17 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2021
    1. why do we have an <img> element? Why not an <icon> element? Or an <include> element? Why not a hyperlink with an include attribute, or some combination of rel values? Why an <img> element? Quite simply, because Marc Andreessen shipped one, and shipping code wins.That’s not to say that all shipping code wins; after all, Andrew and Intermedia and HyTime shipped code too. Code is necessary but not sufficient for success. And I certainly don’t mean to say that shipping code before a standard will produce the best solution.

      Shipping code is necessary, but not sufficient for success.

    1. This is the other kind of novelty-seeking web developer, one who seeks to build on the history and nature of the web instead of trying to transform it.
  2. Mar 2021
  3. Jan 2021
    1. Twitter threads gave illness a name and a face, grounding the dread in particular bodies and disparate — if often overlapping — experiences. They placed these experiences in history, creating an archive of disease, fear, rage, and hope that will persist even as these feelings — and some of these people — have passed.

      Archives are only worth their weight in water if interested parties can find what they're looking for. When artifacts aren't gathered and curated into public-facing unities or collections, then history elides them until further notice. These threads are still floating in the sprawl of the Twitterverse, placed into history and drowned out by an ocean of pure, frantic noise. What this piece makes evident to me is the need for restoration: that they need to be resurfaced, preserved, made visible again.

  4. Nov 2020
    1. They are often cited as the first website to feature banner ads.

      If, indeed, Wired invented the banner ad, it is also worth mentioning that wired.com was one of the last websites to be rendered completely unusable by them (when it was still running on the old CMS. idk about now.)

      I love @LaurenGoode and find her insight very worthwhile even in this format, but I really wish the platform on which it now resides (Wired's CMS) wasn't *completely* and *entirely* broken. Chorus should've been a package deal. https://t.co/OweeG30jR6

      — ※ David Blue ※ (@NeoYokel) July 13, 2019
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

  5. Oct 2020
    1. You can add an attribute replace to replace the current entry in the history stack instead of adding a new one.
  6. Jan 2020
  7. Dec 2017
    1. 6. It should be possible to further qualify a reference to a "sublocation" within an object (which would have meaning only to the server that houses it). This is needed, for example, for hypertext-type links. Such a sublocation might be the 25th paragraph of a text, for a hypertext-type pointer.
  8. Nov 2017
    1. Back in 1993, when Eric Bina and I were first building Mosaic, it seemed obvious to us that users would want to annotate all text on the web – our idea was that each web page would be a launchpad for insight and debate about its own contents. So we built a feature called "group annotations" right into the browser – and it worked great – all users could comment on any page and discussions quickly ensued. Unfortunately, our implementation at that time required a server to host all the annotations, and we didn't have the time to properly build that server, which would obviously have had to scale to enormous size. And so we dropped the entire feature.
  9. Oct 2016
    1. Way back in the beginning of time, IBM's OS/2 Warp operating system shipped with a web browser (sorry, I can't remember its name) that would show your browsing history as an outline.
  10. Sep 2015
    1. This is an interesting history of web app and specifically component / styling development at Yandex and the evolution of the BEM methodology.

  11. Aug 2015
    1. It was all envisioned by Sir Tim Berners-Lee 25 years ago

      It's amazing how hard the implementation bit is... :(

      Love the idea. Making it a reality is still ongoing, as I'm sure TimBL knows all too well...

  12. Feb 2015
  13. Sep 2014