8 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Patricio R Estevez-Soto. (2020, November 24). I’m really surprised to see a lot of academics sharing their working papers/pre-prints from cloud drives (i.e. @Dropbox @googledrive) 🚨Don’t!🚨 Use @socarxiv @SSRN @ZENODO_ORG, @OSFramework, @arxiv (+ other) instead. They offer persisent DOIs and are indexed by Google scholar [Tweet]. @prestevez. https://twitter.com/prestevez/status/1331029547811213316

  2. Oct 2020
    1. and serve as pre-prints to work that may live later on, or always exist in their current format

      Thinking of a personal site as a pre-print server is an interesting concept and somewhat similar to the idea of a commonplace book.

  3. Aug 2020
  4. May 2020
  5. Apr 2020
  6. Jun 2018
  7. Mar 2017
    1. If Kriegeskorte is invited by a journal to write a review, first he decides whether he’s interested enough to review it. If so, he checks whether there’s a preprint available—basically a final draft of the manuscript posted publicly online on one of several preprint servers like arxiv and biorxiv. This is crucial. Writing about a manuscript that he’s received in confidence from a journal editor would break confidentiality—talking about a paper before the authors are ready. If there’s a preprint, great. He reviews the paper, posts to his blog, and also sends the review to the journal editor.

      Interesting workflow and within his rights.