33 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2021
  2. May 2021
  3. Mar 2021
    1. Yes, Virginia, PMs Are Responsible for Accessibility

      Link to Session

      Angela Hooker, Microsoft

      Why build in a11y from the start?

      • Much easier / less "expensive" than adding it after the fact.
      • PMs are expected to set expectations and manage scope. Set the expectation from the beginning that team delivers accessible product.
      • Consider budget, timeline, people, & other resources. The design phase is "too late."

      Getting support from leadership

      • Talk about ROI & $8+ trillion in disposable income that people with disabilities have worldwide
      • Helps the org be more competitive
      • Show them how inaccessible content hurts. Demo use of product with a screenreader with no visuals, ask them to navigate with keyboard only. If possible, have a person with access needs do that demo.

      Include multiple accessibility reviews in your timeline

      • Team should check their work as they go along

      Choose the standards and level of compliance you'll achieve

      • Compliance and accessibility are not the same. You can conform to WCAG 100% but be unusable for people with certain disabilities
      • If project is used globally, consider laws worldwide. Some countries require specific documentation & standards will vary

      Put accessibility requirements in contracts with outside vendors

      • Be specific about the standards they need to meet
      • Ask for proof they can produce accessible work

      Carefully choose the tech you'll use to build your project

      • If you don't have a choice in what tech you'll use, see if team can fix those a11y issues. If it would expand scope or timeline to do so, flag as risk for leaderships

      Document all your team's work

      • Good to have on hand for showing "good faith effort" to be accessible
      • Prepare a general statement about project's a11y status.
      • Document known a11y issues and create a roadmap for resolving

      Get training for your team

      • Pointing toward info on the web is risky, as there is lots of misinformation. Start with info from W3C a11y curriculum.

      How do you coach your team and oversee their work?

      • Don't make it about any one person. Discourage things like "if we can't make you happy, we can't move forward." It's not about you being happy, it's about putting out the most usable and successful product you can!
      • Publicly praise team members as a way to motivate them to prioritize a11y in the long run

      Written content comes first

      • This is the easiest to remediate, so get this out of the way.
      • Ask people with cognitive impairments to read through with you to find out where things might not be clear

      Working with designers

      • Annotate design docs to indicate to engineering where they'll need to consider a11y
      • Review mockups & wireframes for missing a11y considerations so eng can raise concerns or questions
      • Start with user personas based on people with disabilities
      • Invest in usability testing at several points during project build

      What if you're updating a legacy project?

      • Start small
      • Have an auditor review for a11y and create a plan to give team "quick wins." Create roadmap for remaining items.
      • Talk to team responsible for product to find out what questions/concerns they have
      • Get training & other needed resources for team
  4. Feb 2021
    1. Using integrations with other tools in the product stack such as Jira and GitHub, progress on specific items can be viewed directly from the digital product roadmap, offering an accurate view of how well things are sticking to the schedule

      Why not just use built in tools in Jira and Github? Still struggling to see how roadmapping tool differs from, for example, Github project boards

    2. Translating these concepts into attractive visual product roadmaps that connect with a diverse set of internal stakeholders,

      In a small organization like Hypothesis, I'm not sure that a visually pretty roadmap is a pressing need. Willing to keep reading, but color me skeptical.

  5. Oct 2020
    1. Similarly, we use an opportunity algorithm to quantify which of the customer’s desired outcomes are unmet, and to what degree. A desired outcome statement is a uniquely defined need statement that describes how customers measure success when getting a job done. We assign a number to a desired outcome that indicates whether products or services used in a given market adequately or inadequately serve it.
    1. Yet many teams struggle to achieve a unified way of evaluating what they’ve delivered. Only 1 in 10 have a process for assessing the success or failure of newly-launched products and features.

      we've done this informally, but might consider a more formal approach

    2. For the product teams lacking a systematic way of logging these feature requests, pain points, and other bits of user feedback, a lot of valuable information ends up slipping through the cracks.

      we are working at getting better at this but there is room for improvement

  6. Sep 2020
    1. This last characteristic may be the easiest to evaluate. Unless the position is very junior, I’ll usually hire product managers who’ve actually shipped a product. I mean from start to finish, concept to launch. Nothing is a better indication of someone’s ability to ship great products than having done it before. Past performance is an indication of future success
    2. I always insist that at a minimum, representatives from engineering, design, and marketing meet a potential PM candidate.
    3. I often joke that much of the time your job is to be the advocate for whoever isn’t currently in the room - the customer, engineering, sales, executives, marketing. That means you need to be capable of doing other people’s jobs, but smart enough to know not to. Great PMs know how to channel different points-of-view. They play devil’s advocate a lot. They tend to be unsatisfied with simple answers.
    4. So what do I look for in a PM? Most importantly, raw intellectual horsepower. I’ll take a wickedly smart, inexperienced PM over one of average intellect and years of experience any day. Product management is fundamentally about thinking on your feet, staying one step ahead of your competitors, and being able to project yourself into the minds of your colleagues and your customers.
    1. 2. Develop specific superpowers — don’t just rely on being a smart generalist.

      Bring something to the table. Could be solid design skills in my case (which I don't have yet)

    1. Whatever the future intentions of the PM, one thing remains for certain: this position is at the intersection from where founder strategy, user feedback, development team management, and market awareness come together. From what’s been said, it certainly appears that this is not a role that you “fall” into, but rather could aspire to be in.
    2. What’s more, to be a good PM, individuals also need to understand that it’s all about the bigger picture. Great managers “win” games, meaning that it’s not about getting a product out the door, but by ensuring that over the long-term, the team helps solve a larger problem. Nash says it’s not about getting an “E for effort” and brush off things that don’t work.
    3. The product manager isn’t the one that’s just sitting around overseeing the various teams and seeing whether it’s on track to meet the scheduled delivery or launch date. They are the ones who need to understand the market and that means knowing who the competitors are, what consumers want, and being able to help the marketing and sales teams better target them.
    1. More tactically,helping your team often means being the person who writes and summarizes notes after a long meeting, or writing a spec to make sure you have captured the team’s consensus and plan in written form.
      • Write notes after meeting and share with team.
    2. A lot of people describe a product manager as a CEO of the product or the “owner” of the spec, but I think that over-ascribes influence and authority to the product manager. The best teams operate in a way where the team collectively feels ownership over the spec and everyone has had input and been able to suggest and promote ideas. The best product managers coordinate the key decisions by getting input from all team members and are responsible to surface disagreements, occasionally break ties, and gather consensus (or at least ensure that everyone commits to a plan) when decisions get made.

      "CEO" of the product is an overrated term to describe PM.

      • Everybody on the team should feel heard/collective ownership
    3. Great product managers understand the very tricky balance between getting it right and getting it out the door.

      Balance between ship/get right = good product manager

    4. While shipping matters, the best product managers help the team make sure it’s the right product. Building something that doesn’t exist yet is always fun, but never a slam dunk.

      *

    5. More importantly, once shipped, the best product managers can measure whether the product shipped is the right one. They should work closely with the team to make sure the right moments in the product are measurable, and that the hard questions about whether people are really using the product can be answered.

      Once shipped good PM's know how to measure success fo the product

    6. Great product managers listen to user feedback all the time — whether it’s from usability tests, meeting users in the field, reading support emails or tweets, or working with the people in your company who do all of those things on a daily basis.

      *

  7. Nov 2019
  8. Oct 2019
    1. But your customers are not the exclusive source of product feedback. Some of the most valuable suggestions for improvement can also appear during initial sales calls with prospects, internal evaluation of new features in your organization, and during design research and quality assurance motions.

      customer feedback and usage data is often presented as the gold standard for feedback re: product development - interesting to see other sources mentioned here

    1. “Say you’re trying to test whether people like pizza. If you serve them burnt pizza, you’re not getting feedback on whether they like pizza. You only know that they don’t like burnt pizza. Similarly, when you’re only relying on the MVP, the fastest and cheapest functional prototype, you risk not actually testing your product, but rather a poor or flawed version of it.”
  9. Oct 2017
    1. product manager as a technical, user-focused team leader working closely with engineers and designers to guide products

      Short definition of what is a Product Manager

    1. Now, in the long run great product management usually makes the difference between winning and losing, but you have to prove it. Product management also combines elements of lots of other specialties - engineering, design, marketing, sales, business development. Product management is a weird discipline full of oddballs and rejects that never quite fit in anywhere else. For my part, I loved the technical challenges of engineering but despised the coding. I liked solving problems, but I hated having other people tell me what to do. I wanted to be a part of the strategic decisions, I wanted to own the product. Marketing appealed to my creativity, but I knew I’d dislike being too far away from the technology. Engineers respected me, but knew my heart was elsewhere and generally thought I was too “marketing-ish.” People like me naturally gravitate to product management.

      This describes me! This is me! This is why I am a Product Manager.

  10. Nov 2016
  11. Sep 2016
    1. frame the purposes and value of education in purely economic terms

      Sign of the times? One part is about economics as the discipline of decision-making. Economists often claim that their work is about any risk/benefit analysis and isn’t purely about money. But the whole thing is still about “resources” or “exchange value”, in one way or another. So, it could be undue influence from this way of thinking. A second part is that, as this piece made clear at the onset, “education is big business”. In some ways, “education” is mostly a term for a sector or market. Schooling, Higher Education, Teaching, and Learning are all related. Corporate training may not belong to the same sector even though many of the aforementioned EdTech players bet big on this. So there’s a logic to focus on the money involved in “education”. Has little to do with learning experiences, but it’s an entrenched system.

      Finally, there’s something about efficiency, regardless of effectiveness. It’s somewhat related to economics, but it’s often at a much shallower level. The kind of “your tax dollars at work” thinking which is so common in the United States. “It’s the economy, silly!”

  12. Dec 2015