25 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2018
    1. You don't understand: You a jazz musician by default. And that just opened me up.

      I adore this, b/c this is one powerful aspect of literacy IN ACTION. The writer (artist, performer, singer, etc.) is doing something, feels it intuitively. Then a teacher, or peer or fellow collaborator helps them to name what they are doing. Call it author's craft, or technique, or approach. But it invites the learner/actor to do deeper into their craft and join the discourse of actors before them.

    2. It starts there first, before I even heard any type of melody or lyric. That's just DNA

      This is flat out a paen to absorbing literacies through the early experiences with our families and communities, but especially, especially our parents. Kendrick says it himself, his parents sharing their culture made his glorious unfolding possible.

  2. Nov 2017
    1. In a recent interview he remarked about his home and lifestyle, "This is West Oakland, man. This is the bottoms right here."

      This area of West Oakland is known as the "Lower Bottoms". It is possible that the meaning of "bottoms" here is simply Stalin referring to the neighborhood by name.

  3. Sep 2017
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  5. Jul 2017
  6. Jun 2017
  7. Dec 2016
    1. You gotta go for what you knowMake everybody see, in order to fight the powers that beLemme hear you sayFight the Power

      This shows how Public enemy started a physical movement among the people. Many took to the streets to participate in non-violent protests for the cause. Many were forced to hear what they had to say and there was a push for change. Public Enemy never wanted the protest to be violent, they just wanted change.

  8. May 2015
    1. When Rap Genius received their Series A round of fundraising–$15 million from Andreessen Horowitz–

      Here's how Andreessen himself explained the investment, annotated on (Rap) Genius. After this investment, Genius pivoted slowly from annotating lyrics to, like hypothes.is, annotating the web.

  9. Sep 2014
    1. Amicus brief in Anthony Douglas Elonis v. United States, including a long section describing the origins and history of hip hop, calling for the court to take serious caution when ruling on the actual or real intent to harm communicated (or not) by potentially hyperbolic lyrics and braggadocio.

    2. What level of knowledge of rap and understanding of its complicated conventions is a defendant-speaker to assume, in advance of communication, that a hypothetically reasonable person possesses in order to properly understand a rap message? Because the answer is anything but clear and because a speaker’s First Amendment rights should not hang on what amounts to guesswork about an audience’s hypothetically reasonable knowledge of a complex artistic and political genre of expression, the actual subjective intent of the defendant-speaker must be considered in both the First Amendment and statutory true threats analyses.
  10. Sep 2013
    1. that while those who are thought to be adept in court procedure are tolerated only for the day when they are engaged in the trial, the devotees of philosophy are honored and held in high esteem in every society and at all times; that, furthermore, while the former come to be despised and decried as soon as they are seen two or three times in court, the latter are admired more and more as they become better and more widely known; and, finally, that while clever pleaders are sadly unequal to the higher eloquence, the exponents of the latter could, if they so desired, easily master also the oratory of the court

      This reminds me of "MC versus rapper". "An MC is a representative of Hip-Hop culture. A Rapper is a representative of corporate interests. An MC can be a rapper, but a rapper will never be an MC." -KRS ONE