15 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2019
    1. Such sights and sounds were highly blissful to Mr. Parker

      Austen's narration of Sanditon is highly fragmented compared to her other novels. Chapter 4 unfolds with Charlotte as the observer of Mr. Parker's ramblings, but this particular paragraph seems to be free indirect discourse via Mr. Parker's perspective. Austen usually adheres to an interplay of narration between her heroine and the speaker (Ex. Elizabeth of Pride and Prejudice and Fanny of Mansfield Park), yet Sanditon is less defined and balances several different perspectives.

    2. Yes indeed, I am sure we do

      This exchange demonstrates the dynamics that characterize the Parker's relationship. Mr. Parker is domineering, while Mrs. Parker is passive. Austen uses their relationship to explore married life, similar to her characterization of the Gardners of Pride and Prejudice or the Westons of Emma as positive examples, and the Bennetts of Pride and Prejudice as a dysfunctional example.

    3. They were sitting so near each other and appeared so closely engaged in gentle conversation

      Here Austen gives her readers the details of a rather scandalous encounter. In previous novels, the rules of courtship were broken off stage, only to be recounted later (Marianne and Willoughby, Lydia and Wickham, Maria and Henry). However, in this moment, the heroine is the sole witness of an unchaperoned visit, leaving the reader to wonder what plot Austen was planning to develop.

  2. Dec 2018
    1. that masterly style

      Austen pokes fun at this character once again -- he is too cheap to put the maximum effort into pretending to be a Byronic hero.

    2. knew his business

      In these two paragraphs, Sir Edward thinks himself a “Byronic hero” of sorts—albeit an early one, as the poems that cemented the trope were published between 1812 and 1818. The Byronic hero was known for many dark traits, as well as sophistication, education, and the power of seduction, which Sir Edward supposes himself to possess. The Byronic hero was in part inspired by the villains of Ann Radcliffe’s gothic novels. Source.

    3. false principles

      Pretty ironic, considering he was railing on other novels earlier in the chapter for having "discordant principles."

    4. always more anxious

      Here, we are presented another form of a "fan" in Jane Austen's literature -- the crazy fanboy. Sir Edward is somewhat similar to Catherine in Northanger Abbey, but a whole lot creepier.

    5. perversity of judgement

      Jane Austen directly makes fun of Sir Edward for modelling his behavior after male characters like that of Richardson's.

  3. Sep 2017
    1. Because of Charlotte’s disgraceful attitude toward marriage, “all the comfort of intimacy was over” for the two women (P, 174).

      Moe does an excellent job at providing pivotal quotes from the text to support her characterization of Elizabeth and Charlotte's vastly different opinions on marriage. For an introduction, Moe's explanation of their different views to ground her eventual argument is effective, as it draws the reader in, and establishes the validity of her eventual assertions.

  4. Aug 2017
  5. Nov 2016
    1. Mollie, it was true, was not good at getting up in the mornings, and had a way of leaving work early on the ground that there was a stone in her hoof.

      characterization- mollie is very helpless

    1. Benjamin was the oldest animal on the farm, and the worst tempered. He seldom talked, and when he did, it was usually to make some cynical remark — for instance, he would say that God had given him a tail to keep the flies off, but that he would sooner have had no tail and no flies. Alone among the animals on the farm he never laughed. If asked why, he would say that he saw nothing to laugh at. Nevertheless, without openly admitting it, he was devoted to Boxer; the two of them usually spent their Sundays together in the small paddock beyond the orchard, grazing side by side and never speaking.

      characterization

    2. the oldest animal on the farm, and the worst tempered.

      characterization

    3. walking very slowly and setting down their vast hairy hoofs with great care lest there should be some small animal concealed in the straw.

      this show that the horses are thoughtful

    4. highly regarded on the farm

      power and characterization because it shows he must be respectable and would give him trust among the animals