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  1. Last 7 days
    1. A Congolese leader, toldof the Portuguese legal codes, asked a Portuguese once, teasingly: “What is the

      penalty in Portugal for anyone who puts his feet on the ground?”

      Was this truly a joke or is there more cultural subtlety here than provided?

      Compare this with Welsh mythology from the fourth branch of the Mabinogi and a tale from Cpt. James Cooks' travels

      The Fourth Branch pivots upon the towering figure of Math, Lord of Gwynedd, son of Mathonwy. Math was almost certainly of divine origin. His story is distinctive in Welsh mythology because it may reflect a pre-Christian myth of Creation and Fall. A condition of Math’s power – and indeed his life – was that, unless he was away fighting his enemies, he must stay at home and, bizarrely, sit with his feet in the lap of a maiden: the girl’s virginity was imperative. The name of Math’s foot-holder was Goewin. This strange prohibition on Math’s rule can best be explained if his origins lay in the pagan mythic tradition of sacral kingship so prevalent in Irish myths, wherein the mortal king ‘married’ the land in the form of the goddess of sovereignty. In a Welsh twist, the virgin status of the ‘goddess’ appears to reflect the perceived power of undissipated female sexuality, whose concentrated potency was necessary for the land to remain prosperous.

      But the connection between royal feet and the land may have even more complex roots. When Captain Cook explored Tahiti in the mid-18th century, he came across a tradition in which a Polynesian chieftain journeying outside his own lands had to be carried because any territory on which he set foot automatically became his, thus risking war between him and neighbouring chiefdoms. Clearly it would be outrageous to suppose direct connections between early medieval Wales and 18th-century Polynesia. But Cook’s observations inspire us to look for deeper ways of interpreting Math’s situation. via chapter 4 of Aldhouse-Green, Miranda. The Celtic Myths: A Guide to the Ancient Gods and Legends. (Thames and Hudson, 2015)

  2. Jun 2021
  3. Mar 2021
    1. Was the type specimen for Cassidula nucleus (Gmelin, 1791) collected by James Cook (1728-1779)? The type specimen with catalog number NHMD-155242 is collected at Tahiti and James Cook visited Tahiti during all of his three voyages (1768-1771; 1772-1775; 1776-1779).

      Cassidula nucleus (Gmelin, 1791) https://www.gbif.org/species/7932657 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cassidula_nucleus http://www.wikidata.org/entity/Q3695551 http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=549377 http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=882010

      original description (of Helix nucleus Gmelin, 1791) Gmelin J.F. (1791). Vermes. In: Gmelin J.F. (Ed.) Caroli a Linnaei Systema Naturae per Regna Tria Naturae, Ed. 13. Tome 1(6). G.E. Beer, Lipsiae [Leipzig]. pp. 3021-3910. , available online at http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/83098#5 page(s): 3193

      Original description of Helix nucleus Gmelin, 1791: "Nucleus. 255. H. tefta imperforata ovata glauca transverfim ftriata: cingulis atris, apertura finuola. Martin univ. Conch. 2. t. 67. fig. exter. Habitat in Tahiti."

      The first voyage (1768–1771) of James Cook arrived at Tahiti on 13 April 1769. The second voyage (1772–1775) of James Cook also landed at Tahiti to resupply in 1774. And again during his third voyage (1776–1779). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Cook

      Systema Naturae was originally published in 1735. But does not include Helix nucleus. The 10th edition 1758 does not include Helix nucleus. The 12 edition (1766-68) and last edited by Carl Linnaeus (1707-1778) does not include Helix nucleus. While the 13th edition edited by Johann Friedrich Gmelin between 1788 and 1793 does include Helix nucleus in volume 1 part 1 published in July 1788. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Systema_Naturae

      The type specimen held at Zoological museum of the the Natural History Museum of Denmark with catalog number NHMD-155242 is indicated as collected by James Cook at Tahiti. As the type specimen for Helix nucleus Gmelin, 1791, it must have been collected before 1791.

      https://www.gbif.org/occurrence/2012930732 https://www.gbif.org/occurrence/2012930732#annotations:_zXnVoS2EeuTD5vLxRG34Q

    2. Was the type specimen for Cassidula nucleus (Gmelin, 1791) collected by James Cook (1728-1779)? The type specimen with catalog number NHMD-155242 is collected at Tahiti and James Cook visited Tahiti during all of his three voyages (1768-1771; 1772-1775; 1776-1779).

    1. Was the type specimen for Cassidula nucleus (Gmelin, 1791) collected by James Cook (1728-1779)? The type specimen with catalog number NHMD-155242 is collected at Tahiti and James Cook visited Tahiti during all of his three voyages (1768-1771; 1772-1775; 1776-1779).

      Cassidula nucleus (Gmelin, 1791) https://www.gbif.org/species/7932657 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cassidula_nucleus http://www.wikidata.org/entity/Q3695551 http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=549377 http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=882010

      original description (of Helix nucleus Gmelin, 1791) Gmelin J.F. (1791). Vermes. In: Gmelin J.F. (Ed.) Caroli a Linnaei Systema Naturae per Regna Tria Naturae, Ed. 13. Tome 1(6). G.E. Beer, Lipsiae [Leipzig]. pp. 3021-3910. , available online at http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/83098#5 page(s): 3193

      Original description of Helix nucleus Gmelin, 1791: "Nucleus. 255. H. tefta imperforata ovata glauca transverfim ftriata: cingulis atris, apertura finuola. Martin univ. Conch. 2. t. 67. fig. exter. Habitat in Tahiti."

      The first voyage (1768–1771) of James Cook arrived at Tahiti on 13 April 1769. The second voyage (1772–1775) of James Cook also landed at Tahiti to resupply in 1774. And again during his third voyage (1776–1779). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Cook

      Systema Naturae was originally published in 1735. But does not include Helix nucleus. The 10th edition 1758 does not include Helix nucleus. The 12 edition (1766-68) and last edited by Carl Linnaeus (1707-1778) does not include Helix nucleus. While the 13th edition edited by Johann Friedrich Gmelin between 1788 and 1793 does include Helix nucleus in volume 1 part 1 published in July 1788. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Systema_Naturae

      The type specimen held at Zoological museum of the the Natural History Museum of Denmark with catalog number NHMD-155242 is indicated as collected by James Cook at Tahiti. As the type specimen for Helix nucleus Gmelin, 1791, it must have been collected before 1791.

      https://www.gbif.org/occurrence/2012930732 https://www.gbif.org/occurrence/2012930732#annotations:_zXnVoS2EeuTD5vLxRG34Q

  4. Jul 2020
  5. Oct 2019
  6. library.oapen.org library.oapen.org
    1. journeyshewishestheBoardto

      Cooke wants the Board to pay for her travels back into "society" - I'm not sure she mentioned this in previous letters to Greene

    2. MissCoo

      Even though miss cooke has been released, she doesn't know and so she stays there

    3. heywillgrantit.

      Greene grants Cooke permission to leave missionary work

    4. Idonotwish,norshouldIbCyanymeansfeelwillingtotakesuchastep,unlesstheindicationsofProvidenceshouldseemclearlytorenderitadvisable

      Cooke really wants to quit from all connection with the Board

    5. acceptsherresignati

      Miss Cooke resigns

    6. WearebutMissCook,hrs.Ely,self&littleDaughter.Howlonr3138Cookwillremainisuncertain

      Miss Cooke is still at Fond du Lac

  7. Sep 2019
    1. MissCookisnowatFondduLac.ShewentthereinMay&willprobablyremaintillnextspring.Heraidseemedtobeneededtheremorethanhere.MrElyiserectingsomesmallbuildingsfortheaccommodationofhisfamilyandschoo

      Miss Cook is at Fond du Lac with Mr. Ely

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  8. Aug 2019
    1. MissCookhashadthewholechargeoftheschool.Sheismuchdevotedtotheinterestsofthechildren

      Miss Cook is the teacher at La Pointe in November 1833

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  9. Jun 2019