14 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2019
  2. Oct 2018
    1. When students are shown quick techniques for judging the veracity of a news source, they will use them. Regardless of their existing beliefs, they will distinguish good sources from bad sources.

      https://webliteracy.pressbooks.com/

  3. Jul 2018
    1. For one, much of the new research centers on U.S. politics and, specifically, elections. But social networks drive conversations about many other topics such as business, education, health, and personal relationships. To battle bad online information, it would be helpful to know whether people respond to these sorts of topics differently than they respond to information about political candidates and elections. It also would be useful to know whether myths about certain subjects — for instance, a business product or education trend — are trickier to correct than others.
  4. May 2018
  5. Nov 2017
    1. when Americans get news online, they increasingly reach for a smartphone (55%), with computer use falling significantly

      Does this impact the quality of the news people receive? News on a phone would have less depth, and possibly trend towards clickbait. Is it more personalized, more subject to algorithmic interference?

    1. the figure is just 53 percent when people are asked specifically about the news that they themselves use

      This bears further investigation. Is it low by historical standards? If so, might it be a result of marketing efforts by media outlets, as they try to distinguish themselves from the competition?

  6. Apr 2017
    1. 1) No one can even agree on a definition of “fake news,” even though a ridiculous number of words are being spent trying to define it.2) Folks don’t seem to understand the evolving nature of the problem, the way that manipulation evolves, or how the approaches they propose can be misused by those with whom they fundamentally disagree.3) No amount of “fixing” Facebook or Google will address the underlying factors shaping the culture and information wars in which America is currently enmeshed.
  7. Mar 2017
    1. Teaching students to separate fact from fiction has become a priority after an election in which false "news" played a large role.

      Incredibly important right now.

  8. Jan 2017
    1. Did Media Literacy Backfire?

      Media literacy asks people to raise questions and be wary of information that they’re receiving. People are. Unfortunately, that’s exactly why we’re talking past one another.

      ...

      Addressing so-called fake news is going to require a lot more than labeling. It’s going to require a cultural change about how we make sense of information, whom we trust, and how we understand our own role in grappling with information.

  9. Sep 2015
  10. www.schooljournalism.org www.schooljournalism.org
    1. ASNE

      American Society of News Editors=possible partner/funder

    2. news literacy curriculum

      I like this idea a lot. Annotation seems as though it could play a major role here.

    3. John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the Robert R. McCormick Foundation and the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation.

      Funders of this theme.