7 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2019
    1. Turn it on like you always do. Be quick and efficient and impatient, which is the way you have always been. Start the water in the tub and scrub the kitchen floor while it is filling up. When the floor is done and the mop wrung out and hung in back to dry, the water is good, just the right depth. Like a clock you are. Not a second wasted.

      Foreshadowing the caos of suicide when the house and floor is flooding. She was the the one to clean it at one point now mama is the one causing the mess.

  2. Sep 2018
    1. Beowulf

      This editor chose to keep the manuscript reading "Beowulf"; the editors of Klaeber 4 emended to "Beow." In their Commentary on line 18f (page 113), they note that "Beow" fits the meter in "Beowulf"'s second appearance at 53, and that traditional genealogies provide the name "Beow." However, I prefer the choice (as does Liuzza in his translation): whether poet or scribe, someone has made the name match that of the poem's protagonist. An earlier hero foreshadows a later.

  3. Sep 2017
    1. With this excellent resolve for the future, Goodman Brown felt himself justified in making more haste on his present evil purpose

      I consider it foreshadowing because it literally has "this resolve for the future" in it. I believe that Brown is about to journey to go and take part in very bad actions considering he needed to "justify" his "present evil purpose".

  4. Jun 2017
    1. Caesar should be a beast without a heart, If he should stay at home today for fear. No, Caesar shall not: danger knows full well That Caesar is more dangerous than he: We are two lions litter’d in one day, And I the elder and more terrible; And Caesar shall go forth.

      Caesar, awoken by his wife Calpurnia’s nightmares, sends a servant to bid the priests to offer a sacrifice and tell him the results, which reveals an impossibly ominous future. Calpurnia enters and insists that Caesar remains home, but he rebuffs her, refusing to appear as a coward. But having witnesses the omens of the previous night (dead men walked, ghosts wandered the city, a lioness gave birth in the street, and lightning shattered the skies), she begs him to remain. Yet Caesar claims nothing can change the plans of the gods and deems the signs to apply to the world in general and refuses to believe that they bode ill for him personally.

      Caesar is an illeist (refers to himself in third person) as if his very name deserves recognition in his own speech. He constantly suggests he is greater than man and even “danger knows full well that Caesar is more dangerous than he” as if overshadowing death. He claims he is “without a heart”, unbound by the limitations of life or the fear of death. He self claims a God title where danger is but a child to him. The scene reveals Caesar’s unending pride and overconfidence, as he remains ignorant to the evident extent of menace.

    1. Go you down that way towards the Capitol; This way will I. Disrobe the images, If you do find them deck’d with ceremonies.

      Although he is not tangibly introduced until the next scene, the audience is already presented with a fairly clear characterisation of Julius Caesar. However, Caesar's exact nature is determined through two juxtaposing attitudes towards the Empire.

      The Roman common-folk praise the defeat of Pompey, in fact making a "holiday to see Caesar and to rejoice in his triumph." On the contrary, the noble classes express a more pessimistic attitude; Flavius cautions that the new leader will "soar above the view of men, and keep us all in servile fearfulness."

      The tribunes believe that Caesar's power is too great for one man, and that his rise as Emperor will lead to the downfall of Rome. It is also a valid argument to say that they envy Caesar's might, especially since Flavius and Murellus are to lose an element of their own authority.

      After commanding the people to weep for the coming events, Flavius and Murellus leave to "disrobe the images" of Caesar. This metaphor refers to removing the decorations off Caesar's statues, a crime which they are later punished for. The desperation of such an act is an indication of how strongly Caesar is feared and detested by the noblemen.

      This scene leaves the audience with a preconceived image of Caesar as ambitious, influential and excessively powerful. The loathing of Flavius and Murellus towards the new Emperor foreshadow the upcoming conspiracy and the ultimate demise of Caesar.

  5. Sep 2015
    1. Unimaginable, really, that less than two months from now one of his colleagues from abroad, a woman with delicate, birdlike features, will appear at the door to my office and identify herself as a friend of Bob’s. When she asks, I take her down the hall to the room with the long table and then to his empty office. I do this without saying anything, because there’s nothing to say, and she takes it all in with small, serious nods until the moment she sees his blackboard covered with scribbles and arrows and equations. At that point her face loosens and she starts to cry in long ragged sobs. An hour later I go back and the office is empty. When I erase the blackboard finally, I can see where she laid her hands carefully, where the numbers are ghostly and blurred.

      This foreshadows the shooting and gives us this solemn feeling.

  6. Feb 2014
    1. However, the Pythian priestess declared that the Heraclidae would have vengeance on Gyges' posterity in the fifth generation; an utterance to which the Lydians and their kings paid no regard until it was fulfilled

      Hdt. 1.13 The oracle told Gyges that the Heraclidae would have vengeance in the fifth generation and they ignored this until it came true.