18 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2022
  2. Jun 2022
    1. And with hope, we can change the world.

      Each human being is born sacred. We each enter the world without pre-conceptions, filters or biases. We certainly do not enter the world with hatred or animosity. As scientist Gerald Edelman once said, we come into an undivided world. There is no division, there is only an experience of nature experiencing herself through a human body, a human form.

      This initial embodiment of the sacred is transformed by culture's and introduced by culture's leading agent, our mother. She first introduces us to language and enculturates us into the world of other humans like us. And along the road of life, the diverse environments individual human beings find themselves (ourselves) in can cause us to stray from embodying the sacred as a living principle to the same degree as that first moment of birth.

      In this moment of our collective human history, when the project of civilization building reveals a fundamental flaw and we are tasked to undo our impact on the natural world as exponentially quickly as we have damaged it, rekindling awe may be our final saving grace. For we need something extraordinary to turn things around at this point, and that extraordinary is something that has always been inside of each of us.

      In the human-created world which now fills us with anguish, reminding each of us that we are sacred, returning to our primordial roots as being incarnations of nature herself, can accelerate system change in the nonlinear way now required.

    2. It’s as if we need the gravitational pull of both worlds to keep us on track, locked on a good and righteous path. Without both worlds pulling on us, we would crash into one, or simply lose our way, hurtling through the universe on our own, intersecting nothing, helping no one.

      As neuroscietist Beau Lotto points out, the Anthropocene is creating greater and greater uncertainty and unpredictability, but the one human trait evolution has created to help us deal with this is the sense of awe. See my annotation on Beau Lotto's beautiful TED Talk: How we experience awe and why it matters https://hyp.is/go?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdocdrop.org%2Fvideo%2F17D5SrgBE6g%2F&group=world

      In short, the sacred is the antidote to the increase in uncertainty and unpredictability as we enter into the space of the Anthropocene. Awe can be the leverage point to the ultimate leverage point for system change that Donella Meadows pointed out many years ago- it can lead to rapid shift in paradigms, worldviews and value systems needed to shift the system.

    1. Burning in the Endless Freedom of Space

      Nature (including human nature) is sacred from the smallest to the largest scale and every scale in between

    1. So where can we find awe, given how important it is? So, what if ... A suggestion: that awe is not just to be found in the grandeur. Awe is essential. 00:13:26 Often, it's scale -- the mountains, the sunscape. But what if we could actually rescale ourselves and find the impossible in the simple? And if this is true, and our data are right, then endeavors like science, adventure, art, ideas, love, a TED conference, performance, 00:13:57 are not only inspired by awe, but could actually be our ladders into uncertainty to help us expand.

      the sacred is all around us when we begin to truly open our eyes and APPRECIATE the gift of simply BEing! Then we can be in a constant state of wonder, awe and in tune with the sacred as a living principle. This is the journey from scared-to-sacred. It is the transformation that Donella Meadows spoke about which can lead to the most impactful whole system change.

    2. But it's so essential that we go to this place that our brain gave us a solution. Evolution gave us a solution. And it's possibly one of the most profound perceptual experiences. And it's the experience of awe.

      Awe / wonder (getting in touch with the sacred) is evolutions solution to helping us transition! This is in alignment with the essence of the open source Deep Humanity praxis - helping individuals to rediscover the sacred, to transform life back into a living experience of awe and wonder so that we may bring about an individual tipping point in each of us, and collective tipping point in global society to accelerate the transition.

      ...moving from the scared back to the sacred

    3. (Music) (Applause) (Music) (Applause) (Music) 00:07:16 (Applause) (Cheers) (Applause) Beau Lotto: Ah, how wonderful, right? So right now, you're probably all feeling, at some level or another, awe.

      BEing journey that inspires awe, wonder and the invocation of the sacred.

  3. Apr 2022
    1. that's just the story of how we transfer knowledge and how we preserve that knowledge and move it around and even when it's taken from us and we can find it 00:53:56 we go and we sing that song and we sing that spirit out of there and so this is what's important about transmission of knowledge for for us and so that knowledge they don't belong 00:54:09 to us

      Uncle Ghillar Michael Anderson told a story of how his mob went into a museum and transferred the knowledge from sacred objects in the museum and then took the spirts out of there and moved them back in country. The curators didn't understand the process at all or how they had corrupted the sacred objects.

  4. Mar 2022
    1. that although evil exists, people aren’t born evil. How they live their lives depends on what happens after they’re born

      So very true. Monsters are made, not born. Everyone is born into the sacred, but then life can transform the sACred into the sCAred. Pathological fear can motivate a host of pathological responses such as selfishness, alienation, greed, anger, control, abuse, othering,dehumanization, etc.

  5. Oct 2021
    1. Interview with Erik Adigard about our collaboration on the eleprocon epiphany since its inception back in 1979 and thoughts since then. Sitting outside the original Dolphin Farm Studio where genesis ignited.

      Each day, there seem to be so many epiphanies. That shift in awareness feels overwhelming. I’m not sure what to do with these realizations, as the next right thing is often uncertain and ambiguous. Charles Eisenstein is drawing me into an exploration of sacred economics.

    1. On Saturday, October 9, after our World Weavers conversation on the topic Matter is Derivative of Consciousness, I was exploring Value Village, a thrift store in Chilliwack, with my wife, Jayne. I came across a book that fits with the theme for our World Weavers conversation on October 23: Shifting from an attention economy to an intention economy.

      Sacred Economics

      By Charles Eisenstein

      Sacred money, then, will be a medium of giving, a means to imbue the global economy with the spirit of the gift that governed tribal and village cultures, and still does today wherever people do things for each other outside the money economy.

      Sacred Economics describes this future and also maps out a practical way to get there. Long ago I grew tired of reading books that criticized some aspect of our society without offering a positive alternative. Then I grew tired of books that offered a positive alternative that seemed impossible to reach: “We must reduce carbon emissions by 90 percent.” Then I grew tired of books that offered a plausible means of reaching it but did not describe what I personally, could do to create it. Sacred Economics operates on all four levels: it offers a fundamental analysis of what has gone wrong with money; it describes a more beautiful world based on a different kind of money and economy; it explains the collective actions necessary to create that world and the means by which these actions come about; and it explores the personal dimensions of the world-transformation, the change in identity and being that I call “living in the gift.”

      (Page XIX)

  6. May 2021
    1. “Monetising what we see as sacred knowledge, our way of being – driving, walking – is sacred knowledge and the only people who should have any purview over that is our community. … What if we look at what the data could do for our community and how to achieve that? … We are gathering our data because we love our people, we want a better future for the next generations. What if all data was gathered for those reasons? What would it look like?”

      A great quote and framing from Abigail Echo-Hawk.

      This reliance on going to community elders (primarily because they have more knowledge and wisdom) is similar to designing for the commons and working backward. Elders in many indigenous cultures represent the the commons.

      This isn't to say that we shouldn't continue to innovate and explore the evolutionary space for better answers, but going slow and fixing things is far more likely to be helpful than moving fast and breaking things as has been the mode for the last fifteen years. Who's watching the long horizon in these scenarios?

      This quote and set up deserves some additional thought into the ideas and power structures described by Lynne Kelly in Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies Orality, Memory and the Transmission of Culture

  7. Jan 2019
    1. experiment and improvisation might.

      Indeed, it might. Might it not?

      I'm not being coy or trying to build my annotation count, I'm after something in particular here. Here, experiment and improv are suggested because they might lead to progress. My question is: What fencepost does the posthumanist leave unmoved? Is anything sacred? Is anything best left alone, without being subject to "experiment and improvisation?"

  8. Nov 2017
    1. The beauty of the almond in bud, blossom, and fruit gave motif to sacred and ornamental carving.

      This is interesting!

  9. Jun 2017
  10. Dec 2015