17 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2020
    1. In particular, if you set this parameter to true, our solution creates a technical cookie on iubenda.com (domain) which is used when the cookie on the local domain is not found.
    1. It may be the case that several sufficient conditions, when taken together, constitute a single necessary condition (i.e., individually sufficient and jointly necessary)
    2. being a male is a necessary condition for being a brother, but it is not sufficient—while being a male sibling is a necessary and sufficient condition for being a brother
    3. in order for human beings to live, it is necessary that they have air
    1. A real-world example of this would be an e-commerce site that allows users to “hold” items in their cart while they’re using the site or for the duration of a session. In this scenario, the technical cookies are both necessary for the functioning of the purchasing service and are explicitly requested by the user when they indicate that they would like to add the item to the cart. Do note, however, that these session-based technical cookies are not tracking cookies.

      I'm not sure I agree with this:

      [the technical cookies] are explicitly requested by the user when they indicate that they would like to add the item to the cart.

      The only thing they requested was that the item be held in a cart for them. They didn't explicitly request that cookies be used to store information about items in the cart. They most likely don't understand all of the options for how to store data like this, and certainly wouldn't know or expect specifically that cookies be used for this.

      In fact, localStorage could be used instead. If it's a single-page app, then even that would be necessary; it could all be kept in page-local variables until they checked out (all on the same page); such that reloading the page would cause the cart data held in those variables to be lost.

  2. Apr 2020
    1. purposes are grouped into 5 categories (strictly necessary, basic interactions & functionalities, experience enhancement, measurement, targeting & advertising)
    2. Strictly necessary (id 1). Purposes included:Backup saving and managementHosting and backend infrastructureManaging landing and invitation pagesPlatform services and hostingSPAM protectionTraffic optimization and distributionInfrastructure monitoringHandling payments
  3. Mar 2020
    1. The exemption to the consent requirement only clearly applies to non-tracking technical cookies strictly necessary for the functioning of services that were expressly requested by the user. A real-world example of this would be an e-commerce site that allows users to “hold” items in their cart while they’re using the site or for the duration of a session. In this scenario, the technical cookies are both necessary for the functioning of the purchasing service and are explicitly requested by the user when they indicate that they would like to add the item to the cart.
    1. When you visit your favorite online store, you expect the items you add to your shopping cart to still be in your shopping cart when you check out. Cookies make that happen. If you opted out of those cookies, you would, in essence, be opting out of the very reason you went to that site in the first place. Asking a customer if they want to allow cookies to make their shopping cart work would be like asking them if they want the thread to keep their shirt together.
    2. In fact, some are essential for the proper functioning of a website. The EU understands this and makes an exception for cookies that are "strictly necessary" to fulfill the services requested by your site visitors.
    1. While we recognise that analytics can provide you with useful information, they are not part of the functionality that the user requests when they use your online service – for example, if you didn’t have analytics running, the user could still be able to access your service. This is why analytics cookies aren’t strictly necessary and so require consent.
  4. Feb 2020
  5. Oct 2013
    1. It follows, then, that the only necessary parts of a speech are the Statement and the Argument. These are the essential features of a speech; and it cannot in any case have more than Introduction, Statement, Argument, and Epilogue.