5 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2019
    1. What happened is that Spotify dragged the record labels into a completely new business model that relied on Internet assumptions, instead of fighting them: if duplicating and distributing digital media is free (on a marginal basis), don’t try to make it scarce, but instead make it abundant and charge for the convenience of accessing just about all of it.
  2. Jan 2016
    1. Now fintech platform OpenLedger and Danish bitcoin exchange CCEDK are joining forces with MUSE, a music-tailored blockchain, to make monetizing music as easy as new peer-to-peer (P2P) platforms made distributing it 15 years ago.

      PeerTracks, a music streaming and retail platform company, is the first outfit to use the brand new MUSE network, in partnership with CCEDK and OpenLedger.

      http://www.peertracks.com/faq.php<br> https://www.openledger.info/<br> https://www.ccedk.com/about

    1. This is from 18 August, 2015, so it's possible things have changed. But it's interesting anyway, and many links are given.

      Most music streaming services have been paying artists on a per-click basis. So most subscribers' money doesn't go to the artists they are listening to, but rather whichever artists get the most clicks. And this system is extremely vulnerable to click fraud.

      The author argues that Subscriber Share is a better system. With that method, your subscription fee is divided among the artists you listen to according to the percentage of time you spend listening to them.

      FAQ includes additional links and replies to counter-arguments.

  3. Dec 2015
    1. Huge follower counts on YouTube and social media DO NOT easily translate to income. And those followers expect you to be "real" -- so they are hostile to advertising and sponsored content.

      Do you own a business? It might pay to offer a salary to the producers of a YouTube channel that reaches your target audience -- in exchange for low-profile "brought to you by" links and mentions that won't offend that audience.

      https://twitter.com/JBUshow<br> https://twitter.com/gabydunn

    1. The supermarket giant, which has been selling CDs for decades, will stock a small selection of classic albums as well as a few new titles by the likes of Coldplay and George Ezra. LPs by The Beatles, Radiohead, Bruce Springsteen, Bob Marley and Elvis Presley be available, priced between £12 and £20.