24 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. The Guardian: Donald Trump hat Big-Oil Managern angeboten, klimapolitische Maßnahmen der Biden-Administration rückgängig zu machen, wenn sie seinen Wahlkampf mit einer Milliarde Dollar unterstützen. Einer Studie des Guardian zufolge können die Ölkonzerne von Trump vor allem 110 Milliaren Dollar Subventionen (u.a. Steuererleichterungen für neue fossile Projekte) erwarten, die die Biden-Regierung abschaffen will. Hintergrundartikel zu Lobbyisten im US-Ölgeschäft und aktuellen Konflikten<br /> https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/article/2024/may/16/donald-trump-big-oil-executives-alleged-deal-explained

    1. Dichter und sehr gut dokumentierter Überblicksratikel über die Expansionspläne der Öl- und Gasindustrie. Aus unerschlossenen Feldern sollen 230 Milliarden Barrel Öläquivalent gefördert werden - im klaren Widerspruch zum Pariser Abkommen. Durch Ausbeutung neuer Lager werden bis 2025 voraussichtlich 70 Gt CO<sub>2</sub> und damit 17% des Budgets für das 1,5° Ziel ausgestoßen. Eingegangen wird auch auf den Ausstiegsplan des Tyndall Centre. https://taz.de/Run-auf-fossile-Brennstoffe/!5973686/

    1. Der Artikel im Guardian stellt eine neue Studie dar, aus der hervorgeht, wie viel von der bereits existierenden Infrastruktur zur Förderung fossiler Brennstoff stillgelegt werden muss, um das 1,5° Ziel zu erreichen. Dabei geht die Autoren davon aus, dass man CO2 nicht realistisch wieder aus der Atmosphäre entfernen kann, und dass das 1,5° Ziel also nur zu erreichen ist, wenn nicht zu viel emittiert wird. Diese Studie fordert das Gegenteil der Planungen der fossilen Industrien, über der über die der Guardian gerade berichtet hatte. Der Artikel ist auch bemerkenswert, weil er auf eine Reihe weiterer wichtiger Studien zu fossilen Lagerstätten verweist.

  2. Jan 2024
  3. Nov 2023
    1. Economies that are heavily reliant on oil and gas revenues face some stark choices and pressures in energy transitions.
      • for: stats - oil and gas - steep drop in revenues of fossil fuel producer economies

      • stats: oil and gas - steep drop in revenues of fossil fuel reliant economies

        • per capita net income from oil and natural gas among producer economies will be 60% lower in 2030 in a 1.5 °C scenario.relative to revenues between 2010 and 2022.
      • question

        • many producer economies are not diversifying into clean energy fast enough to compensate for these steep revenue drops
    2. A productive debate about the oil and gas industry in transitions needs to avoid two common misconceptions. The first is that transitions can only be led by changes in demand.
      • for: double bind - oil and gas industry committing to clean energy, oil and gas industry - Mexican standoff - SIMPOL

      • comment

        • The oil and gas industry faces the dilemma of the first mover. Nobody wants to take the risk to commit
        • It's a Mexican standoff but maybe SIMPOL is the solution
      • reference

    3. For producers that choose to diversify and are looking to align with the aims of the Paris Agreement, our bottom-up analysis of cash flows in a 1.5 °C scenario suggests that a reasonable ambition is for 50% of capital expenditures to go towards clean energy projects by 2030, on top of the investment needed to reduce scope 1 and 2 emissions.
      • for: stats - oil and gas industry - required investments in clean energy

      • stats: oil and gas industry - required investments in clean energy

        • 50 % of capital expenditure by 2030 and reduction in scope 1 and 2 emissions
      • comment

        • Wow, is it really possible for the industry to spend 50 % of their budget on clean energy in 7 years? This would be unprecedented, given that greenwashing is all we've ever seen in the past.
    4. Some 30% of the energy consumed in a net zero energy system in 2050 comes from low-emissions fuels and technologies that could benefit from the skills and resources of the oil and gas industry.
      • for: stats - oil and gas industry - repurposing for clean energy

      • stats: oil and gas industry - repurposing for clean energy

        • only 30 % of the energy consumed in a clean energy future within 1.5 Deg C comes from low emission fuels and technologies that benefit from oil and gas industry resources
        • this leaves a huge deficit of 70 %.
      • question

        • How will the transition account for these human and technological resources?
    5. Many producers say they will be the ones to keep producing throughout transitions and beyond. They cannot all be right.
      • for: stats - oil and gas industry - fight for survival

      • stats: oil and gas industry - fight for survival

        • competing oil producers will have to reach an agreement on who has the right to produce the remaining carbon budget
        • 24 million barrels a day are still produced in a 1.5 Deg C scenario but are largely uncombusted
          • 75 % of that will be used in petrochemical and other industry
          • 920 billion cubic meters of natural gas
            • 50% of this for hydrogen production
    6. In a scenario that hits global net zero emissions by 2050, declines in demand are sufficiently steep that no new long lead-time conventional oil and gas projects are required. Some existing production would even need to be shut in. In 2040, more than 7 million barrels per day of oil production is pushed out of operation before the end of its technical lifetime in a 1.5 °C scenario.
      • for: stats - oil and gas industry - steep drop in production

      • stats - oil and gas industry - steep drop in production

        • no new fields can be developed to meet a 1.5 Deg C scenario
        • any new developments face the certain risk of being a stranded asset
        • by 2040, 7 million less barrels of oil are produced each day to meet a 1.5 Deg C scenario
    7. The production, transport and processing of oil and gas results in just under 15% of global energy-related greenhouse gas emissions. This is a huge amount, equivalent to all energy-related greenhouse gas emissions from the United States.
      • for: stats - oil and gas industry operational emissions

      • stats: oil and gas industry - operational emissions

        • 15% of all global emissions are from the production, transport and processing of fossil fuels
    8. Oil and gas producers account for only 1% of total clean energy investment globally.
      • for: stats - oil and gas industry - clean energy investments

      • comment

        • Inclusive transformation
          • Clearly, transforming the dirty fossil fuel industry into clean energy industry requires migrating as much of those 12 million dirty energy jobs as possible. We can't alienate the fossil fuel industry.
          • the barometer to measure this paradigm shift in fossil fuel industry narrative is their investment into clean energy. Over the years, majors have acted like politicians, promising significant clean energy investment, then backsliding. There is no more time for that.
    9. This new IEA report explores what oil and gas companies can do to accelerate net zero transitions and what this might mean for an industry which currently provides more than half of global energy supply and employs nearly 12 million workers worldwide.
      • for: stats - oil and gas industry - profit split, stats - oil and gas industry - reserves split

      • stats: oil and gas industry profit split

        • 50 % to governments
        • 40 % to investments
        • 10% to shareholders and debt
      • stats: oil and gas reserve splits

        • majors: 13 % production, 13 % reserves
        • National Oil Companies: 50% production, 60 % reserves
    10. Oil and gas projects currently produce slightly higher returns on investment, but those returns are less stable.
      • stats - oil and gas vs clean energy returns

      • stats: oil and gas vs clean energy returns between 2010 and 2022

        • 6 to 9 % for oil and gas
        • 6 % for clean energy
      • for: IEA 2023 report - exec summary - Fossil Fuel industry, IEA 2023 report - exec summary - Oil and Gas industry

      • summary

        • this is the IEA summary of the position of the Oil and Gas industry and what they must do in order to transition to a net zero world by 2050 and avert 1.5 Deg C global mean temperature.
        • it contains a lot of useful information and statistics
    11. To align with a 1.5 °C scenario, these emissions need to be cut by more than 60% by 2030 from today’s levels and the emissions intensity of global oil and gas operations must near zero by the early 2040s.
    12. The production, transport and processing of oil and gas results in just under 15% of global energy-related greenhouse gas emissions.

      for: stats - oil and gas industry, stats - fossil fuel industry

      • stats: oil and gas industry
      • stats: fossil fuel industry
        • The fossil fuel industry's production, transport and processing operations accounts for 15% of global energy-related greenhouse gas emissions.
    13. Oil and gas producers account for only 1% of total clean energy investment globally.
      • for: stats - oil and gas industry, stats - fossil fuel industry

      • stats - oil and gas industry

      • stats - fossil fuel industry
        • Oil and gas producers account for approximately 1% of total clean energy investment
        • 60 % of that comes from 4 companies
    14. industry which currently provides more than half of global energy supply and employs nearly 12 million workers worldwide.
      • for: stats - oil and gas industry, stats - fossil fuel industry

      • stats - oil and gas industry

      • stats - fossil fuel industry
        • supplies approximately 50% of all total global energy
        • employs 12 million people directly
        • Since 2018, annual revenues average 13 trillion USD
        • revenue split
          • 50 % to governments
          • 40% to investment
          • 10% to shareholders and debt
        • Major oil companies account for 13 % of all reserves
        • National Oil Companies (NOC) account for
          • over 50% of all production
          • close to 60% of all reserves
  4. Jan 2023
    1. you've had problems in your area where you tried to get legislation and the oil and gas industry came in and fought you right in my state same thing every piece 00:44:08 of pro-climate legislation at the national level the regional level the local level Municipal level the oil and gas industry and the coal industry they come in and fight it tooth and nail and 00:44:21 they use their legacy network of political influence and wealth to stop progress the rest of us have to reform these International institutions so that the people of this world and including 00:44:34 the young people of this world can say we are now in charge of our own destiny we're going to stop using the sky as an open sewer we're going to save the future and give people hope we can do it 00:44:47 and remember that political will is itself a renewable resource

      !- oil and gas legislation : industry lawyers at every level

  5. May 2017
    1. Trans-Mountain oil pipeline

      This is a very controversial oil pipeline that runs from Edmonton to Vancouver. This pipeline was built in the 1950s by Kinder Morgan in order to bring oil from Alberta to British Columbia when large oil deposits were discovered. This pipeline had a lot of political drive behind not only from the Canadian government but also the United States who wanted easier oil access on the west coast. The United States was in the middle of the Korean War and wanted to have more secure oil contact. The pipeline had a lot of resistance from other environmentalist groups because it ran through areas that would later be named national parks. However today, there is another pipeline that is being proposed by Kinder Morgan that runs almost parallel to the pre-existing one. The intent of the new pipeline is to bring more oil to the west coast of Canada in order to keep up with the growing oil market in Asia. The new pipeline was approved by British Columbia in January 2017 but the decision immediately faced resistance from the public. Many people are skeptical of a new pipeline because of Kinder Morgan's track record with spills in the past. A journalists from Vancouver writes "British Columbians will continue to fight this decision in the courts and on the streets well past next spring's election." This pipeline is a good example compared to the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline that is in a similar situation right now. There has been a new pipeline proposed there as well that is supported by the oil companies but many citizens and environmental groups are resisting it. "British Columbia nod to pipeline expansion." Oil & Gas News, January 16, 2017. Global Reference on the Environment, Energy, and Natural Resources (accessed May 7, 2017). http://find.galegroup.com/grnr/infomark.do?&source=gale&idigest=6f8f4a3faafd67e66fa023866730b0a1&prodId=GRNR&userGroupName=bucknell_it&tabID=T004&docId=A477938750&type=retrieve&PDFRange=%5B%5D&contentSet=IAC-Documents&version=1.0. "Kinder Morgan - EHS - Pipeline Safety." HOUWWWP1. Accessed May 07, 2017. http://www.kindermorgan.com/pages/ehs/pipeline_safety/default.aspx.

  6. Mar 2017
    1. seismic exploration camps

      Seismic exploration camps are outposts of southern oil and gas exploration activities. They are constructed to shelter scientists during their surveys of the north in search of oil and gas resources. Geologists and related scientists set off explosions to induce waves underground. Theses waves 'echo' off the different layers of material allowing geologists to interpret if/where oil and/or gas could be located.

      Though it is considered a non-invasive way to see into the subsurface when compared to drilling test holes, creating the infrastructure to allow seismic exploration to take pace and setting off explosions takes a toll on arctic ecosystems. In his book Unfreezing the Arctic Andrew Stuhl "This method [seismic] required the use of several tracked vehicles in a caravan, setting off blasts and collecting the data from them, and gashing vast stretches of the Arctic landscape" (Stuhl 114).

      Legacy of this seismic exploration is felt today, as the scars Stuhl references still exist.

      For more information and photos visit: (https://www.fws.gov/refuge/arctic/seismic.html )

      Stuhl, Andrew. Unfreezing The Arctic. 1st ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Print.

    1. The native people have had some hard things to say about the government, about the oil and gas industry and about the white man and his institutions.

      It is no secret that there was a lot of tension between the oil and gas company and the indigenous people of Canada and Alaska. In the 1950's and 1960's there was extensive drilling in areas of Alaska and Canada. Almost all of these decisions were made without consulting with the native people living in these areas. The drilling and exploration of the oil and gas fields had severe impacts on the ecosystem in the region. These impacts included the destruction of habitats from marine and terrestrial wildlife. This created many problems for the Native people who relied on hunting and fishing for a living. The Native people felt slighted by the actions of the oil and gas companies who refused to recognize their claims to the areas. Much of this problem was related to the fact that the Canadian and American governments also did not recognize them as people with claims to the land. The "Inuit in Canada faced a federal government that developed some powers-- in this case, to the territorial rather than the state government-- but nevertheless disregarded Aboriginal rights in the pursuit of Northern development." This stance from the government without a doubt led to the same dismissive attitude from the big oil and gas companies. Eventually, in the 1960's the native groups began to take steps in getting themselves recognized by the government and oil industry. It was through the help of environmental agencies that the native people started to be known. Many environmental agencies made it clear that activities in the Arctic such as oil drilling is extremely detrimental to the ecosystem and that it should not be continued. Many native groups piggy-backed on this stance and made themselves heard on the topic. Through this act both the oil industry and government began to recognize them as a legitimate body.

      Stuhl, Andrew. Unfreezing the Arctic. Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press, 2016.