21 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. This means that the request had pass to the external network but did not come back...

      Good to know to check if it works well on proxy in this way: Run below command in one terminal: sudo tcpdump -n -i en0 host 8.8.8.8

      And run below command in another terminal: dig @8.8.8.8 www.google.com

  2. May 2021
    1. If you're already an admin for the zone in question, then the proper way to get that information is to log on to the DNS server or DNS control console and read it right from there. If you're not an admin for the zone, you're not supposed to have that information. Note that the person you are talking to on the phone is almost certainly not a DNS zone admin, so they also should not have that information. If they somehow did have it, they definitely shouldn't give it out over the phone. This is for your protection.
    2. DNS zone information is sensitive. Many years ago it was possible for anyone to query a DNS server and literally get back all the records at once, but that was a security issue. Now you have to be an admin for the zone to get that info.
  3. Mar 2021
  4. Dec 2020
    1. CNAME A <domain-name> which specifies the canonical or primary name for the owner. The owner name is an alias.

      The second sentence ruins understanding this definition for me. Does this mean that CNAME is basically an alias, but it is the highest priority one (hence the designation "primary")?

    1. My next move will be to further lower my visibility to 3rd party tracking with a combination of pi-hole caching DNS blocker and wireguard VPN .
  5. Jul 2020
  6. May 2020
    1. Authors of third-party tools should prefix each label key with the reverse DNS notation of a domain they own, such as com.example.some-label.
    1. With a single source IP address it's possible to quickly determine the type of devices on their network, and the social networks they frequent – Google, YouTube, Facebook, Soichat.com, TikTok, Line (a chat application), among many other domains.
  7. Feb 2020
    1. To add insult to injury I learn that when Cloudflare automatically detects an anomaly with your domain they permanently delete all DNS records. Mine won't be difficult to restore, but I'm not sure why this is necessary. Surely it would be possible for Cloudflare to mark a domain as disabled without irrevocably deleting it? Combined with the hacky audit log, I'm left with the opinion that for some reason Cloudflare decided to completely half-ass the part of their system that is responsible for deleting everything that matters to a user.

      ...and this is why some companies should not grow to become too big for the good of their customers.

  8. Oct 2019
  9. Apr 2019
  10. Nov 2018
  11. Oct 2018
  12. Sep 2015
    1. enter a forward to http://www.mydomain.com in the "Forward My Domain" section of the Domain Details tab, rather than setting up something in the Forwards tab