28 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2024
    1. Bruder, Jessica. “Click, Clack, Ding! Sigh ...” The New York Times, March 30, 2011, sec. Fashion. https://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/31/fashion/31Typewriter.html.

    2. “I’m actually not surprised,” Mr. Caro said, when told of the typewriter renaissance. The tangible pleasures of typewriters are something he’s known about for decades. “One reason I type is it simply makes me feel closer to my words,” Mr. Caro said. “It’s like being a cabinetmaker. It’s like laying down the planks. This is the way it’s supposed to feel.”
  2. Apr 2024
    1. reply to u/bastugubbar at https://www.reddit.com/r/typewriters/comments/1ca8nwk/i_for_one_welcome_our_new_taylor_swift_overlords/

      Let's be honest here, the most recent typewriter reference (presumably to that of an ex-boyfriend) is certainly not her first. I'm a modest Swiftie at best (from a trivia perspective), preferring to think of her work as poetry rather than musical pop-culture, so I imagine her more as a quill pen sort of writer, though my notes indicate she does take some of her notes for composition using her cell phone.

      This being said, a few years back she did feature a red Sears Cutlass in All Too Well (10 Minute Version) (Taylor's Version) at the 8:28 mark, which hasn't driven the cost of these through the roof, though I have seen one listed for $1,000 (it unsurprisingly didn't sell for that.) For more here see Robert Messenger at OzTypewriter and Ryan Schocket for Buzzfeed. It's not listed anymore, but this past Christmas, she also had a red typewriter Christmas tree ornament in her online store.

      Those who were privileged to attend the recent Eras Tour (or see it on Disney+) saw groups of typewriters in the background during several songs.

      She's been featuring typewriters for a bit now and it hasn't driven prices through the roof any more than the typewriter renaissance that's been going on for the last few years or so. I suspect that this new round of references isn't going to shift things significantly.

      If she does go full-typewriter, which model(s) do you suspect she'd be using amidst the pantheon of other writers? I'd suggest she may be romantic enough to do a late 40's Smith-Corona Clipper... or perhaps while jet-setting a Skyriter?

      Type on!

    1. Not only does this criticism vastly overrate the power of the written word or the moving image, but it looks past the real forces sending the United States toward ever-deeper division: inequality; a hyperpartisan duopoly; and an antiquated and increasingly dysfunctional Constitution.

      Yes ... and no mention of roots of division in cultural conflicts between paradigms.

  3. Mar 2024
    1. Timur[b] or Tamerlane[c] (8 April 1336[7] – 17–19 February 1405) was a Turco-Mongol conqueror who founded the Timurid Empire in and around modern-day Afghanistan, Iran, and Central Asia, becoming the first ruler of the Timurid dynasty. An undefeated commander, he is widely regarded as one of the greatest military leaders and tacticians in history, as well as one of the most brutal and deadly.[8][9][10] Timur is also considered a great patron of art and architecture as he interacted with intellectuals such as Ibn Khaldun, Hafez, and Hafiz-i Abru and his reign introduced the Timurid Renaissance.[11]

      Timur was a great commander but also a patron of art and architecture (see interactions with Ibn Khaldun)

  4. Feb 2024
  5. Apr 2023
  6. Jan 2023
    1. She undertook some of her research trips under the patronage of Charlotte Osgood Mason, a wealthy socialite and philanthropist who liked to bankroll artists of the Harlem Renaissance — under her strict conditions, which included a precise accounting of every cent.

      The "strict conditions" and "every cent" sound a bit oppressive as called out here, though most funders would/should do this sort of thing.

  7. Dec 2022
    1. In the Admonitio generalis (General admonition), an important collection of legislation issued in 789, the most famous Carolingian ruler, Charlemagne, implored that schools be established for the learning of not only the Psalms, chant, and grammar, but also notae, or ‘written signs.’
  8. Oct 2022
    1. Charlemagne, king of the Franks, issued his capitulary—sometimes called the Charter of Modern Thought—in which he ordered, ‘Letevery monastery and every abbey have its school, in which boys may be taughtthe Psalms, the system of musical notation, singing, arithmetic, and grammar.’
  9. Apr 2022
    1. Under the impact of the Carolingian Renaissance, flori-legia included classical authors as well, often arranged haphazardly in the order in which they were read.

      Florilegia began to include classical authors in addition to biblical passages and those of church fathers due to the influence of the Carolingian Renaissance.

  10. Jan 2022
    1. The Renaissance ob-session for order

      The Renaissance was obsessed with creating hierarchies and imposing order. The Enlightenment was focused on examining and questioning these hierarchies and breaking many of them down.

  11. Jul 2021
    1. Has anyone read The Memory Arts in Renaissance England 16?

      @Josh I'd picked up a copy of this recently and have started into it. The opening is a quick overview of some general history, background, and general techniques.

      The subtitle is solidly accurate of the majority of the book: "A Critical Anthology". The bulk of the book are either translations or excerpts of pieces of memory treatises in English throughout the Renaissance. They also include some history of the texts, their writers, and some analysis of the pieces.

      Some of us have been digging up old editions of books and struggling with reading and creating context. These authors have done yeoman's work on a lot of this and collected some of the more interesting historical works on the memory arts and added lots of context, at least for works in English (and focused on England) during the Renaissance. It's a great text for those interested in the history as well as more readable versions of some of the (often incomprehensible) middle/late English. They also have some analysis often conflicting with statements made by Frances Yates about some of the more subtle points which her broad history didn't cover in detail.

      Given it's anthology nature, its a nice volume to pick up and read self-contained portions of at leisure based on one's interest. It isn't however comprehensive, so, for example, they've got "translated portions" of part of Peter of Ravenna's The Phoenix, but not all of it, though they do outline the parts which they skip over. (Cross reference https://forum.artofmemory.com/t/peter-of-ravenna/27737.) Other segments are only a page or so long and may contain tangential passages or even poems about the art to better situate it for scholars/students looking at it historically.

      I've corresponded a bit with Bill Engel, one of the authors who has been wonderfully helpful. He said he's got another related book Memory and Morality in Renaissance England (Cambridge) coming out later this summer as well as a few other related books and articles thereafter. Some are mentioned on his site: https://www.williamengel.org/.

  12. Sep 2020
    1. Tetzcotzingo insists that the land it-self is the art: works are tied in extri-cably to their sites and materialize organically from it; boundaries between the works and their settings are not clearly marked; dividing lines be-tween the sculpted, the built, and the planted environments (that is, the lines between nature and art, nature and culture)

      Contextualize: Thinking of the land itself as art but also as a thing to sculpt, I think really shows a part of the Aztec culture's want to conquest land. They utilized as much of the land using terraces , water ways, and earthworks to create a culture that majorly influenced by the landscapes around it. everything the land has to offer. On a smaller scale a place that did this was Renaissance park. The designers for that sight decided to not just get rid of the contaminated soil but corralled it into these large mounds that would become a source of recreation, art, and ecological importance.

  13. Mar 2020
    1. Whether their scenario is a historical reenactment (albeit with higher-res images) or a seductive counterfactual, I don’t know. Whether it “matters,” I don’t know. I do know that I am enjoying my fraidy-follows, their slow pulse—people really are blogging, doing the dang thing—and the feeling of an old instinct waking up.
  14. Jan 2020
    1. nouvel humanisme citoyen

      D'où la nécessité d'une « Renaissance » quant à l'urbanisme numérique, dans une culture démocratique promouvant l'accès aux espaces, la maîtrise des outils, la décentralisation de l'économie, l'implication de tous les acteurs dans un projet bienveillant et transparent.

  15. Dec 2019
    1. Orlando

      Celebrated in Italian Renaissance works such as Orlando Innamorato and Orlando Furioso, Orlando, or sometimes Ronaldo, was a knight-errant with a sword named Durendal and a horse named Veillantif. The 1855 epic poem by Robert Browning, Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came was inspired by his tales of chivalry. As a lieutenant of Charlemagne, his great deeds were sung as early as the the eleventh-century in Chanson de Roland.

  16. Feb 2018
    1. n the process of trying to assess Huntington’s views, it occurred to me that what is happening globally today resembles European experience in the Renaissance and Reformation era.

      Similar point argued by Ian Goldin and Chris Kutarna in Age of Discovery: Navigating the Risks and Rewards of Our New Renaissance.

  17. Jun 2017
    1. there was, essentially, no “scientific revolution” during the Renaissance, only a continuation of work that was already happening in the “dark ages” of medieval thought.

      This puts my whole minor field of study thought in question!

  18. Apr 2017
    1. making poetry in the streets

      One of the cool things about signifyin' is how much it blurs boundaries between everyday speech/language practices and things like writing and speeches which have traditionally been the modes of communication that rhetoric scholars have concerned themselves with. High and low culture is very interconnected, which is something we see not just here but I think also in literature of the Harlem renaissance and of modernist literature (might be worth noting that the Harlem renaissance was during modernism).

  19. Dec 2015
    1. Part of Galileo’s genius was to transfer the spirit of the Italian Renaissance in the plastic arts to the mathematical and observational ones.