11 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2019
  2. Mar 2019
    1. This is Bloom's taxonomy of cognitive objectives. I selected this page because it explains both the old and new versions of the taxonomy. When writing instructional objectives for adult learning and training, one should identify the level of learning in Blooms that is needed. This is not the most attractive presentation but it is one of the more thorough ones. rating 4/5

    1. This 69 page PDF offers good advice on writing a variety of types of test questions. It is called "Is this a trick question?" Despite the length of the PDF, it is easy to browse if you are interested in writing a specific type of question. As may be suggested by the length, this resource is more comprehensive than others. Rating 5/5

    1. This is one of many pages that lists verbs at various levels of Bloom's old taxonomy (verb lists for the new version are easy to find as well). This one has green bars across the page so may not be best for those who are trying to preserve ink though it is easy and attractive to use if referring to it on the screen. Rating 4/5

    1. Mager's tips on instructional objectives This is a very simple page that consists of black and white text without any graphics. As is, the text on the page is rather small and difficult (for me, anyway) to read, so one may wish to enlarge it. The process of creating instructional objectives in this format is explained in a clear and straightforward way. Rating 5/5

    1. setting up objectives

      How do we augment our ability as humans to set objectives? How do we observe that process? How do we gain insight into hidden aspects and drivers of setting intention? How do we recognize our own framings? How do we re-frame? If the Anthropocene Epoch means anything, it is that our own emoto-cognitive lenses make all the difference.

  3. Nov 2018
    1. People learn best when they care about a topic and believe they can master it. This presents us with a problem because most scientists don’t want to program: they want to do science. In addition, their early experiences with computers are often demoralizing, and believing that something will be hard to learn is a self-fulfilling prophecy.

      From the revelations in How Learning Works (p. 79) that value and expectancies drive motivation and how these interact derives from the learning environment, I see that in this situation, we need to build a positive learning environment more via the third and fourth factors listed above (Encouraging learners to learn from each other and acknowledging confusion). Setting learning goals that show the relevance of the coding skills to the learners' future professional existence and our own enthusiasm for the coding, will help us create value and design assessments and activities that are in alignment with the goals. Thus, learners' expectations can be enhanced.

  4. Nov 2017
  5. english121.commons.gc.cuny.edu english121.commons.gc.cuny.edu
    1. • Students will consider the role “literacy” and “writing” has played in their personal and public life

      We investigate "literacy" during every class period through reflective writing.

    2. • Students will develop research skills required to complete academic assignments

      Students complete a research project that blends their own understanding of literacy with an existing conversation occurring out there somewhere. We recognize research doesn't mean googling the day before an assignment is due; instead, it means composing: a summary of an important person that seems to be connected to our research, a summary of a concept that is necessary to our research, a review of sources that seem interesting, an argumentative piece that inserts our own position amidst the existing conversation.

    3. • Student will be able to read and listen critically and analytically

      To accomplish this objective, we read Children's literature, watched a Disney movie, read research articles on literacy, participated in discussions on the challenges and value of public writing as a research tool, and simulated three reading experiences when interacting with any text. The three reading experiences include: • Reading for information on writing process • Reading for understanding of rhetorical techniques • Reading for acquisition of evidence for long-term research project

  6. Feb 2014