11 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2019
    1. “sharing economies” of collaborative consumption(Botsman & Rogers, 2010), where people offer and share underuti-lized resources in creative, new ways.

      Gives a clear definition of what is the sharing economy

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  2. Oct 2018
  3. Apr 2017
    1. Of course, if you want to put a positive spin on this kind of work, you can call it flexible, decentralized micro-entrepreneurship. But pan out, and it looks more like feudalism, with thousands of small subsistence farmers paying tribute to a baron that grants them access to land they don’t own.
  4. Jul 2016
    1. Within the workings of the informal economy bullying and violence is rife. The harshness of these conditions, and the sword of damocles of deportation, is precisely why this labour is so cheap, and so many businesses opt for it. Bullying makes workers subservient, and scares them away from industrial organising (although there are now amazing unions now fighting for workers in these sectors - the IWGB, IWW, and UVW.) It is not just those businesses that do well out of this exploitation. It makes things cheaper for everyone, and oils the cogs of the whole economy. Many people are happy to reap this work’s benefits without ever taking responsibility for the suffering it causes. 
    1. Uber is synonymous with its “surge pricing” policy—when cars are scarce and rides in high demand, users are warned that the cost of a ride may be much higher than normal. It’s then up to them whether to pay the premium or find another way to get where they’re going.
    1. The showdown in Austin highlights a paradox for cities and citizens as peer-to-peer platforms like Uber and Lyft extend their operations. Their wide-reaching outreach campaigns mimic the style of local politics, waging attacks and appealing to and seeking our support as “constituents.” But in practice, their actions don’t necessarily represent our best interests.
    1. Luca and his colleagues found requests with African American sounding names were roughly 16 percent less likely to be accepted than their white-sounding counterparts. They found discrimination across the board: among cheap listings and expensive listings, in diverse neighborhoods and homogenous neighborhoods, and with novice hosts as well as experienced hosts. They also found that black hosts were also less likely to accept requests from guests with African American-sounding names than with white-sounding ones.
  5. Jan 2016
    1. Chelsea Rustrum

      The term "sharing economy" was stolen a few years ago, by firms that aren't sharing anything.

      The technology of these platforms is not expensive to build. Meanwhile, these companies have skyrocketing valuations (exceeding even the growth trajectory of Facebook) because they are absorbing value from the people actually creating and providing the value.

      Everyone on the Internet is being exploited without noticing.

      "Our personal data is not unlike labor -- you don’t lose by giving it away, but if you don’t get anything back you’re not receiving what you deserve. Information ... is inherently valuable."

      An economy where workers get fair exchange for the value they produce is possible. Rustrum points out these means:

      • Cooperatives. In particular, platform coops
      • ESOP, employee stock ownership plans
      • Crowd funding
      • Blockchain - digital peer-to-peer secure transactions
    1. A “sharing economy,” by definition, is lateral in structure. It is a peer-to-peer economy. But Uber, as its name suggests, is hierarchical in structure. It monitors and controls its drivers, demanding that they purchase services from it while guiding their movements and determining their level of earnings. And its pricing mechanisms impose unpredictable costs on its customers, extracting greater amounts whenever the data suggests customers can be compelled to pay them.This is a top-down economy, not a “shared” one.

      The true sharing economy is about things like sharing unused tools and resources, community property, and combining purchasing power. (People should not say "there is no such thing" when pointing out that Uber, Lyft, and Airbnb are not examples.)

  6. Dec 2015