9 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2019
  2. Dec 2018
    1. Scientists say they believe that the reptiles may reabsorb parts of their skeleton in order to decrease their size and increase their chances of survival on a smaller diet.

      This is one of the strangest things I have come across! It is thought to be the only adult vertebrate able to do this. More at this site.

    2. marine iguanas, the only lizard that scours the ocean for food.

      This four minute BBB Video about marine iguanas is crazy--they cliff dive, then go down thirty feet, and stay there for ten minutes grazing on algae! https://youtu.be/tO_9zm9tsCs

    1. The iguanas are hugely affected as a result, but quite remarkably the iguana’s body reacts by shrinking in size until food sources increase, as smaller bodies require less energy. There is no other known case in the world in which an adult vertebrate is able to shrink, particularly in which it does so repeatedly. Scientists believe that the iguana actually consumes its bones to stay alive, resulting in a reduced skeleton.

      A strange and wonderful adaptation!

  3. Sep 2017
    1. One of the main spots the large rays frequent is around a set of stairs that descend into the ocean. It’s where local fishermen toss back any unwanted fish and so the area has become a harbor hot spot where many sea creatures stop by hoping to find an easy meal.

      Wow!

  4. Aug 2017
    1. Deep in the Pacific Ocean, scientists may have discovered a ghostly new species of snailfish. Snailfish are the deepest dwelling vertebrates on Earth. Some live over 5 miles below the surface. This one was observed at a depth of 1.5 miles, in the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. It’s possible this is the first time it’s ever been observed by humans.

      Cool!

  5. Apr 2017
    1. Once upon a time, the seas teemed with mackerel, squid and sardines, and life was good. But now, on opposite sides of the globe, sun-creased fishermen lament as they reel in their nearly empty nets.

      This should be sounding loud warning bells!

  6. Mar 2017
    1. Beaufort Sea Project

      The Beaufort Sea Project for Climate Change began as a research project in Canada in 2002. The project was started by Magdalena A.K. Muir and Geographic Information System (GIS) specialists with support from the Fisheries and Joint Management Committee and governmental organizations. The focus of the project from 2002 to 2007 was to study the effects of climate change on marine mammals and fish in the Beaufort Sea. In conjunction, the research studied the effects of using, managing, and allocating marine resources. After 2008, the research has focused on identifying species of marine wildlife that could be at risk in the future due to overfishing and climate change related effects. This research continues to study the effects of climate change on the health of marine species and management of marine resources. The management of these resources includes gaining species knowledge, setting limits on the number of marine mammals and fish that are allowed to be captured and killed per year, and enforcing legislature about managing marine resources. Specifically, researchers are studying the effects of climate change in marine mammal migrations patterns. The specific environmental effects are changes in the fresh water Mackenzie River inputs, sea and land ice, and water circulation. Researchers plan to use these changes to catalogue direct effects of climate change on migration. Sea and land ice changes will be detrimental to ice dependent animals. This research will provide information for scientists, researchers, organizations, charities, and government officials so that appropriate laws and regulations can be established (Muir n.d.).

      Source:

      Muir, Magdalena A.K. "Beaufort Sea Project for Climate Change." Arctic Institute of North America. Accessed March 05, 2017. http://arctic.ucalgary.ca/beaufort-sea-project-climate-change.

  7. Jan 2017
    1. to show how the design changes depending on the depth. The nearer to the surface you get, the more protection—armour—you need to withstand potential disturbances from shipping.

      Hahaha! This is a bit counter-intuitive, is it not? One would think you would need ”bigger” cables as the depth increases, because of the pressure.