6 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2018
  2. instructure-uploads.s3.amazonaws.com instructure-uploads.s3.amazonaws.com
    1. oneconsistinginthementionofactualpastfacts,theotherintheinventionoffactsbythespeaker.()fthelatter.again,therearetwovan'eties,theillustrativeparalle

      Douglass draws an illustrative parallel to facts of the past when he references the decline of Babylon and uses this parallel to invoke empathy by demonstrating that the celebratory moment of the Fourth of July is built on the suffering of many. Douglass says, “Fellow-citizens; above your national, tumultuous joy, I hear the mournful wail of millions! whose chains, heavy and grievous yesterday, are, to-day, rendered more intolerable by the jubilee shouts that reach them.” Although, some may dispute that the Biblical reference is an actual event (that is an entirely different discussion), for Douglass this parallel is effective because it also appeals to the religious beliefs of the free Americans. It demonstrates the hypocrisy of the actions by the very white men who have invited him to speak to them. On one hand, the freemen appear to be inclusive of slaves because they invited Douglass to speak; on the other hand, they must not forget that this extraordinary jubilee does not include the speaker himself. This inductive technique must lead the freemen to reevaluate their own beliefs and should lead to recognition of how they are a shame before all men and before God.

  3. Sep 2017
    1. convenient & proper part of the State for the University of Virginia.

      While I'm not exactly surprised by the general modern assininity of historic perspectives, it is rather striking to me how parallel this particular phrase is to one in the Constitution, i.e., the necessary and proper clause, or the elastic clause. It makes me wonder whether or not they used this as an excuse to establish whatever they pleased on site. Although eminent domain did not exist in the US officially at the time, and Virginia had a tendency to be ever so slightly anarchistic towards the wealthy, this does pose the question of how the poorer folk in the area got off with the changes, as well as how the university's establishment served as a political tool.

  4. Mar 2017
  5. Sep 2015
    1. Architects continue to be fascinated with finding and describing parallels between symbolic structures and architectural forms.

      As mentioned by someone else in a previous comment, the red archway on Whittier College's campus is supposedly a "symbolic structure" and its architectural characteristics offer an interesting representation of something that looks flexible, but is in fact extremely rigid. What could be relatable to this?