18 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. set up

      This is the past participle of the verb "to set up".

      Also: do a web search for "be set up" vs "be setup".

    2. The verb set up, on the other hand, is usually found as an open compound (two words, no hyphen) in both American and British English.
  2. Jun 2020
    1. It’s a “bug” and you “fix” it - so properly, in English, it’s a “bug fix” - but very often it’s shortened to “bugfix”.
  3. Apr 2020
    1. the spelling "Web site" (and the less questionable "web site") is an anachronism from the 1990s that is still in use by the NYT and some other conservative print media in the US while most others (including the online sections of the NYT!) today use "website".
    2. English tends to build new compound nouns by simply writing them as separate words with a blank. Once the compound is established (and the original parts somewhat "forgotten"), it's often written as one word or hyphenated. (Examples: shoelaces, aircraft...)
    3. Web site / website seems to be somewhat in a transitional stage, being seen as an "entity" that web page hasn't reached yet. Depending on which dictionary you check you will find web site and website, but only web page, not webpage.
  4. Mar 2020
  5. Jun 2017
  6. www.matthewedavis.net www.matthewedavis.net
    1. confront

      Repetition of "confront" perhaps change to one of the following: contemplate (critically) examine scrutinize reflect on