14 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2021
    1. At the Philadelphia Museum of Art, educators train medical students in slow looking to hone their observational skills, but as West notes, it’s not just about noticing small physical details that might inform a diagnosis.

      I'm reminded of the research implied by Arthur Conan Doyle's writing about Sherlock Holmes. We hear about the time and effort spent studying the smallest things, but we don't see it, instead we see the mythical application of it at the "right" times to solve cases in spectacular fashion.

      No one focuses on the time spent studying and learning and instead we mythologize the effects at the other end.

      Another example of this is the fêting of Andrew Wiles's proof of Fermat's last theorem, while simultaneously ignoring the decades of work he poured into studying and solving it not to mention the work of thousands before him to help give him a platform on which to see things differently.

    2. At Slow Art Day events, museums generally ask visitors to look at five objects for 10 minutes each — enough time, often, to keep them looking a little longer. But the practice varies. Jennifer Roberts, an art history professor at Harvard University and a proponent of slow art, has her students look at an individual artwork for three hours. “Approach it as if you were a visitor from another planet with no prior knowledge of the configuration or content of earthly art,” she tells them.

      Why isn't there a slow reading movement that does this with books? What would that look like? What might it accomplish?

    3. This year’s Slow Art Day — April 10 — comes at a time when museums find themselves in vastly different circumstances.

      Idea: Implement a slow web week for the IndieWeb, perhaps to coincide with the summit at the end of the week.

      People eschew reading material from social media and only consume from websites and personal blogs for a week. The tough part is how to implement actually doing this. Many people would have a tough time finding interesting reading material in a short time. What are good discovery endpoints for that? WordPress.com's reader? Perhaps support from feed reader community?

    4. Studies suggest that the average museumgoer looks at an artwork for less than 30 seconds. And with crowds that seem to push you from one piece to the next, overwhelmingly large exhibitions, and a dismal lack of seating options, museum spaces sometimes seem to encourage this “more is more” ethos. But on “Slow Art Day” every April, museums around the world offer programming that guides visitors in looking more patiently.

      What design changes might be instituted to help slow down one's consumption of art?

  2. Oct 2020
  3. Sep 2020
  4. Mar 2020
    1. More information

      In the document "1.2: Creative Commons Today", under the section "Creative Commons: The Movement", I suggest to add, along with other open movements, a mention to Free and Open Source Hardware. The Wikipedia article "Open-source hardware" (CC BY-SA) is quite complete: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open-source_hardware

      Open Harware is a really relevant movement, with includes fantastic projects like RepRap, DIY Book Scanner, and others. And it is fully aligned with the values of Creative Commons and free culture.

  5. Jan 2020
  6. Jun 2019
    1. We attend to the how of research by thinking-with various walking projects from WalkingLab (www.walkinglab.org) and beyond. We use the idea of the walk score as a catalyst for movement. Influenced by the tradition of Fluxus event score

      These ideas harken back to Guy Debord's "derives" and other artistic "happenings"--also 60s era movements. What's up with the back to the past thing? Also, I checked out the WalkingLab.org website and found the projects, events, and publications interesting. It all feels overly ableist to me, but I didn't delve deeply.

  7. Dec 2018
    1. movements, among other things, are attempts to intervene in the public sphere through collective, coordinated action. A social movement is both a type of (counter)public itself and a claim made to a public that a wrong should be righted or a change should be made.13 Regardless of whether movements are attempt-ing to change people’s minds, a set of policies, or even a government, they strive to reach and intervene in public life, which is centered on the public sphere of their time.

      a solid definition of what a movement is

  8. Nov 2018
    1. Digital connectivity reshapes how movements connect, organize, and evolve during their lifespan.
    2. My goal in this book was above all to develop theories and to present a conceptual analysis of what digital technologies mean for how social move-ments, power and society interact, rather than provide a complete empirical descriptive account of any one movement.
  9. Mar 2016