1,556 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2016
    1. The lumbering ox drawing green beech logs to mill,

      Adore this line of present participles, logs-ox, and what reminds me of the zen series of ox pix.

    2. leave these

      Assonance of "leave these". Purpose? A lyric aid to memory. I think you will find an attention to detail in this sonnet of Still's that is all about helping the reader to memorize the poem. I used to have eighth graders memorize this poem in an 80 minute block. Not possible without the careful attention to lyric rhetoric here. The assonance, repetition, rhyme, alliteration, and all the other lyric tools reside in this eminently memorizable poem.

    1. Adrienne Rich

      Why do poems have to do anything? If they are instruments then they are knives that can cut any number of ways. Poetry is a weapon?

    2. Arts of the Possible

      The ultimate realpolitik:

    3. Doubts rain down.

      O WESTERN wind, when wilt thou blow<br> That the small rain down can rain?<br> Christ, that my love were in my arms<br> And I in my bed again!

    1. These are areas where a consistent flow of talent, dollars and resources could have been building mentor-rich, non-school tutoring, mentoring and learning programs, borrowing from examples of effective programs already working in Chicago and other cities.

      We already know what works. We already know what works in Chicago. So...the problem is the solution?

    2. too few were coordinating their actions, and their funding, with others.

      All of these folks are attempting to leverage from their own spots, but no one knows whether the rock has moved nor whether we are leveraging against each other. Have we reach a level of complexity that is impossible to find a good place to wedge the bar? I certainly hope not. I do not despair as long as we keep trying.

    3. I'm going to send the link to this blog back to the Times.

      I have done this, too. The NYT article and the flood of comments is a classic example of what we need to do as teachers in this country. We need to curate constantly (summarize, analyze, critique) and show others how to do it as well. We are doomed to curation-by-bot if we don't

    1. Kevin

    2. (the wall’s crowded)

      Yet everything fits, yes?

    3. intrigued by bad design

      Interesting Googage here: https://goo.gl/9knDOY

      And here: http://goo.gl/Op1qu5

      And here: https://i.imgur.com/wReGFDI.jpg (NSFW)

    4. it is impossible to even look at.

      I am reminded of this telling James Scott photo that defines the difference between legible and illegible:

    5. a certain chaotic beauty to the wall

      Perhaps there is a Fibonacci sequence in your Padlet. You never know with an unknown unknown.

    6. What you get is a mess.

      OR A MAZE?

    1. Annie Sauter says: May 28, 2016 at 9:28 am

      Susan, did you read this comment. Kinda captured my own lostness but not quite. I get the feeling that I need to give up some of my...contextity? That's like saying "Hoist anchor" in a storm. And that really is a way of breaking smart if it saves your damned life. Our political life is exactly like this now. The contextity is killing us. Hoist the fucking anchor or be dragged down with it when the storm batters hell out of you. Here I am again trying to put down the meaning anchor. This is hard to do when you have spent your whole life trying to understand and do and drive uncertainty and ambiguity to ground. I think maybe the key for me to is to feel my way with a new set of antennae, nascent and emergent antennae.

    2. I am wary of praxtitioners. I suspect them of being in a hurry to disintertwingle things I’m not done with yet.

      disintertwingle--sounds like a quantum state being done some amount of violence. Break bad by not disintertwingling too soon.

    3. In the familiar language of everyday decision-making, ambiguity means being unsure where to go, while uncertainty means being unsure how to get there.

      Maybe we need to rethink the rhetorical notions of audience (the who) and be more concerned with being more sure as readers and writers about where we want to go with a text and how we want to go there.

    4. When you are missing information, that’s uncertainty, and an epistemological matter. When you are lacking an interpretation, that’s ambiguity, and an ontological matter.

      Feeling quite lost here, but in an interested way.

    1. there is no concept of waste in true play

      Channeling James Carse here? Infinite play has no waste because that would require one to have a set of criteria before starting. True play has an infinitude of rules that be more like guidelines, arrrrrrrr, mateys.

    2. 29/ But big picture, the range of possible futures for humanity depends on our individual and collective ambiguity tolerance. 30/ Ours is an age of low ambiguity tolerance and a hunger for one determinate future for all. Resist! Increase your ambiguity tolerance. Help keep the future indeterminate!

      How to break smart--increase your ambiguity tolerance.

    3. seeing something where there is nothing

      mistaken insight into the pattern.

    4. being wrong

      the problem of faulty analysis

    5. Here's an interesting article about the distinction. 

      Here is a wormhole for more annoting: https://via.hypothes.is/http://www.wired.co.uk/article/eureka-moment-cognitive-psychology-john-kounios

      Are you an "analyst" or an "insightist"?

    6. analytical skills
    7. The 2x2 above

    8. You feel like you're engaged in enjoyable play when your thinking has the right level of ambiguity and uncertainty FOR YOU

      Play is haptic. It has a feel. And that feel is very idiosyncratic (and not customizable).

    9. Ambiguity resolution is an act of imagination.

      Aphorist heaven

    10. Your ambiguity tolerance is a function of the amount of (clean, complete) pre-meaning information you can stare at, and how long you can tolerate not knowing what's important about it.

      Tension. I think that is what we are feeling here. How much tension (this v that, spy v spy) are we willing to accept at any one time before resolution. Objective correlative anyone?

    11. To resolve ambiguity is to add meaning and interpretation to information.

      I wonder how, in its use here, ambiguity is akin to curation. Noun v verb? Is v am?

    12. Ambiguity

      The question that ambiguity evokes: what am I looking at? The question that uncertainty evokes: what do I do with what I am looking at?

      Does the first question precede the second as we move through the world?

    13. there is an aspect to information processing that is not a "doing" skill but a "seeing" skill: this is ambiguity wrangling.

      What Rao sez,

      We live in a world with gradually increasing levels of uncertainty and ambiguity. Over the last few decades we've become much more comfortable with uncertainty, but still suck at dealing with ambiguity. Ambiguity is not knowing what you are looking at, as in those trick drawings that look like a rabbit one way, a duck another way. Uncertainty is not knowing what to do with what you're looking at. Unlike uncertainty, which is about missing or noisy information, ambiguity can exist even with complete, clean information. It is about interpretation and meaning, and is as such a truly creative act of seeing.

    1. Chief Happiness Officer

      Sorry, I can't think of a corporate hierarchy chart and think "happiness". Just can't...with a little smirky lift of my lips. My bias. How can a corporation be happy? Aggregate of all the happy workers? I aint never seen no corporation smile.

    1. framingchoicesmatter.

      In other words acknowledging that the solution to the problem might live in how you set the uncertainty and ambiguity levels when you frame the question/problem.

  2. May 2016
    1. Weproposethattheefficiencyoftheproblem-solvingprocessandtheoutcomeofthisprocessdependsonthefitbetweentheuncertaintyandambiguitylevelschosen,theresourcesavailable,andtheorganizationalcontext.

      You can choose ambiguity and uncertainty levels? I thought they just came to you as part of the problem. Exogenous.

    1. Knowledge, the state of having collapsed ambiguity around an X, but not necessarily uncertainty, is always an instrumental state. You don’t know what X means, but you have figured out some things you can do with or to X, and what else you need by way of data and Y’s and Z’s in order to do it.

      Startling a fox in the woods! What an idea--ideas like black holes, always collapsing and constraining, trapping the reader in a monad.

    2. Being a Lost Reader I define being lost in reading as not knowing how to read whatever it is you are trying to read. How you read — with trust or skepticism, unironically, or unironically, respectfully or disdainfully — determines what you will get out of the experience. So to know how to read something is to have already judged what you can get out of the experience. This means operating with either prejudice or received authority. When you read without knowing how to read, you may not find out for years, or ever, whether what you read was true, false, or bullshit (suitably generalized for aesthetic truths). Or indeed, even what you just read. Do a twitter search for the phrase “what did I just read?” to get a sense of this state if you haven’t experienced it. It is the textual equivalent of “what exactly am I looking at here?” or “who is this for?” There are both epistemological and ontological components to being lost.

      Susan. Maybe I spoke too quickly when I said the response to Deleuze was gibberish. That has too much negative tone to it. It is gibberish to me. I get lost in it and ask myself, "WTF is this?" and "Where the hell am I?" This post in ribbonfarm blog makes me feel the same way, but happier.

    1. A broken guitar…don’t break the music in your soul.
    2. albeit we took a few years off

      I wonder if this learning world has changed even over a two year period?

    3. Something else that I don’t quite see right now.

      Could it be....

    4. facilitating a course

      Perhaps the whole idea of a "course" needs reconsideration, subversion, or even outright rejection?

    5. Something else that I don’t quite see right now.

    6. Teachers are just not really ready to dive into the core principles of Connected Learning because it remains an unknown idea.

      Maybe they make unconscious connections CommonCore/ConnectedLearning?

    7. It feels like a failed attempt to push us forward. I feel as if I failed to push us forward.
    8. what Connected Learning is all about

    9. I’m having a hard time writing this post

    10. Call Me Disappointed

      Partying in the margins?<br>

    1. What space would these words take up? How might they move? What would be their destination? How could they shape reflection?

      Soiunds like an inquiry machine.

    2. Act 2.

      Is this your way of hinting that "There are no second acts in American lives."? Cuz I don't see no nothing here between Act 2 and Footnotes.

    1. upon a time

      Be sure to check the comments below.

    2. John O. McGinnis

      Check him out: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_McGinnis

      What a tiny echo chamber this dude lives in! He could probably touch all four walls without moving.

    1. Learning is mystery

      I would like learning to be more like magic and bar tricks than like TED talks and badges.

      https://youtu.be/zgMnlptZt7I

    2. What if we took this Venn

    1. Coming up strawberries.

      I accidentally ran the tiller through my strawberry bed this spring. Who knew? Strawberries are antifragile.

    2. "Teaching like strawberries"

      “The irony of the process of thought control: the more energy you put into trying to control your ideas and what you think about, the more your ideas end up controlling you.” ― Nassim Nicholas Taleb, Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder

    3. "Memory is never a precise duplicate of the original...it is a continuing act of creation." 

      Different types of cells in the body are being replaced at different rates. Brain cells are the oldest in the body. I wonder if that has to do with memory?

    4. Be attentive to gifts of love.

      Be responsive to gifts of love by your own best lights.

    5. Maux des Mots

      Words are a garbage dump, random, not a landfill where the shit is organized.

    6. Scratching around...

      This is a feldgang, but with a twist. I see you taking on different identities, passing on to the next one some "baton" and then carrying on the conversation within that new set of bones. Or maybe it is a strawberry runner putting down roots and making a rhizomatic mat and carrying on, passing on hyphae and rooting ever on. All I know for sure is that I want to draw a random walking line down your post's page. I don't know why, but that is what I see in my crystal self.

    1. It’s been a little more than three years since Margaret Mary Vojtko, an adjunct professor of French at Duquesne University, died in abject poverty at age 83. Despite having taught at Duquesne for 25 years, she had so little money that she was sleeping in her office after being unable to heat her home due to medical bills incurred as she fought ovarian cancer. Vojtko received $3,500 a course, and earned an average annual salary of less than $10,000. Like most adjuncts, she received no benefits, no health care, and no retirement plan from the university, forcing her to work well past the age of the average American pensioner.

      The Age of Indifference

    1. curriculum of wide-awakeness

      First blush: do these words belong together? Curriculum and wide-awakeness? When I think of curriculum, I think of a track that I am running in, that the rules do not allow variance, that is pre-set and pre-determined. Wide-awakeness seems to be opposed. Perhaps as the terms are defined my thoughts will change.

  3. Apr 2016
    1. A corpse is a corpse is a corpse.

      "Exquisite Corpse was a perfect parlor game, involving elements of unpredictability, chance, unseen elements, and group collaboration—all in service of disrupting the waking mind’s penchant for order."

    2. I wept.

      And the small rayne down can rayne...

    3. Heinz tomato soup

    4. Heinz tomato soup

    1. one weekend of Coachella, people tweeted 3.8 million times
    2. Users upload more than 400 hours of video to YouTube every minute
    1. My direction.

      Sometimes it is this far and not one step further. Sometimes the gravity of the time, the zeitgeist tsunami sweeps us all away. Sometimes I wear seven league boots and eat up the time and space beneath me like some meth-fueled hillbilly.

    2. the directionality that is constitutive

      loves me some directionalitus constitutificationobus. Especially soaked in the brine of orphans' tears and cooked sous vide with brimstone. Yummy.

    1. became city planners, planning a new city,-Capacity

      I am interested in the idea of cities that grow organically from the needs of its residents as opposed to the desires of those who think they control. Christopher Alexander comes to mind:

    2. became interesting not when it grew but when it shrank.

      Or as Linus Torvalds wrote, Interested not in how it got big but how it got small. In other words--the roots of community and community building.

    3. bitter Puritanism

      Love is the only sword that will slice through the chains of bitter Puritanism.

    4. All you need is love?

      <script async="" crossorigin="" src="//&lt;a href=" http:="" <a="" href="http://genius.com" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noopener">genius.com="" annotations="" load_standalone_embeds.js"="" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noopener">genius.com/annotations/load_standalone_embeds.js"></script>All You Need Is Love<br>― The Beatles – All You Need Is Love

    5. he Beatles
    1. immediate hiring freeze
    2. likely eliminate all travel funding for staff,
    3. the alternative is layoffs, which detract equally, if not more, from the image and mission of the university.
    4. There is so much uncertainty

      conclusion

    5. Additionally, how will the budget cut impact MLS programs in general

      transitions to effects on library programs generally.

    6. This is a big blow to the campus communities in Wisconsin, and it will have a dire, long-term effect for the faculty, staff, and especially the students.

      a transition from asserting that the cuts are disastrous to describing what those disastrous consequences are.

    7. In short, it’s a disaster.

      First paragraph describes the dire conditions in U of Wisconsin system because of budget cuts.

    8. quality of instruction
    9. Scylla and Charybdis.

      Sums up the paragraph above.

    10. a hard time conceptualizing
    1. Is it learning that is innate or is it curiosity

      Curiosity is inate. Learning is the result. But learning can be other lesser results as well.

    2. As always

      Scene: Two poker players, green felt table, chips in the middle. Smoke. Drinks with little water rings on cardboard coasters. Well past civil hours.

      You: I am a dustballfilled ramble through inate obscurity where curiosity is the center. I am on tap a decent beer to drink with a meal. So what are you?

      Me: I might be your friend with tough questions and no solutions or a librarian contrarian or a dust bunny with no center except the curiosity that opens up in a little corners of the world, ones we didn’t quite know were there.

      You: Deal.

  4. impedagogy.com impedagogy.com
    1. Courses are a fraud.

      So sayeth he.

    2. fraud

      Listen to the first part of this podcast and note how grades are a fraud and that they defraud. The farther grades take us away from feedback, the more fraudulent they are.

    3. fraud
    1. Eventually, the way I taught at the end of the year became the way I taught year-round.

      Love the sentiment and the practice here. Also I want teachers to add an "idler" element into their practice and into their students lives. I wouldn't even mind a bit of the ol' slacker either. Abe Lincoln oft-quoted about taking the time to sharpen the axe.

    1. "We have professional college teachers who have master's degrees in their field who have very little income, are on food stamps, or things like that,

      Is this happening here?

    1. •Integration of current developments in the scholarship of teaching or in the instructor’s field of expertise into the classroom

      What would this mean?

    2. •Direct supervision of student work of special merit

      emw intern supervision?

    3. •Student engagement activities relevant to student learning

      Remind? Alt communication channels like Twitter?

    4. •Leadership of and participation in pedagogical seminars or workshops

      What does this mean?

    5. the Department will relyonevaluations of teachingby colleagues in the Department, student feedback, anddata submitted by the candidate

      colleague recommendations? other data besides SITES

    6. We also recognize that new technologies have created opportunities inside and outside the classroomto improve student learning. The department values innovative and successful teaching in both traditional and technologically enhanced classes.

      describe an exemplary lesson? describe an exemplary course? Describe an exemplary service moment?

    7. fall under the heading of teaching expand beyond the traditional classroom

      how much can this informal part be a part of the process.

    8. Candidates must provide documentation that illustrates their achievements in teaching, research, and service, including SITE evaluations.

      what documentation will we expect?

    9. eaching, research/creative activity, and service

      teaching and service--service to university, faculty, students?

    Annotators

    1. Dave Cormier

    2. "In search of a new resilience for learning."

    3. a few words that I am hearing at the moment

      One of my favs is "college and career readiness"

    4. I try to think back a few years...
    5. Rationalisation.

    6. Resilience or Resistance?

      “The general principle of antifragility, it is much better to do things you cannot explain than explain things you cannot do.” – Nassim Taleb

    7. Resilience.

    1. I hope you'll share this story through your own networks

      I learned about:

    2. Probably, because they are "too busy" with the work of connecting youth and volunteers, and collecting information to convince donors to continue supporting them.

    3. or to help new programs grow in other places.

      OK, we need you to take six months away from your busy schedule to write this book: "Rules for Radical Digital Community Organizers" written by a kinder, gentler Alinsky-like leader--Daniel.

    4. On the Mapping for Justice blog I've been posting articles pointing to other data portals. I also created a concept map, showing some of the portals I have found.

      Daniel has been modeling this digital community organizer role for as long as there has been a graphical environment. I know that he has paired with some folks at Indiana University to help with his work and would love to hear how that is turning out.

    5.  I recognized several years ago that adding layers of information showing arts/tech would enable users to know where such programs were located, and where more are needed, but I've never found the resources/partners to build this level of understanding.

      I think this is a profound question you have raised: building levels of understanding, how to do it. The understanding comes from the connectivity, connectivism at work, right? Now I see why you valued your time at CLMOOC with folks who know that knowledge, learning and ultimately wisdom are the result of interaction, relating, sharing, playing and being in a shared space. In areas of poverty, that is the richest resource--each other and what we can make together. You can substitute a lot of capital with human caring and sharing. A lot. We need digital community organizers. We need them badly! Stand aside, Obama, and make room for the Digital Community Concierge

    6. the Chicago Tutor/Mentor Program Locator, created by my organization in 2008,

      Everything appeared to work for me. I assume that you need volunteers to update information. Ideally, you need API's that help you do that automatically. This represents a real opportunity for someone to help you automate your system. Or...scary thought...rebuild it. The problem is always how do we keep up with the data. Since this "keeping up" represents a huge investment in time (hence, dollars) I can appreciate your difficulty.

    7. Virtual Corporate Office presentation

      William Gibson's aphorism--the future is here, just not evenly distributed--applies here. I appreciate how Daniel sees Little Black Pearl's work and attaches his own to it--as in "Let a 1000 little black pearls grow." What he likens learning (the tutor/mentor connection) to is company distribution system. Corporations could be that learning distribution system. Any organization could be part of that distribution system. It is a profound piece of a new way of looking at learning as apart from schooling. Let's get to evenly distributing Daniel's ideas. They deserve a much wider listening circle.

      .png)

    8. videos like this,

      This comment taken from the YouTube comments section: "We did this 8 years ago! Cabrini Connections has a great place in my heart. If it was not for them I probably would have been in the gang. Now I graduated from Moody Bible Institute and plan to live overseas."

    9. Below is a video shown

      What he says.

    1. “It’s the unending, gratuitous, punitive increase in prices that is driving all of this,”

      Not finding the source for this quote. Only people referencing this article

    2. New America Foundation.

      WTF! My bs radar just exploded

      https://youtu.be/NtLycerCLYU

      Check out this [ultra right online mag](http://www.frontpagemag.com/point/211813/obama-and-soros-funded-liberal-think-tank-promotes-daniel-greenfield#) about this fouindation. Ugly writing.
      
    3. average student now leaves school owing
    4. mortgage crash
    5. Forty years later, in 2010, it accounted for 11 percent

      Here is a graph I found. Actually it is worse in some states than others.

    6. Between 1950 and 1970

      Paragraph about "facts". As a critical reader we need to investigate the facts and how they are interpreted. As above with the facts about profits being made my government so too here about percentages of family income and percentage increases of the CPI. Anybody up for looking instead of just taking him at his word. A good critique needs to explore facts and their fair use.

    7. Why was college so expensive?

      Again, uses question as transition. Try it sometimes. It works. Helpful to reader and writer.

    8. the sticker price

      Collinge agrees with Taibbi--it ain't the car loan interest, it's the cost of the car.

    9. Collinge – who founded the website StudentLoanJustice.org

      See link above or here.

    10. first in the history of drunken bullshitting

      You funny, Taibbi.

    11. Collinge

      What Collinge did

    12. His whole life was now about his student debt.

      Brilliant way of summing up what was said above.

    13. Collinge’s creditor,

      the particulars of the horror story

    14. a thirtysomething scientist named Alan Collinge

      First story. had a dream and invested in himself found a job lost his job couldn't find as good a job couldn't repay student loans.

    15. Why is this happening?

      Taibbi uses the same trick as before to transition to the "why" question, why is America acting like a vampire? This 'vampire' metaphor reflects another article Taibbi has written about Wall Street in which they are described as vampire squids.

    16. the government actually stands to make an enormous profit on the president’s new federal student-loan system, an estimated $184 billion over 10 years,

      The other major bad actor according to Taibbi is the Department of Education and its predatory lending wing. If you look at one of the background pieces above (http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/356551/what-profits-rolling-stones-matt-taibbi-misunderstands-student-loans-jason-richwine) you will see a different view about this number (even though the article agrees with much of what Taibbi writes).

    17. these little regional economic empires, the federal student-loan system is essentially a massive and ongoing government subsidy

      Student loans fuel everything. And if the legislature cuts university funding, then the university just makes it up with increased tuition. Students (aka taxpayers) go further into debt in what amounts to a tax increase on "users".

      Where's the money, Lebowski?

      The students have it (or they can borrow it). The conclusion that we can draw from Taibbi's analysis here is that public higher education is no longer seen as a public good paid for with public money. Western Kentucky University gets less than 20% of its budget from the state.

    18. First

      Note how simple and effective this kind of transition is. He says in the paragraph above that there are two major actors to blame. Then he takes the next to paragraphs to point the finger of blame where the real responsibility lay.

    19. They all take responsibility for their own mistakes

      Very powerful psychological analysis of the feelings of those with student loans. Take responsibility-->realize these are not irresponsible folk-->they are angry--> shift here to Taibbi's opinion, they should be-->they are not the cause of the miseries caused by this debt-->universities are as well as one other actor (hint: our hero in chief and all the others in the great game of politics)

    20. For this story

      Chekov reportedly said that if a gun appears in the first act it has to go off before the play ends. Taibbi shows the 'gun' here--the interviews of the people who have been shamefully and oppressively outraged.

    21. shameful and oppressive outrage

      Very strong words.

    22. How is this happening?

      Taibbi anticipates the good reader's question here and uses it as a way to transition. I think this is a perfect transition--helpful, anticipatory, and opening up the paragraph to follow. It is that natural flow of reader curiosity that a good writer has to assume the reader has.

    23. The thing is, none of it – not last month’s deal, not Obama’s 2010 reforms – mattered that much.

      This paragraph is bit of genius. Simple and to the point. It acknowledges the short-term good that was done either actually or theoretically, but dashes these to the ground by arguing that "it's not the interest rate, it's the principle." This is especially important because it acknowledges Taibbi's assumption that this is a financial crime perpetrated on students much like sub-prime loans and derivative speculations were perpetrated on Wall Street. "Eerily reminescent" speaks volumes. With legislatures increasingly getting out of the business of higher education after 2008, we can see that higher tuition is just a way of shifting taxes from the state to vulnerable, powerless students. Despicable.

    24. Obama had

      Earlier Obama-as-champion-of-students narrative

    25. that the student-loan controversy is now entirely about interest rates and/or access to school loans.

      Taibbi carries on the Obama story and how he strategically changed the student loan game by making debt about rising interest and making access to debt the real issues as opposed to the runaway cost of an education in general.

    26. a typically autoerotic assessment

      Example of over the top-ness? Fair. Puts off readers. Audience considered here by Taibbi?

    27. undergraduate loans under the new plan

      Rates now.<br>

    28. Flash-forward through a few months of brinkmanship and name-calling,

      So...this is a long story about how Obama outplayed everybody and made it a win-win situation for himself and the Congress. And at first glance for students as well.

    29. In a Karl Rove-ian masterstroke, he simply pretended they weren’t there and changed the subject.

      Brings up big political problems and then compares him to Karl Rove, Republican strategist--ignore the problem.

      Critique: is this the best way to introduce the student loan scandal?

    30. Victor Juhasz

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victor_Juhasz

      Really interesting background for the artist who does the original artwork for this piece.

    31. BY MATT TAIBBI
    32. Scandal

      oed

      Etymology: Early Middle English scandle , scha(u)ndle , < Old Northern French escandle, Central Old French eschandle , semi-popular < ecclesiastical Latin scandalum cause of offence or stumbling, < Greek σκάνδαλον , recorded only in Hellenistic literature, in the fig. sense ‘snare for an enemy, cause of moral stumbling’, but certainly an old word meaning ‘trap’ (compare the derivative σκανδάληθρον spring of a trap), believed to be < the Indogermanic *skand- to spring, leap: compare Latin scandĕre to climb, to scan v.

    33. Ripping Off

      Sets tone for article, hints of 'rough" talk to come? Likely he did not write headline, that's the editor's job.

    1. Who will name me? Who will love? Who will listen? Who will forgive?
    2. “ if I do not love the world if I do not love life if I do not love people I cannot enter into dialogue.”  ― Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed

    3. Nobody cares

    4. Nobody knows.
    5. ended in feelings of hurt and hard words. 

    6. We are wronged.

  5. Mar 2016
    1. leaching lead into the drinking water ever since.

    2. his office received a rebuke

    3. emergency manager law.

      Heckuva job Snydie!!!

    4. "It was a mixture of ignorance, incompetence and arrogance by many decision makers that created a toxic and tragic situation that produced the Flint water crisis."

    5. Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder says he has a plan.

    1. may see a choice between spending money on teachers or on plumbing as no choice at all.

    2. This winter’s crisis in Flint, Mich., has cast new attention on lead in water supplies.

    3. federal rules that largely exempts schools from responsibility for the purity of their water.

    4. Anxious parents may wonder

    5. eight schools’ drinking fountains in 2006, and in more schools in 2008, 2010 and 2012.

    1. innovate depends largely on how we define learning

      It seems innovation means to most minds doing something to someone else. In that sense I find it undemocratic and eventually destructive. Analogously, is a "discussion" that is foisted onto learners in Blackboard, for example, a real discussion or just a bunch of atomic responses to a prompt? The latter I think. Innovation is not static and most definitely not a thing. It is only innovative insofar as it is connected with or against something. Otherwise it is just another irrelevance like so much reform has been in education over the last two generations.

    2. And the vast majority of “innovation” I’ve seen in my visits to schools around the world doesn’t amount to much change at all in the area where we need it most

      innovation seems like a catalytic action. It is not innovation unless there is some kind of response, push back, acquiescence, reaction to or toward.

    3. OED entry

      innovation

      (ɪnəʊˈveɪʃən)

      [ad. L. innovātiōn-em, n. of action f. innovāre to innovate: cf. F. innovation (1297 in Hatz.-Darm.).]

      1. a.1.a The action of innovating; the introduction of novelties; the alteration of what is established by the introduction of new elements or forms. †Formerly const. of (the thing altered or introduced).

         1553 Brende Q. Curtius 221 b, Perdicas, whose ambicious mynde desirous of innouation, was (he sayde) to be preuented in time.    1561 T. Norton Calvin's Inst. Table Contents, It is the duty of private men to obey, and not to make innovation of states after their own will.    1597 Hooker Eccl. Pol. v. xlii. §11 To traduce him as an authour of suspitious innouation.    1614 Selden Titles Hon. 286 Thanes remained as a distinct name of dignitie, and vanisht not at the innouation of new honors.    a 1639 Webster Appius & V. v. iii, The hydra-headed multitude That only gape for innovation.    1796 Burke Corr. (1844) III. 211 It is a revolt of innovation; and thereby, the very elements of society have been confounded and dissipated.    1824 L. Murray Eng. Gram. (ed. 5) I. 65 This spirit of innovation has extended itself to other parts of grammar, and especially to the names of the Tenses.    1874 Green Sh. Hist. vii. §1 Cranmer and his colleagues advanced yet more boldly in the career of innovation.

      †b.1.b Revolution (= L. novæ res). Obs.

         1596 Shakes. 1 Hen. IV, v. i. 78 Poore Discontents, Which gape, and rub the Elbow at the newes Of hurly burly Innouation.    1633 T. Stafford Pac. Hib. i. xx. (1821) 206 For the same reason of innovation, he besought them to send unto him fiue Lasts of powder with match and lead.

      1. a.2.a A change made in the nature or fashion of anything; something newly introduced; a novel practice, method, etc.

         1548 Act 2 & 3 Edw. VI, c. 1 To staye Innovacions or newe rites.    1641 (title) A Discovery of the notorius Proceedings of William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury, in bringing Innovations into the Church.    1717 J. Keill Anim. Oecon. Pref. (1738) 47 This Attraction‥is no Innovation in Philosophy.    1800 Asiatic Ann. Reg., Misc. Tr. 106/1 The tribute you demand from the Hindûs‥is an innovation and an infringement of the laws of Hindustân.    a 1862 Buckle Civiliz. (1873) II. viii. 595 To them antiquity is synonymous with wisdom, and every improvement is a dangerous innovation.    1868 Freeman Norm. Conq. II. viii. 297 The sturdiest champions of Norman innovations.

      †b.2.b A political revolution; a rebellion or insurrection. (= L. novæ res.) Obs.

         1601 R. Johnson Kingd. & Commw. (1603) 227 Neither doth he willingly arme them for feare of sedition and innovations.    1726 Leoni Alberti's Archit. I. 77/2 A Province so inclined to tumults and innovations.

      3.3 spec. in Sc. Law. The alteration of an obligation; the substitution of a new obligation for the old: see quot.

         1861 W. Bell Dict. Law Scot. 450/1 Innovation, is a technical expression, signifying the exchange, with the creditor's consent, of one obligation for another; so as to make the second obligation come in the place of the first, and be the only subsisting obligation against the debtor, both the original obligants remaining the same.

      4.4 Bot. The formation of a new shoot at the apex of a stem or branch; esp. that which takes place at the apex of the thallus or leaf-bearing stem of mosses, the older parts dying off behind; also (with pl.) a new shoot thus formed.

         1835 Lindley Introd. Bot. (1848) I. 168 Shoots which have not completed their growth have received the name of innovations, a term usually confined to mosses.    1845 Florist's Jrnl. 130 The lateral ones‥terminate a two-leaved branch, or innovation, while the central peduncle springs from the apex of the older branch.    1863 Berkeley Brit. Mosses iii. 13 One mode of branching‥is known under the name of innovations.    Ibid. Gloss. 312 Innovations, accessory branches produced generally after the fruit is perfect.

      5.5 Comm. The action of introducing a new product into the market; a product newly brought on to the market.

         1939 J. A. Schumpeter Business Cycles I. iii. 84 Innovation is possible without anything we should identify as invention, and invention does not necessarily induce innovation.    1958 J. Jewkes et al. Sources Invention ix. 249 It seems impossible to establish scientifically any final conclusion concerning the relation between monopoly and innovation.    1962 E. M. Rogers Diffusion of Innovations v. 124 It matters little whether or not an innovation has a great degree of advantage over the idea it is replacing. What does matter is whether the individual perceives the relative advantage of the innovation.    1967 J. A. Allen Sci. Innovation & Industr. Prosperity ii. 8 Innovation is the bringing of an invention into widespread, practical use.‥ Invention may thus be construed as the first stage of the much more extensive and complex total process of innovation.

      6.6 innovation trunk, a kind of wardrobe trunk.

         1912 Bag, Portmanteau & Umbrella Trader 20 Nov. 18/1 The Innovation Trunk Company‥makes a striking show of wardrobe trunks. They also specialise in the refitting of ordinary wardrobes according to their principle.    1913 A. Bennett Regent iii. 83 Many parcels and boxes, comprising diverse items in the equipment of a man-about-town, such as tie-clips and Innovation trunks.    1915 E. Phillpotts Angel in House i. 17 Robert and Manservant enter through the main entrance carrying Innovation trunk.

      Hence innoˈvational a., of, pertaining to, or characterized by innovation; also in Comm.; innoˈvationist, one who favours innovations.

         1800 W. Taylor in Monthly Mag. VIII. 684 Writers, who bring against certain philosophic innovationists a clamorous charge of Vandalism.    1817 Bentham Plan Parl. Reform Introd. 194 A proposition so daring, so innovational.    1873 R. Black tr. Guizot's France II. xxv. 492 His kingly despotism was new, and, one might almost say, innovational.    1959 J. P. Lewis Business Conditions Analysis v. xxiv. 534 The insights of economics do not illuminate the process of innovation very much.‥ On the optimistic side of the innovational outlook, it can be argued, [etc.].    1960 L. S. Silk Research Revolution iii. 50 In the past, the United States has had three great innovational pushes.

  6. willrichardson.com willrichardson.com
    1. “innovation”

      OED entry innovation

      (ɪnəʊˈveɪʃən)

      [ad. L. innovātiōn-em, n. of action f. innovāre to innovate: cf. F. innovation (1297 in Hatz.-Darm.).]

      1. a.1.a The action of innovating; the introduction of novelties; the alteration of what is established by the introduction of new elements or forms. †Formerly const. of (the thing altered or introduced).

         1553 Brende Q. Curtius 221 b, Perdicas, whose ambicious mynde desirous of innouation, was (he sayde) to be preuented in time.    1561 T. Norton Calvin's Inst. Table Contents, It is the duty of private men to obey, and not to make innovation of states after their own will.    1597 Hooker Eccl. Pol. v. xlii. §11 To traduce him as an authour of suspitious innouation.    1614 Selden Titles Hon. 286 Thanes remained as a distinct name of dignitie, and vanisht not at the innouation of new honors.    a 1639 Webster Appius & V. v. iii, The hydra-headed multitude That only gape for innovation.    1796 Burke Corr. (1844) III. 211 It is a revolt of innovation; and thereby, the very elements of society have been confounded and dissipated.    1824 L. Murray Eng. Gram. (ed. 5) I. 65 This spirit of innovation has extended itself to other parts of grammar, and especially to the names of the Tenses.    1874 Green Sh. Hist. vii. §1 Cranmer and his colleagues advanced yet more boldly in the career of innovation.

      †b.1.b Revolution (= L. novæ res). Obs.

         1596 Shakes. 1 Hen. IV, v. i. 78 Poore Discontents, Which gape, and rub the Elbow at the newes Of hurly burly Innouation.    1633 T. Stafford Pac. Hib. i. xx. (1821) 206 For the same reason of innovation, he besought them to send unto him fiue Lasts of powder with match and lead.

      1. a.2.a A change made in the nature or fashion of anything; something newly introduced; a novel practice, method, etc.

         1548 Act 2 & 3 Edw. VI, c. 1 To staye Innovacions or newe rites.    1641 (title) A Discovery of the notorius Proceedings of William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury, in bringing Innovations into the Church.    1717 J. Keill Anim. Oecon. Pref. (1738) 47 This Attraction‥is no Innovation in Philosophy.    1800 Asiatic Ann. Reg., Misc. Tr. 106/1 The tribute you demand from the Hindûs‥is an innovation and an infringement of the laws of Hindustân.    a 1862 Buckle Civiliz. (1873) II. viii. 595 To them antiquity is synonymous with wisdom, and every improvement is a dangerous innovation.    1868 Freeman Norm. Conq. II. viii. 297 The sturdiest champions of Norman innovations.

      †b.2.b A political revolution; a rebellion or insurrection. (= L. novæ res.) Obs.

         1601 R. Johnson Kingd. & Commw. (1603) 227 Neither doth he willingly arme them for feare of sedition and innovations.    1726 Leoni Alberti's Archit. I. 77/2 A Province so inclined to tumults and innovations.

      3.3 spec. in Sc. Law. The alteration of an obligation; the substitution of a new obligation for the old: see quot.

         1861 W. Bell Dict. Law Scot. 450/1 Innovation, is a technical expression, signifying the exchange, with the creditor's consent, of one obligation for another; so as to make the second obligation come in the place of the first, and be the only subsisting obligation against the debtor, both the original obligants remaining the same.

      4.4 Bot. The formation of a new shoot at the apex of a stem or branch; esp. that which takes place at the apex of the thallus or leaf-bearing stem of mosses, the older parts dying off behind; also (with pl.) a new shoot thus formed.

         1835 Lindley Introd. Bot. (1848) I. 168 Shoots which have not completed their growth have received the name of innovations, a term usually confined to mosses.    1845 Florist's Jrnl. 130 The lateral ones‥terminate a two-leaved branch, or innovation, while the central peduncle springs from the apex of the older branch.    1863 Berkeley Brit. Mosses iii. 13 One mode of branching‥is known under the name of innovations.    Ibid. Gloss. 312 Innovations, accessory branches produced generally after the fruit is perfect.

      5.5 Comm. The action of introducing a new product into the market; a product newly brought on to the market.

         1939 J. A. Schumpeter Business Cycles I. iii. 84 Innovation is possible without anything we should identify as invention, and invention does not necessarily induce innovation.    1958 J. Jewkes et al. Sources Invention ix. 249 It seems impossible to establish scientifically any final conclusion concerning the relation between monopoly and innovation.    1962 E. M. Rogers Diffusion of Innovations v. 124 It matters little whether or not an innovation has a great degree of advantage over the idea it is replacing. What does matter is whether the individual perceives the relative advantage of the innovation.    1967 J. A. Allen Sci. Innovation & Industr. Prosperity ii. 8 Innovation is the bringing of an invention into widespread, practical use.‥ Invention may thus be construed as the first stage of the much more extensive and complex total process of innovation.

      6.6 innovation trunk, a kind of wardrobe trunk.

         1912 Bag, Portmanteau & Umbrella Trader 20 Nov. 18/1 The Innovation Trunk Company‥makes a striking show of wardrobe trunks. They also specialise in the refitting of ordinary wardrobes according to their principle.    1913 A. Bennett Regent iii. 83 Many parcels and boxes, comprising diverse items in the equipment of a man-about-town, such as tie-clips and Innovation trunks.    1915 E. Phillpotts Angel in House i. 17 Robert and Manservant enter through the main entrance carrying Innovation trunk.

      Hence innoˈvational a., of, pertaining to, or characterized by innovation; also in Comm.; innoˈvationist, one who favours innovations.

         1800 W. Taylor in Monthly Mag. VIII. 684 Writers, who bring against certain philosophic innovationists a clamorous charge of Vandalism.    1817 Bentham Plan Parl. Reform Introd. 194 A proposition so daring, so innovational.    1873 R. Black tr. Guizot's France II. xxv. 492 His kingly despotism was new, and, one might almost say, innovational.    1959 J. P. Lewis Business Conditions Analysis v. xxiv. 534 The insights of economics do not illuminate the process of innovation very much.‥ On the optimistic side of the innovational outlook, it can be argued, [etc.].    1960 L. S. Silk Research Revolution iii. 50 In the past, the United States has had three great innovational pushes.

    1. new-comers and novices

      agree, n00bs are fit from the git go, accepting the invitation to participate either overtly or covertly is enough to establish a fit attitude. Fit aptitude will come with practice.

    2. Remix as Professional Learning: Educators’ Iterative Literacy Practice in CLMOOC

      Just a quick look at frequency. Does this jibe as a visual gestalt with the text?

    1. already being innovative.

      I don't even know what this phrase or that word means anymore.

    2. We can’t answer the question “Is tech useful in schools?” until we’ve grappled with a deeper question: “What kinds of learning should be taking place in those schools?”

      Post hoc thinking, yes?

    3. downright orgasmic.
    4. technology for its own sake

      I am an utter instrumentalist about tech. Its proof is in its use. And that value is decided on each use so that what works one day may not the next. It all depends. I couldn't agree more with Kohn on this. The question then becomes, "What does it depend upon?"