-volume set in 1985. ==The core of the Propædia is its Outline of Knowledge, which seeks to provide a logical framework for all human knowledge==; however, the Propædia also has several appendices listing the staff members, advisors and contributors to all three parts of the Britannica.

      link to: - https://hypothes.is/a/ISNt8BBPEe2oTse1NiJv4w

    1. Because I wanted to make use of a unified version of the overall universe of knowledge as a structural framework, I ended up using the Outline of Knowledge (OoK) in the Propædia volume that was part of Encyclopedia Britannica 15th edition, first published 1974, the final version of which (2010) is archived at -- where else? -- the Internet Archive.

      The Outline of Knowledge appears in the Propædia volume of the Encyclopedia Britannica. It is similar to various olther classification systems like the Dewey Decimal system or the Universal Decimal Classification.

  5. Oct 2021
    1. “Canada is not an accident or a work in progress or a thought experiment. I mean that Canada is a scam — a pyramid scheme, a ruse, a heist. Canada is a front. And it’s a front for a massive network of resource extraction companies, oil barons, and mining magnates.”

      Canada is fake

      “Canada is not an accident or a work in progress or a thought experiment. I mean that Canada is a scam — a pyramid scheme, a ruse, a heist. Canada is a front. And it’s a front for a massive network of resource extraction companies, oil barons, and mining magnates.”

      https://twitter.com/bauhouse/status/1449737672407150595

      “Eventually they spread their land grab all the way to the Pacific Ocean and the northern coastlines in pursuit of gold, silver, iron, copper, nickel, and diamond reserves.… ‘Canada’ came about in the late 1800s for nakedly economic reasons…”

  6. Aug 2021
    1. Free/Libre and Open Source Software (FLOSS) FLOSS development communities, including both software engineering aspects and human factors FLOSS development processes, such as code reviews, joining process, etc. Best practices and case studies of open collaboration with FLOSS FLOSS collaboration beyond software (e.g. FLOSS collaboration for open data/content, open standards, open hardware, etc.) Wikipedia and Wikimedia Research Participation in Wikimedia communities Group Dynamics and Organization in Wikipedia and related projects Readership/Engagement on Wikipedia and related projects Technical Infrastructure and Design in Wikimedia projects Evaluating Content of Wikimedia projects Knowledge Diffusion, Outreach, and Generalization Open Collaboration Research, esp. Wikis and Social Media Novel open collaboration technologies ranging from entirely new socio-technical systems to MediaWiki extensions Wikis in corporations, academia, non-profits, and other organizations Online collaboration using social media technologies (e.g., Wikis, Blogs, Twitter)Theoretical work on open collaboration Digital divides and open collaboration technologies Open Data and Open Science Open data quality, standards, measures and metrics Open data and open science methods, applications and prototypes Best practices and case studies for Open Data and Open Science Repositories, networks and working platforms for open scientific communication, collaboration, exchange and access to open knowledge Open Education Tools and methods for managing, storing and sharing of Open Educational Resources (OER) Open online learning environments such as MOOCs Enabling individual learning paths Connecting formal and informal learning Supporting self-paced learning and co-construction of knowledge Development of new knowledge or products (e.g. Maker Spaces), collecting data (e.g. Citizen Science) or discussing political topics (e.g. e-participation). Open Innovation Architecture and design of open innovation systems The role of IT-artefacts in open and collaborative innovation activities Implementation of open innovation platforms in corporate IT landscapes IT security, intellectual property and personal anonymity in open innovationç Best practices and case studies of open data, open standards, open source for open innovation Open innovation and GLAM Open Policy/Open Government Open policy formulation and design Implications of open policies for governments Implementation of open policies Measuring the success and impact of open policies Best practices and cases studies of open policy/government Openness in various public initiatives (e.g. Smart Cities, Internet of Things) Open Standards Communities for development, maintenance, use, and implementation of open standards Implications of open standards for governments and other organizations Open standards development processes Open standards and licensing aspects
  7. Mar 2021
    1. Title: "goal the use case is trying to satisfy"[23]:101 Main Success Scenario: numbered list of steps[23]:101 Step: "a simple statement of the interaction between the actor and a system"[23]:101 Extensions: separately numbered lists, one per Extension[23]:101 Extension: "a condition that results in different interactions from .. the main success scenario". An extension from main step 3 is numbered 3a, etc.

      Not sure why I find this example so interesting.

      Probably because it is a human-readable outline that uses machine-readable (programming language source code) constructs, namely loops/iteration.

      The format in which this is written in, then, is itself a kind of (high-level, human-oriented) programming language.

      Example:

      • numbered list of steps [introduces/names the loop/iterator/enumeration being done]
        • Step: "a simple statement of the interaction between the actor and a system" [defines the inner part of the loop that gets "executed" once per iteration]
  8. Feb 2021
  9. Jan 2021
  10. Oct 2020
    1. Step 2 — Outline your talking pointsBy this point, you’ve generated intriguing talking points to support your argument and explore its significance. But your points are buried in a messy brainstorm.Now, extract the points that most intrigue you. Then, order them into a loose outline.
  11. Oct 2019
    1. bottom sheet 功能展示

      Outline 基本能保留我派文章的大部分样式,目前还转换不过来的我发现只有分割线和脚注。

  12. Mar 2018
  13. Nov 2017
    1. What is literacy? How am I supposed to learn from children’s literature?

      I'd like to use Adichie's The Dangers of A Single Story to start the first day of this course alongside a "Radical Honesty Statement" to illustrate the way we'll be using LITERACY to investigate our own relationship to writing and reading.