43 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2021
  2. Jul 2021
    1. Revisiting this essay to review it in the framing of digital gardens.

      In a "gardens and streams" version of this metaphor, the stream is flow and the garden is stock.

      This also fits into a knowledge capture, growth, and innovation framing. The stream are small atomic ideas flowing by which may create new atomic ideas. These then need to be collected (in a garden) where they can be nurtured and grow into new things.

      Clippings of these new growth can be placed back into the stream to move on to other gardeners. Clever gardeners will also occasionally browse through the gardens of others to see bigger picture versions of how their gardens might become.

      Proper commonplacing is about both stock and flow. The unwritten rule is that one needs to link together ideas and expand them in places either within the commonplace or external to it: essays, papers, articles, books, or other larger structures which then become stock for others.

      While some creators appear to be about all stock in the modern era, it's just not true. They're consuming streams (flow) from other (perhaps richer) sources (like articles, books, television rather than social media) and building up their own stock in more private (or at least not public) places. Then they release that article, book, film, television show which becomes content stream for others.

      While we can choose to create public streams, but spending our time in other less information dense steams is less useful. Better is to keep a reasonably curated stream to see which other gardens to go visit.

      Currently is the online media space we have structures like microblogs and blogs (and most social media in general) which are reasonably good at creating streams (flow) and blogs, static sites, and wikis which are good for creating gardens (stock).

      What we're missing is a structure with the appropriate and attendant UI that can help us create both a garden and a stream simultaneously. It would be nice to have a wiki with a steam-like feed out for the smaller attendant ideas, but still allow the evolutionary building of bigger structures, which could also be placed into the stream at occasional times.

      I can imagine something like a MediaWiki with UI for placing small note-like ideas into other streams like Twitter, but which supports Webmention so that ideas that come back from Twitter or other consumers of one's stream can be placed into one's garden. Perhaps in a Zettelkasten like way, one could collect atomic notes into their wiki and then transclude those ideas into larger paragraphs and essays within the same wiki on other pages which might then become articles, books, videos, audio, etc.

      Obsidian, Roam Research do a somewhat reasonable job on the private side and have some facility for collecting data, but have no UI for sharing out into streams.

    1. Alan Jacobs seems to be delving into the area of thought spaces provided by blogs and blogging.

      In my view, they come out of a cultural tradition of commonplace books becoming digital and more social in the the modern era. Jacobs is obviously aware of the idea of Zettelkasten, but possibly hasn't come across the Sonke Ahrens' book on smart notes or the conceptualization of the "digital garden" stemming from Mike Caulfield's work.

      He's also acquainted with Robin Sloane, though it's unclear if he's aware of the idea of Stock and Flow.

  3. Jun 2021
  4. May 2021
    1. The conversational feed design of email inboxes, group chats, and InstaTwitBook is fleeting – they're only concerned with self-assertive immediate thoughts that rush by us in a few moments.

      The streamification of the web had already taken hold enough by this point. Anil Dash had an essay in 2012 entitled Stop Publishing Web Pages which underlined this point.

  5. Apr 2021
    1. What you want is not to detect if stdin is a pipe, but if stdin/stdout is a terminal.

      The OP wasn't wrong in exactly the way this comment implies: he didn't just ask how to detect whether stdin is a pipe. The OP actaully asked how to detect whether it is a terminal or a pipe. The only mistake he made, then, was in assuming those were the only two possible alternatives, when in fact there is (apparently) a 3rd one: that stdin is redirected from a file (not sure why the OS would need to treat that any differently from a pipe/stream but apparently it does).

      This omission is answered/corrected more clearly here:

      stdin can be a pipe or redirected from a file. Better to check if it is interactive than to check if it is not.

    1. This question does not show any research effort; it is unclear or not useful Bookmark this question. Show activity on this post. I'm trying to filter the output of the mpv media player, removing a particular line, but when I do so I am unable to control mpv with the keyboard. Here is the command: mpv FILE | grep -v 'Error while decoding frame' When I run the command, everything displays correctly, but I am unable to use the LEFT and RIGHT keys to scan through the file, or do anything else with the keyboard. How do I filter the output of the program while retaining control of it?
    2. Quite a lot of programs actually detect if their output goes to a file (e.g. try man | grep -F a and you will not be able to scroll back and forth).
    1. i found that for the osx host "gonzo" , the vanished files (not the warning message itself) appear in stdout - for linux hosts they _both_ appear in stderr , but nothing in stdout (rsync.err.#num is stderr, rsync.log is stdout)
  6. Feb 2021
    1. Stream presents us with a single, time ordered path with our experience (and only our experience) at the center.

      And even if we are physically next to another person, our experience will be individualized. We don't know what other people see, nor we can be sure we are looking at each other.

    2. In the stream metaphor you don’t experience the Stream by walking around it and looking at it, or following it to its end. You jump in and let it flow past. You feel the force of it hit you as things float by. It’s not that you are passive in the Stream. You can be active. But your actions in there — your blog posts, @ mentions, forum comments — exist in a context that is collapsed down to a simple timeline of events that together form a narrative.

      This describes exactly what frustrates me the most about online discussions. Especially on Twitter, it is so hard to build coherence on previous (and future) insight.

  7. Nov 2020
    1. logInfoToStdOut (boolean) (default=false) This is important if you read from stdout or stderr and for proper error handling. The default value ensures that you can read from stdout e.g. via pipes or you use webpack -j to generate json output.
  8. Oct 2020
    1. Maintaining a website that you regard as your own does require maintenance. Like a garden, you may choose to let a few weeds flourish, for the wildlife, and you may also seek to encourage volunteers, for the aesthetics. A garden without wildlife is dull, a garden without aesthetics is pointless.
    1. I love the general idea of where he's going here and definitively want something exactly like this.

      The closest thing I've been able to find in near-finished form is having a public TiddlyWiki with some IndieWeb features. Naturally there's a lot I would change, but for the near term a mixture of a blog and a wiki is what more of us need.

      I love the recontextualization of the swale that he proposes here to fit into the extended metaphor of the garden and the stream.

    1. User topics must be created and manually managed ahead of time

      Javadoc says: "should be created".

      The reason is: Auto-creation of topics may be disabled in your Kafka cluster. Auto-creation automatically applies the default topic settings such as the replicaton factor. These default settings might not be what you want for certain output topics (e.g., auto.create.topics.enable=true in the Kafka broker configuration).

  9. Sep 2020
    1. the gentlemen who make a business and a living out of writing books

      When the narrator switches into first-person in this new sentence, I wonder if it’s really Collins speaking - especially when he mentions “the gentlemen who make a business and a living out of writing books”; Is this a stream of consciousness (similar to Woolf?)? Can it be measured quantifiably? To me, streams of consciousness, while sometimes inarguably clear, always have something to do with the readers and how they view themselves, a factor that seems so subjective and wildly varying from person to person.

  10. Jun 2020
  11. May 2020
    1. Once running, kaniko will then get the data from STDIN and create the build context as a compressed tar. It will then unpack the compressed tar of the build context before starting the image build.
    1. Pipes are great for taking output of one command and transforming it using other commands like jq. They’re a key part of the Unix philosophy of “small sharp tools”: since commands can be chained together with pipes, each command only needs to do one thing and then hand it off to another command.
  12. Feb 2020
  13. Jan 2020
  14. Jun 2019
  15. Apr 2019
  16. Jan 2019
    1. after the terminal operation of the stream pipeline commences.

      Above is because of the nature of Streams in general: they are lazily executed (or put another way, execution is delayed until the latest convenient method call).

  17. Oct 2018
    1. The ReadableStream interface of the Streams API represents a readable stream of byte data. The Fetch API offers a concrete instance of a ReadableStream through the body property of a Response object.
  18. Sep 2018
  19. Jul 2018
    1. Research in HCI has illustrated how this notion of immedi-acy is upheld through the social conventions associated with technologies, as well as through their design. For ex-ample, Harper et al. [16] have described the lived experi-ence (or durée, following Bergson [6]) of Facebook as be-ing located firmly in the now, and have noted that this ne-cessitates a particular approach to the performance of iden-tity on the site by its users. They observe that interactions privilege the present and underpin an impression of events unfolding as they happen (even if this is not the case in terms of spatial time, or Bergson’s temps). Because of this, the performance of identity is one of the moment: users reported feeling it inappropriate to post old content, and were similarly aggrieved when others uploaded photos that surfaced ‘out of time’.

      Look up Harper paper.

      Friction point of out-of-order, non-chronological streams of events on social media.

    2. Research by narrative theorist Ruth Page [35] (a co-author on the above paper) considers fur-ther how Facebook users learn to interpret social media posts when reading the newsfeed. While the series of snip-pets of ‘breaking news’ posted by a variety of members of one’s social network do not offer a typical narrative, readers nevertheless draw their own story-like experience, using their knowledge of those posting content to build a backsto-ry, whilst imagining what may happen next.

      Look up Page paper.

      Could help to bolster argument about crowdsourcing process friction caused by non-chronological social media.

  20. Nov 2015
    1. most blogs have a feature called “pingbacks,”

      Annotations should have “pingbacks”, too. But the most important thing is how to process those later on. We do get into the Activity Streams behind much Learning Analytics.