20 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2021
    1. An NFT is a crypto-token on a blockchain. The token is virtual — the thing you own is a cryptographic key to a particular address on the blockchain — but legally, it’s property that you can buy, own or sell like any other property.

      It's already caused society a lot of harm to treat corporations as people. Turning digital assets into property seems like a similar mistake in the making.

  2. Feb 2021
    1. Source maps eliminate the need to serve these separate files. Instead, a special source map file can be read by the browser to help it understand how to unpack your assets. It "maps" the current, modified asset to its "source" so you can view the source when debugging. This way you can serve assets in development in the exact same way as in production.
    1. When Sprockets was introduced, one of the opinions that it held strongly, is that assets such as CSS and JS should be bundled together and served in one file.
    2. The alternative was to have multiple scripts or stylesheet links on one page, which would trigger multiple HTTP requests. Multiple requests mean multiple connection handshakes for each link “hey, I want some data”, “okay, I have the data”, “alright I heard that you have the data, give it to me” (SYN, ACK, SYNACK). Even once the connection is created there is a feature of TCP called TCP slow start that will throttle the speed of the data being sent at the beginning of a request to a slower speed than the end of the request. All of this means transferring one large request is faster than transferring the same data split up into several smaller requests.
  3. Nov 2020
    1. obviously it's too late, but it's a good practice to keep the 3rd party dependencies mirrored in your own infrastructure :) There is NO GUARANTEE that even a huge site (like launchpad for downloading DEBs) won't go down over a period of time.
  4. Sep 2020
  5. Jul 2020
    1. While stylesheets can be reworked relatively easily with AMP by inlining the CSS, the same is not true for JavaScript. The tag 'script' is disallowed except in specific forms. In general, scripts in AMP are only allowed if they follow two major requirements: All JavaScript must be asynchronous (i.e., include the async attribute in the script tag). The JavaScript is for the AMP library and for any AMP components on the page. This effectively rules out the use of all user-generated/third-party JavaScript in AMP except as noted below.
    2. The problem is that this is an external stylesheet reference. In AMP, to keep the load times of documents as fast as possible, you cannot include external stylesheets.
  6. Jun 2020
  7. May 2020
    1. Mozilla does not permit extensions distributed through https://addons.mozilla.org/ to load external scripts. Mozilla does allow extensions to be externally distributed, but https://addons.mozilla.org/ is how most people discover extensions. The are still concerns: Google and Microsoft do not grant permission for others to distribute their "widget" scripts. Google's and Microsoft's "widget" scripts are minified. This prevents Mozilla's reviewers from being able to easily evaluate the code that is being distributed. Mozilla can reject an extension for this. Even if an extension author self-distributes, Mozilla can request the source code for the extension and halt its distribution for the same reason.

      Maybe not technically a catch-22/chicken-and-egg problem, but what is a better name for this logical/dependency problem?

  8. Mar 2020
    1. How do you leverage browser cache when Google’s very own Analytics.js has it’s expiry time set to 2 hours? How do you minimize DNS requests when Google advices you to copy their tracking code, linking to an externally hosted Javascript file?If that isn’t bad enough already, Google’s advice is to avoid hosting the JavaScript file locally. And why? To ensure you get access to new features and product updates.
    2. Why should I host analytics.js locally?The Complete Analytics Optimization Suite for WordPress gives you the best of both worlds. After activation it automagically downloads the latest version of analytics.js from Google’s servers, places the necessary tracking code in your WordPress theme’s header and keeps the local Javascript file up-to-date using an adjusted version of Matthew Horne’s update analytics script and wp_cron(). This way you can minimize DNS requests, leverage browser cache, track your visitors and still follow Google’s recommendation to use the latest features and product updates.
  9. Oct 2019
  10. Jan 2019