4 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2017
    1. thermal degradation of the permafrost

      Thermal degradation is the process of the breaking of molecules due to heating (Zeus). In Arctic regions, thermal degradation can occur to permafrost. This can lead to uneven snowmelt and ground instability (Grandpre). The ground instability affects any infrastructure built on permafrost, including roads, buildings, or piping systems. Uneven melting of the permafrost can create holes or indentations in roadways. A study by the Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences in 2011 showed that heat transfer from groundwater movement can increase the rate of thermal degradation of permafrost. In areas where wildfires are prevalent, thermal degradation of permafrost is an even greater issue (Jafarov). Climate change effects change the patterns and prevalence of forest fires. A study performed for Environmental Research Letters found that under conditions of severe fire in an upland forest where no other climate change effects are present, 18 meters of permafrost can degrade in 120 years. In lowland forests, permafrost is more resilient to thermal degradation and these effects were not found. Wildfires affect permafrost because they burn the organic layer of soil and the rate of permafrost melt is directly impacted by how much of the organic layer is burned. If a thick organic soil layer is present and the fire is short-lived, the permafrost may not melt. Climate change also increases the rate of thermal degradation in permafrost. Temperatures in northern high latitude regions are expected to rise by 2.5 to 7 degrees Celsius. The thermal degradation of permafrost is important not only due to increased carbon emissions in the air and oceans, but also for its negative effects of infrastructure.

      References: Grandpré, Isabelle De, Daniel Fortier, and Eva Stephani. "Degradation of permafrost beneath a road embankment enhanced by heat advected in groundwater." Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences. August 01, 2012. Accessed May 06, 2017. http://cjes.geoscienceworld.org/content/49/8/953.

      Jafarov, E. E., V. E. Romanovsky, H. Genet, A. D. McGuire, and S. S. Marchenko. "The effects of fire on the thermal stability of permafrost in lowland and upland black spruce forests of interior Alaska in a changing climate." Environmental Research Letters 8, no. 3 (August 27, 2013). Accessed May 06, 2017. http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/8/3/035030/pdf.

      "Thermal Degradation of Plastics." Zeus Industrial Products Inc. 2005. Accessed May 06, 2017.

  2. Oct 2016
    1. But what about the pleasures of the world and all the myriad pursuits that are undertaken to acquire them, to keep them and to ward off their dissipation? What of these? Clearly, given the excesses that you see about you, the pursuit of pleasure can be seen as utterly destructive and demeaning. Examples of this are so common and take so many forms that you need but look at human life around you to see their many expressions.
  3. Jun 2015
    1. If you want a DIY version of this, try ImageMagick's compare command: compare bag_frame1.gif bag_frame2.gif compare.gif Documentation: http://www.imagemagick.org/Usage/compare/ reply no_gravity 2 hours ago Interesting. And to render the html you can use cutycapt. Which is in the Debian repos too. I just tried it, and this rendered a nice diff of two pages for me: cutycapt --url=http://www.xyz.com/1 --out=1.png cutycapt --url=http://www.xyz.com/2 --out=2.png compare 1.png 2.png diff.png reply easytiger 2 hours ago Now make it a webservice and charge $200/month! reply programmernews3 1 hour ago First part already done: http://archive.is/ reply prottmann 1 hour ago apt-get install the services and use them on my server ;-) reply

      Plain and simple way to report visual degradation of website or webapp

  4. Jan 2015