15 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2020
    1. Competition exists when there is comparison, and comparison does not bring about excellence.

      Disagree. It does once you master the "Inner Game" the way John Galway explains it. Competition then is your ally to find the best version of yourself. To do things you did not think you could because your opponent helped you bring this out of you. And so it is in Aikido and value of a good opponent.

    1. This is a great time to individualize instruction and have students work at different paces. You don’t want 100-120 papers coming at you all at one time. Spread it out, and it will keep you from getting short-tempered with your students.

      As the educational system operates today, many teachers easily put in 60 hours of work per week. But when you teach remotely, it sounds like work becomes much more manageable.

      Do I want to become a teacher? If I can teach like this I do—and no, not because it seems easier but because it seems easier AND more effective.

    2. For my more advanced students, they need to learn research skills: how to locate, evaluate, and use information. Online learning offers great opportunities for that, including with what’s going on in the news right now.

      ...how to function independently in the world too.

    3. Then there is the option of getting students to talk to each other online on discussion boards and videoconferences. Some students adapt to it quickly and like it. Some don’t, because it feels impersonal. You have to be patient with that and give them some time and space to adjust.

      Introverts v extroverts. Oil and water. They've always differed, always will. Maybe this virtual, personalized learning movement will finally allow introverts to stop feeling so defeated in the presence of extroverts who live so much more loudly than they do. Finally, they'll be able to live peacefully in their own mind, undisturbed by the stress of feelings like you need to be more extroverted to fit in.

      Btw: I'm not encouraging each party to distance themselves from each other all the time. What I am saying is that when value is trying to be distributed, distribute it however it'll best be received. Then, later, once teaching time is over, they can socialize in traditional ways... IF that's what they want to do.

    4. Rizga: How have you been translating this online?Moore: It depends on the student. Some students work very well asynchronously. They are very comfortable working alone on a draft; I make color-coded comments in a word document or their PDF, and then I send it back. Some students need me to explain things to them in person before I send them the comments; we’ll do a video or audio chat. Others need even more interaction: I’ll hook them up to a videoconference, and we’ll go through all the comments together. Some students I need to refer to a grammar-brushup program or a YouTube video on how to do some of the mechanical stuff like uploading papers online.

      Sounds like Mrs. Moore deserves a raise! This woman knows what's up! She represents the future while living in a community that (probably) latches on to tradition.

      Any of you big city school systems reading this? If you are, hire her. You can probably pay her less than what your other teachers are earning and still give her a bump in pay compared to what she's earning in Mississippi.

    5. The other big issue is that many of the teachers don’t have the skills to teach online.

      Sorry, but this begs the question...

      Should teachers who don't have the skills to teach online be teaching at all? If they can't, they're either not qualified for the job or they're unwilling to put in the effort required to learn.

    6. We are in the midst of the most sweeping education experiment in history. The coronavirus pandemic has forced the majority of the U.S.’s 3.6 million educators to find ways to teach without what most of them consider the core part of their craft—the daily face-to-face interactions that help them elicit a child’s burning desire to investigate something; detect confusion or a lack of engagement; and find the right approach, based on a student’s body language and participation in the classroom, to help students work through their challenges.

      There's a reason education fails so often: teachers teach students as if they all have identical interests and learning styles.

      There's no such thing as a one-size-fits all solution to any problem. Everyone knows that. Even dumb people do. Yet there are our educators, the people we're supposed to depend on to set the table for our lives, to show us what's important, what we she commit to memory for the rest of our life or else that life's gonna die having led a dumb life, because you didn't do what you were told to do way back when: understand everything the teacher told you to understand, yeah, even if you didn't give a fuck about what's coming out of her mouth. Learn that shit anyway.

      Oh, and learn it how I say you should learn it too. Sit in that seat, lock your eyes on me, and take notes at a speed that's equal to or faster than the rate of my speech... just like all the students around you are (trying) to do... because everyone learns new information in the same way... right?

    7. Then, you have to think about accessibility issues. How will my vision-impaired and deaf students access it? Have I put everything in print? Do I have to put in some audio? There are whole series of checks you have to do for different access issues.

      Sure, new problems will surface. But so will solutions. And hopefully, in the end, there will be fewer problems using the new approach than the old.

  2. Jun 2019
  3. Apr 2019
    1. Having our children memorize facts and figures, sit passively in class, and take mundane standardized tests completely defeats the purpose.

      To learn with enjoyment, we need to have the space to explore, experiment and fail. We need to have ownership, empowerment and the ability to be creative in the process.

    2. how much of what I learned was never actually useful later in life, and how many of my critical lessons for success I had to pick up on my own

      How relevant is the content education delivers for real-life scenarios?

      I have been there too, most of the relevant lessons and knowledge I have discovered myself in a inquisitive and curiosity quest to learn and understand more.

    1. D. Christopher Brooks, Director of Research, and Mark McCormack, Senior Director of Analytics & Research, at EDUCAUSE bring together this comprehensive report that outlines Higher Education trends for 2019. This report does feel more technical in nature, but they bring it together in a way that is laid out to be reader friendly. The 20-year technology predictions are valuable and there is a focus on using the report to plan for the future.

      Rating: 10/10

  4. Nov 2018
    1. “The day is upon us where we need to strongly consider nurse practitioners and physician assistants as equal in the field,” he says. “We’re going to find a much better continuity of care for all our patients at various institutions with hospital medicine and … a nurse practitioner who is at the top of their license.”

      Hospitalists as QB should play leadership role in integrating all members of care team

    1. Beyond the Frame: The New Classroom

      In this video a discussion of how the school system is broken but cost billions of dollars. 9 billion dollars a year is spent of textbooks that become outdated the minute they are printed according to the author.

      With the new generation of learners, virtual reality will be embracing how most learners learn the best by visual means and not by reading.

      This video short impactfully presents how VR will change the face of education.

      RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  5. Sep 2016
    1. We commonly look at Ivy League institutions as the standard of higher education in America, but the truth is that the majority of the nation's workforce, innovation identity and manufacturing futures are tied to those institutions which graduate outside of the realm of high achievers from wealthy families.