39 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2024
    1. A religious experience (sometimes known as a spiritual experience, sacred experience, mystical experience) is a subjective experience which is interpreted within a religious framework.[1] The concept originated in the 19th century, as a defense against the growing rationalism of Western society.[2] William James popularised the concept.[2] In some religions, this may result in unverified personal gnosis.[3][4]

      Religious experience (also mystical) emerged as a concept in te 19th century due to the dominant discourse of rationalism in the West.


      See William James, but also Rilke who had a religious experience when going to Russia (and probably many others).

    1. Coogan, Michael David, Marc Zvi Brettler, Carol Ann Newsom, and Pheme Perkins, eds. The New Oxford Annotated Bible: New Revised Standard Version with Apocrypha, An Ecumenical Study Bible. Fully Revised Fourth. 1962. Reprint, New York: Oxford University Press, 2010.

      Annotations URL: urn:x-pdf:d8e0b658bbb0af5343bfb78eec4546f9

      Alternate annotations view: https://jonudell.info/h/facet/?user=chrisaldrich&max=100&exactTagSearch=true&expanded=true&url=urn%3Ax-pdf%3Ad8e0b658bbb0af5343bfb78eec4546f9

  2. Dec 2023
    1. we as a society do…. Stuff to get money
      • for: money - enabling transaction with strangers, adjacency - money - othering

      • adjacency between

        • money
        • othering
        • competition
        • sacred
      • adjacency statement
        • in exchange for MY labour, I have access to the fruits of others
        • how much money your can get used how much resource produced by others you can get
        • we accumulate money for ourselves and don't share much with others
        • othering is built into the use of money ,- the artificial scarcity of money puts us all in competition with each other for a scarce resource
        • competition is othering
        • by default, the economic game is about grabbing the most resources for self
        • hence it is facing a direction AWAY from the sacred
        • it intrinsically does not treat all others a equally sacred
        • it promotes an every-person-for themselves attitude
  3. Nov 2023
    1. when Jimmy greets 00:15:11 anybody he's greeting someone anybody made in the image of God he's looking into the face of God he's looking at somebody with the in a soul of infinite value and dignity he's looking at somebody so important that 00:15:24 Jesus was willing to die for that person now you could be Christian Jewish Muslim Muslim Buddhist atheist agnostic I don't care but greeting each person you meet with that level of reverence and respect 00:15:36 is a precondition for seeing them well
      • for: good story - everyone is sacred
    2. why is all this happening well I could tell a bunch of stories one of them would be the 00:09:16 technology story social media is driving us crazy one would be a sociology story we're not as involved in Civic Life as we used to be wouldn't be an economic story there's more in income inequality than there used to be and so we leave 00:09:27 desperate lives but the story I emphasize is the most direct which is we become sadder and meaner because we don't treat each other with the consideration that we deserve and treating each other with 00:09:41 consideration and Reserve we deserve
      • for: treating each other as sacred, recognizing the sacred, quote - not recognizing the sacred

      quote: not recognizing the sacred - we've become sadder and meaner because we don't treat each other with the consideration that we deserve

    1. In what follows, I argue that the restraint or “bracketing” that characterizes thephenomenological epoche can facilitate an understanding of the radical alterity of the sacred andof the others who experience the sacred.
      • for: epoche - application - harmonizing radical alterity of the sacred.

      • comment

        • this would be an invaluable tool for Deep Humanity analysis
  4. Oct 2023
    1. Jacob took the stone (ʼben) and “set it up as a pillar (massebah) and poured oil on the top of it” (Genesis 28:18). This standing stone was dedicated to Yahweh, therefore the use of a stone as a massebah was not forbidden.

      Jacob's use of a stone as a massebah wasn't forbidden because it was dedicated to Yahweh.

    2. There are several occasions where the massebah is not associated with pagan worship. When the massebah is associated with the worship of Yahweh, the massebah is accepted as a valid expression of commitment to Yahweh.

      Massebah for pagan worship: - Exodus 23:24 (https://hypothes.is/a/r3m5QmyDEe6SC8eLYcJE1Q) - Hosea 10:1 (https://hypothes.is/a/4PK2GGyDEe6wZg_r2YpVCA ) - 2 Kings 18:4 - 2 Kings 23:14

      Massebah for worship of Yahweh: - Genesis 28:18 Jacob's pillow (https://hypothes.is/a/NF5p8Gx6Ee65Rg_J4tfaMQ)<br /> - Genesis 31:44-45 Jacob and Laban's covenant - Exodus 24:4 - Joshua 24:25-27

    3. in violation of the demands of the covenant, the people of Israel erected sacred stones dedicated to other gods (Hosea 10:1). In their religious reforms, both Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:4) and Josiah (2 Kings 23:14) destroyed the sacred pillars which the people of Israel had dedicated to the worship of Baal.
    4. During the establishment of the covenant between Yahweh and Israel, the people were commanded to destroy the sacred stones of the Canaanites, “You must demolish them and break their sacred stones (masseboth) to pieces” (Exodus 23:24).

      In neighboring cultures in which both have oral practices relating to massebah, one is not just destroying "sacred stones" to stamp out their religion, but it's also destroying their culture and cultural memory as well as likely their laws and other valuable memories for the function of their society.

      View this in light also of the people of Israel keeping their own sacred stones (Hosea 10:1) as well as the destruction of pillars dedicated to Baal in 2 Kings 18:4 and 2 Kings 23:14.

      (Link and) Compare this to the British fencing off the land in Australia and thereby destroying Songlines and access to them and the impact this had on Indigenous Australians.

      It's also somewhat similar to the colonialization activity of stamping out of Indigenous Americans and First Nations' language in North America, though the decimation of their language wasn't viewed in as reciprocal way as it might be viewed now. (Did colonizers of the time know about the tremendous damage of language destruction, or was it just a power over function?)

    5. Absalom set up a massebah for himself as a memorial for he said, “‘I have no son to keep my name in remembrance’; he called the massebah by his own name” (2 Samuel 18:18).

      Use of massebah for remembrance of a name...

      Potentially used for other factors? translation? context?

      See also: https://hypothes.is/a/oqgH4mx9Ee68_dMgihgD0A (Rachel's massebah in Genesis 35:19-20)

    6. When Rachel died, Jacob set up a massebah at her grave; “it is the massebah of Rachel’s tomb, which is there to this day” (Genesis 35:19–20).

      Use of a standing stone or massebah (pillar) to mark a grave in Genesis 35:19-20.

      Certainly could have been other than to simply mark a location and may have been used to mark and remember the knowledge of Rachel as well as the family's experiences with Rachel, a practice which is still commonplace when visiting burial locations.

    7. Israel was forbidden to set up sacred stones, pillars: “you shall not set up a pillar (massebah), which the LORD your God hates” (Deuteronomy 16:22).

      Relationship to the first two commandments against worshiping other gods and the use of idols?

      How does this relate to the standing stone found in the room at Khirbet Qeiyafa from the time of David?

      Dates of this text with respect to Khirbet Keiyafa?

    8. The pillars or sacred stones were stones set apart for religious use. The word massebah comes from the Hebrew word nasab, a word which means “to stand.”
  5. Sep 2023
    1. We use the term"canonical" to refer to such books; in an older tradition wemight have called them "sacred" or "holy," but those wordsno longer apply to all such works, though they still apply tosome of them.

      they provide a broader definition of sacred/holy texts that extend to books which form the basis of a groups' identity and often involve orthodoxy.

      relation to politics, gender identity, cults, etc.

  6. Aug 2023
    1. But it's so essential that we go to this place that our brain gave us a solution. Evolution gave us a solution. And it's possibly one of the most profound perceptual experiences. And it's the experience of awe.

      -for: awe, wonder, Deep Humanity, inner transformation, transition, inner/outer transformation, social tipping point, individual tipping point - Awe / wonder (getting in touch with the sacred) is evolutions solution to helping us transition into the unknown - This is in alignment with the essence of the open source Deep Humanity praxis - helping individuals to rediscover the sacred, to transform life back into a living experience of awe and wonder - Deep Humanity's purpose is to rekindle awe so that - we may bring about an individual tipping point, and collectively, - collective tipping point in global society to accelerate the transition out of the polycrisis

      ...moving from the scared back to the sacred

  7. Jul 2023
    1. the sense of something sacred that is 00:11:00 very real but beyond everyday language
      • the sense of something sacred

      • comment

        • Deep Humanity alignment
  8. Feb 2023
    1. For years inventions have extended man's physical powers rather than the powers of his mind.
  9. Jan 2023
    1. That religious experience, the moment of my hand in the water, is with me always.  Always I see the profusion of relationships, of connections, of ideas, of possibilities, as a great net across the world, across every subject, across everything.   All my philosophical thoughts since then derive from that insight in the rowboat,

      !- sacred : in n every moment - the equanimity of reality - is that all appearances are sacred - of we have the insight of the profundity of this moment, it can translate to all other moments of life

    1. the first things that I think is important to understand from our perspective we've been taught Through the Ages that every life form on the face of the planet has its proper place as divinely ordained by our Almighty 00:31:03 Creator when one looks to the human body and the complexities every so has an importance and Chief Seattle taught us that all things are connected what we do 00:31:15 to the Earth we do to ourselves we are but one strand in a very complex Web of Life and our ancestors also foretold of a Day of Reckoning and we are in that 00:31:27 Day of Reckoning right now

      !- Indigenous Wisdom : all living beings are sacred - we are in a time of reckoning

    1. Such relational practices of recognition avow that concern and respect are due to others as persons of inherent, not simply instrumental, worth.

      !- inherent worth : each person is sacred !- comment : treating ALL human (and non-human) beings as sacred and not just transactional or instrumental is a key starting point - practice of Deep Humanity

  10. Aug 2022
  11. Jun 2022
    1. And with hope, we can change the world.

      Each human being is born sacred. We each enter the world without pre-conceptions, filters or biases. We certainly do not enter the world with hatred or animosity. As scientist Gerald Edelman once said, we come into an undivided world. There is no division, there is only an experience of nature experiencing herself through a human body, a human form.

      This initial embodiment of the sacred is transformed by culture's and introduced by culture's leading agent, our mother. She first introduces us to language and enculturates us into the world of other humans like us. And along the road of life, the diverse environments individual human beings find themselves (ourselves) in can cause us to stray from embodying the sacred as a living principle to the same degree as that first moment of birth.

      In this moment of our collective human history, when the project of civilization building reveals a fundamental flaw and we are tasked to undo our impact on the natural world as exponentially quickly as we have damaged it, rekindling awe may be our final saving grace. For we need something extraordinary to turn things around at this point, and that extraordinary is something that has always been inside of each of us.

      In the human-created world which now fills us with anguish, reminding each of us that we are sacred, returning to our primordial roots as being incarnations of nature herself, can accelerate system change in the nonlinear way now required.

    2. It’s as if we need the gravitational pull of both worlds to keep us on track, locked on a good and righteous path. Without both worlds pulling on us, we would crash into one, or simply lose our way, hurtling through the universe on our own, intersecting nothing, helping no one.

      As neuroscietist Beau Lotto points out, the Anthropocene is creating greater and greater uncertainty and unpredictability, but the one human trait evolution has created to help us deal with this is the sense of awe. See my annotation on Beau Lotto's beautiful TED Talk: How we experience awe and why it matters https://hyp.is/go?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdocdrop.org%2Fvideo%2F17D5SrgBE6g%2F&group=world

      In short, the sacred is the antidote to the increase in uncertainty and unpredictability as we enter into the space of the Anthropocene. Awe can be the leverage point to the ultimate leverage point for system change that Donella Meadows pointed out many years ago- it can lead to rapid shift in paradigms, worldviews and value systems needed to shift the system.

    1. Burning in the Endless Freedom of Space

      Nature (including human nature) is sacred from the smallest to the largest scale and every scale in between

    1. (Music) (Applause) (Music) (Applause) (Music) 00:07:16 (Applause) (Cheers) (Applause) Beau Lotto: Ah, how wonderful, right? So right now, you're probably all feeling, at some level or another, awe.

      BEing journey that inspires awe, wonder and the invocation of the sacred.

  12. Apr 2022
    1. that's just the story of how we transfer knowledge and how we preserve that knowledge and move it around and even when it's taken from us and we can find it 00:53:56 we go and we sing that song and we sing that spirit out of there and so this is what's important about transmission of knowledge for for us and so that knowledge they don't belong 00:54:09 to us

      Uncle Ghillar Michael Anderson told a story of how his mob went into a museum and transferred the knowledge from sacred objects in the museum and then took the spirts out of there and moved them back in country. The curators didn't understand the process at all or how they had corrupted the sacred objects.

  13. Mar 2022
    1. that although evil exists, people aren’t born evil. How they live their lives depends on what happens after they’re born

      So very true. Monsters are made, not born. Everyone is born into the sacred, but then life can transform the sACred into the sCAred. Pathological fear can motivate a host of pathological responses such as selfishness, alienation, greed, anger, control, abuse, othering,dehumanization, etc.

  14. Oct 2021
    1. Interview with Erik Adigard about our collaboration on the eleprocon epiphany since its inception back in 1979 and thoughts since then. Sitting outside the original Dolphin Farm Studio where genesis ignited.

      Each day, there seem to be so many epiphanies. That shift in awareness feels overwhelming. I’m not sure what to do with these realizations, as the next right thing is often uncertain and ambiguous. Charles Eisenstein is drawing me into an exploration of sacred economics.

    1. On Saturday, October 9, after our World Weavers conversation on the topic Matter is Derivative of Consciousness, I was exploring Value Village, a thrift store in Chilliwack, with my wife, Jayne. I came across a book that fits with the theme for our World Weavers conversation on October 23: Shifting from an attention economy to an intention economy.

      Sacred Economics

      By Charles Eisenstein

      Sacred money, then, will be a medium of giving, a means to imbue the global economy with the spirit of the gift that governed tribal and village cultures, and still does today wherever people do things for each other outside the money economy.

      Sacred Economics describes this future and also maps out a practical way to get there. Long ago I grew tired of reading books that criticized some aspect of our society without offering a positive alternative. Then I grew tired of books that offered a positive alternative that seemed impossible to reach: “We must reduce carbon emissions by 90 percent.” Then I grew tired of books that offered a plausible means of reaching it but did not describe what I personally, could do to create it. Sacred Economics operates on all four levels: it offers a fundamental analysis of what has gone wrong with money; it describes a more beautiful world based on a different kind of money and economy; it explains the collective actions necessary to create that world and the means by which these actions come about; and it explores the personal dimensions of the world-transformation, the change in identity and being that I call “living in the gift.”

      (Page XIX)

  15. May 2021
    1. “Monetising what we see as sacred knowledge, our way of being – driving, walking – is sacred knowledge and the only people who should have any purview over that is our community. … What if we look at what the data could do for our community and how to achieve that? … We are gathering our data because we love our people, we want a better future for the next generations. What if all data was gathered for those reasons? What would it look like?”

      A great quote and framing from Abigail Echo-Hawk.

      This reliance on going to community elders (primarily because they have more knowledge and wisdom) is similar to designing for the commons and working backward. Elders in many indigenous cultures represent the the commons.

      This isn't to say that we shouldn't continue to innovate and explore the evolutionary space for better answers, but going slow and fixing things is far more likely to be helpful than moving fast and breaking things as has been the mode for the last fifteen years. Who's watching the long horizon in these scenarios?

      This quote and set up deserves some additional thought into the ideas and power structures described by Lynne Kelly in Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies Orality, Memory and the Transmission of Culture

  16. Jan 2019
    1. experiment and improvisation might.

      Indeed, it might. Might it not?

      I'm not being coy or trying to build my annotation count, I'm after something in particular here. Here, experiment and improv are suggested because they might lead to progress. My question is: What fencepost does the posthumanist leave unmoved? Is anything sacred? Is anything best left alone, without being subject to "experiment and improvisation?"

  17. Nov 2017
    1. The beauty of the almond in bud, blossom, and fruit gave motif to sacred and ornamental carving.

      This is interesting!

  18. Jun 2017
  19. Dec 2015