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  1. Last 7 days
    1. Re"...what is it like? How does it manifest?"For me, the idea that my zettelkasten becomes an entity outside myself is most often (and most obviously) felt in two situations (tho there are probably others):When I'm importing new ideas and a connection arises that I hadn't thought of previouslyWhen following trains of thought and connections arise that I didn't overtly intend to makeIn the first instance, I come across ideas I had forgotten about, and although it's not the direction I assumed the new idea would go, it becomes an exciting and possibly more lucrative way to take it.In the second instance, where I might be tracing a thought line to develop an article, I might, for example, zoom in on the graph view in Obsidian and see an idea that, while not formally connected to the ones I'm following, happens to be in close proximity spatially, and so it triggers a new direction I might want to take the article. (You can see this happen IRL in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9OUn2-h6oVc&)In both cases, my zk feels like it's offering me more than what I would have gotten had I not been communicating with it. There is a sense that I and it are working together. I import new ideas with a rough sense of how they should connect. It shows alternatives to my thinking on the matter.Obviously, in both cases, all the ideas are my own. So, the zk is not necessarily developing ideas for me. But, because of the way in which the ideas are handled—non-hierarchically, rhizomatic, cross-categorical, cross-theme, etc.—non-habituated connections come to light, connections that are less conditioned by my own conventional ways of thinking.

      A good description from Bob Doto.

    1. developed the technology for sequencing ancient DNA degraded and contaminated with modern DNA. They have succeeded in sequencing accurately the genomes of our Neanderthal cousins who lived in Europe about fifty thousand years ago. They also sequenced genomes of our own species who lived in Europe around the same time, and genomes of a third species, called Denisovans because they were found in Denisova cave in Siberia. He published the story of the sequencing and the surprising results in his book, Neanderthal Man: In Search of Lost Genomes, in 2014.

      !- Svante Paabo : Neanderthal Man : In Search of Lost Genomes

    2. In the Pirandello play, "Six Characters in Search of an Author", the six characters come on stage, one after another, each of them pushing the story in a different unexpected direction. I use Pirandello's title as a metaphor for the pioneers in our understanding of the concept of evolution over the last two centuries. Here are my six characters with their six themes. 1. Charles Darwin (1809-1882): The Diversity Paradox. 2. Motoo Kimura (1924-1994): Smaller Populations Evolve Faster. 3. Ursula Goodenough (1943- ): Nature Plays a High-Risk Game. 4. Herbert Wells (1866-1946): Varieties of Human Experience. 5. Richard Dawkins (1941- ): Genes and Memes. 6. Svante Pääbo (1955- ): Cousins in the Cave. The story that they are telling is of a grand transition that occurred about fifty thousand years ago, when the driving force of evolution changed from biology to culture, and the direction changed from diversification to unification of species. The understanding of this story can perhaps help us to deal more wisely with our responsibilities as stewards of our planet.

      !- Pirandello’s play Six Characters in Search of an Author : vehicle for exploring cultural evolution over the last 50,000 years

    3. Biological and Cultural Evolution Six Characters in Search of an Author

      !- Title : Biological and Cultural Evolution Six Characters in Search of an Author !- Author : Freeman Dyson !- Date : 2019

    1. what do I say to these young activists that I train around the world when they come to me and they say are you okay with putting the the CEO of 00:42:38 one of the largest oil companies in the world in as the president of the cop is that really okay well it's not whether he's a nice guy or not or whether he's intelligent 00:42:51 the appearance of a conflict of interest undermines confidence at a time when climate activists around the world and I'm partly speaking for them right here on this stage have come to the conclusion that the people in Authority 00:43:04 are not doing their job there's a lot of blah blah blah as Greta says there are a lot of words and there are some meaningful commitments but we are still failing badly we need to have a super 00:43:17 majority process instead of unanimity in the cop we cannot let the oil companies and gas companies and petrol States tell us what is permissible in the last cop we were not allowed to even discuss 00:43:30 scaling down oil and gas can't discuss it a lot of the ndcs weren't even called for are we going to be able to discuss face scaling down oil and gas in the next cop

      !- COP28 President : is head of UAE ‘s largest oil company - putting the Fox in charge of the hen house

    1. Best B school in Kerala

      Nowadays Kerala is a promising ideal destination for MBA aspirants because the state is a location of many prestigious business schools with excellent MBA programs. Kerala is regarded as the state with the highest rate of literacy in India and as the centre of the nation's education system. Kerala's rapidly expanding economy, which accounts for roughly 4% of all economic activity in India, makes the state an ideal place to pursue an MBA. Marian Institute of Management is the top-ranked MBA school in Kerala with excellent placement rates.

      The MBA programs offered by MIM - The MBA colleges in Kerala with the greatest placement combine top-notch instruction with recruitment to prestigious businesses. Kerala is the top choice for postgraduate study among students all around India. The two-year MBA program develops professionals with entrepreneurial solid skills out of the applicants.

      MBA programs give students a thorough understanding of and training in business operations and business administration management. MBA programs are open to students from all backgrounds, including the humanities, sciences, and business. When a student is looking for jobs at reputable organizations, interpersonal qualities like leadership, problem-solving, analytical ability, goal-oriented, and strong communication may be an advantage. The best placements are at MIM, Kerala's leading MBA school.

      MIM is a part of Marian College, a reputable institution that attracts MBA candidates with its excellent climate and location in the most picturesque hilly region of the Idukki District. This location is blessed with access to global infrastructure, reasonable fees, and a high hiring rate by prestigious firms. Students choose to study at MIM from all across India and other countries as well.

      MIM has been approved by the All-India Council for Technical Education (AICTE), New Delhi, to admit 180 students. The college is approved by the Kerala government and affiliated with Mahatma Gandhi University in Kottayam. The National Board of Accreditation has granted college accreditation (NBA). Since its founding in 2009, the college has had great success placing its graduates in prestigious organizations that offer competitive salaries.

      Best B schools in Kerala, MBA admission

      For more details

      https://miim.ac.in/

    1. Since Rails creates callbacks for dependent associations, always call before_destroy callbacks that perform validation with prepend: true.
    1. 个人学习可能取决于他人行为的主张突出了将学习环境视为一个涉及多个互动参与者的系统的重要性
    1. Just as the wealthiest 1 percent of Americans gobble up a disproportionate share of the nation’s economic resources and rejigger our institutions to funnel them benefits and power, so too do our educational 1 percent suck up a disproportionate share of academic

      opportunities, and threaten to reconfigure academic culture so that it both mimics and serves their values

  2. Jan 2023
    1. Note 9/8j says - "There is a note in the Zettelkasten that contains the argument that refutes the claims on every other note. But this note disappears as soon as one opens the Zettelkasten. I.e. it appropriates a different number, changes position (or: disguises itself) and is then not to be found. A joker." Is he talking about some hypothetical note? What did he mean by disappearing? Can someone please shed some light on what he really meant?

      On the Jokerzettel

      9/8j Im Zettelkasten ist ein Zettel, der das Argument enthält, das die Behauptungen auf allen anderen Zetteln widerlegt.

      Aber dieser Zettel verschwindet, sobald man den Zettelkasten aufzieht.

      D.h. er nimmt eine andere Nummer an, verstellt sich und ist dann nicht zu finden.

      Ein Joker.

      —Niklas Luhmann, ZK II: Zettel 9/8j

      Translation:

      9/8j In the slip box is a slip containing the argument that refutes the claims on all the other slips. But this slip disappears as soon as you open the slip box. That is, he assumes a different number, disguises himself and then cannot be found. A joker.

      Many have asked about the meaning of this jokerzettel over the past several years. Here's my slightly extended interpretation, based on my own practice with thousands of cards, about what Luhmann meant:

      Imagine you've spent your life making and collecting notes and ideas and placing them lovingly on index cards. You've made tens of thousands and they're a major part of your daily workflow and support your life's work. They define you and how you think. You agree with Friedrich Nietzsche's concession to Heinrich Köselitz that “You are right — our writing tools take part in the forming of our thoughts.” Your time is alive with McLuhan's idea that "The medium is the message." or in which his friend John Culkin said, "We shape our tools and thereafter they shape us."

      Eventually you're going to worry about accidentally throwing your cards away, people stealing or copying them, fires (oh! the fires), floods, or other natural disasters. You don't have the ability to do digital back ups yet. You ask yourself, can I truly trust my spouse not to destroy them?,What about accidents like dropping them all over the floor and needing to reorganize them or worse, the ghost in the machine should rear its head?

      You'll fear the worst, but the worst only grows logarithmically in proportion to your collection.

      Eventually you pass on opportunities elsewhere because you're worried about moving your ever-growing collection. What if the war should obliterate your work? Maybe you should take them into the war with you, because you can't bear to be apart?

      If you grow up at a time when Schrodinger's cat is in the zeitgeist, you're definitely going to have nightmares that what's written on your cards could horrifyingly change every time you look at them. Worse, knowing about the Heisenberg Uncertainly Principle, you're deathly afraid that there might be cards, like electrons, which are always changing position in ways you'll never be able to know or predict.

      As a systems theorist, you view your own note taking system as a input/output machine. Then you see Claude Shannon's "useless machine" (based on an idea of Marvin Minsky) whose only function is to switch itself off. You become horrified with the idea that the knowledge machine you've painstakingly built and have documented the ways it acts as an independent thought partner may somehow become self-aware and shut itself off!?!

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gNa9v8Z7Rac

      And worst of all, on top of all this, all your hard work, effort, and untold hours of sweat creating thousands of cards will be wiped away by a potential unknowable single bit of information on a lone, malicious card and your only recourse is suicide, the unfortunate victim of dataism.

      Of course, if you somehow manage to overcome the hurdle of suicidal thoughts, and your collection keeps growing without bound, then you're sure to die in a torrential whirlwind avalanche of information and cards, literally done in by information overload.

      But, not wishing to admit any of this, much less all of this, you imagine a simple trickster, a joker, something silly. You write it down on yet another card and you file it away into the box, linked only to the card in front of it, the end of a short line of cards with nothing following it, because what could follow it? Put it out of your mind and hope your fears disappear away with it, lost in your box like the jokerzettel you imagined. You do this with a self-assured confidence that this way of making sense of the world works well for you, and you settle back into the methodical work of reading and writing, intent on making your next thousands of cards.

    1. Around 1956: "My next task was to prepare my course. Since none of the textbooks known to me was satisfactory, I resorted to the maieutic method that Plato had attributed to Socrates. My lectures consisted essentially in questions that I distributed beforehand to the students, and an abstract of the research that they had prompted. I wrote each question on a 6 × 8 card. I had adopted this procedure a few years earlier for my own work, so I did not start from scratch. Eventually I filled several hundreds of such cards, classed them by subject, and placed them in boxes. When a box filled up, it was time to write an article or a book chapter. The boxes complemented my hanging-files cabinet, containing sketches of papers, some of them aborted, as well as some letters." (p. 129)

      This sounds somewhat similar to Mark Robertson's method of "live Roaming" (using Roam Research during his history classes) as a teaching tool on top of other prior methods.

      link to: Roland Barthes' card collection for teaching: https://hypothes.is/a/wELPGLhaEeywRnsyCfVmXQ

    1. Since 2015 a digitalized card index of Greek functionwords in Coptic is available online (as part of the DDGCL)

      A digitized version of Gertrud Bauer's zettelkasten has been available online since 2015.

    1. Richter, Tonio Sebastian. “Whatever in the Coptic Language Is Not Greek, Can Wholly Be Considered Ancient Egyptian”: Recent Approaches towards an Integrated View of the Egyptian-Coptic Lexicon.” Journal of the Canadian Society for Coptic Studies. Journal de La Société Canadienne Pour Les Études Coptes 9 (2017): 9–32. https://doi.org/10.11588/propylaeumdok.00004673.

      Skimmed for the specifics I was looking for with respect to Gertrud Bauer's zettelkasten.

    2. Tami Gottschalk,

      As a complete aside I can't help but wonder if Tami Gottschalk is related to Louis R. Gottschalk, the historian who wrote Understanding history; a primer of historical method?

    1. to heaven. I see that if my facts were sufficiently vital and significant,—perhaps transmuted more into the substance of the human mind,—Ishould need but one book of poetry to contain them all.

      I have a commonplace-book for facts and another for poetry, but I find it difficult always to preserve the vague distinction which I had in my mind, for the most interesting and beautiful facts are so much the more poetry and that is their success. They are translated from earth

      —Henry David Thoreau February 18, 1852

      Rather than have two commonplaces, one for facts and one for poetry, if one can more carefully and successfully translate one's words and thoughts, they they might all be kept in the commonplace book of poetry.

    2. Like any journal, Thoreau’s is repetitive, which suggests naturalplaces to shorten the text but these are precisely what need to be keptin order to preserve the feel of a journal, Thoreau’s in particular. Itrimmed many of Thoreau’s repetitions but kept them wheneverpossible, because they are important to Thoreau and because theyare beautiful. Sometimes he repeats himself because he is drafting,revising, constructing sentences solid enough to outlast the centuries.

      Henry David Thoreau repeated himself frequently in his journals. Damion Searls who edited an edition of his journals suggested that some of this repetition was for the beauty and pleasure of the act, but that in many examples his repetition was an act of drafting, revising, and constructing.


      Scott Scheper has recommended finding the place in one's zettelkasten where one wants to install a card before writing it out. I believe (check this) that he does this in part to prevent one from repeating themselves, but one could use the opportunity and the new context that brings them to an idea again to rewrite or rework and expand on their ideas while they're so inspired.


      Thoreau's repetition may have also served the idea of spaced repetition: reminding him of his thoughts as he also revised them. We'll need examples of this through his writing to support such a claim. As the editor of this volume indicates that he removed some of the repetition, it may be better to go back to original sources than to look for these examples here.

      (This last paragraph on repetition was inspired by attempting to type a tag for repetition and seeing "spaced repetition" pop up. This is an example in my own writing practice where the serendipity of a previously tagged word auto-populating/auto-completing in my interface helps to trigger new thoughts and ideas from a combinatorial creativity perspective.)

    1. After browsing through a variety of the cards in Gertrud Bauer's Zettelkasten Online it becomes obvious that the collection was created specifically as a paper-based database for search, retrieval, and research. The examples and data within it are much more narrowly circumscribed for a specific use than those of other researchers like Niklas Luhmann whose collection spanned a much broader variety of topics and areas of knowledge.

      This particular use case makes the database nature of zettelkasten more apparent than some others, particularly in modern (post-2013 zettelkasten of a more personal nature).

      I'm reminded here of the use case(s) described by Beatrice Webb in My Apprenticeship for scientific note taking, by which she more broadly meant database creation and use.

    1. In summer 2010, Professor Peter Nagel of Bonn forwarded seven cardboard boxes full of lexicographical slips to the DDGLC office, which had been handed over to him in the early '90s by the late Professor Alexander Böhlig.

      In the 1990s Professor Alexander Böhlig of the University of Tuebingen gave Gertrud Bauer's zettelkasten to Professor Peter Nagel of Bonn. He in turn forwardd the seven cardboard boxes of slips to the Database and Dictionary of Greek Loanwords in Coptic (DDGLC) office for their use.

    2. The original slips have been scanned and slotted into a database replicating the hierarchical structure of the original compilation. It is our pleasure to provide a new lexicographical tool to our colleagues in Coptology, Classical Studies, and Linguistics, and other interested parties.

      The Database and Dictionary of Greek Loanwords in Coptic (DDGLC) has scanned and placed the original slips from Gertrud Bauer's zettelkasten into a database for scholarly use. The database allows the replication of the hierarchical structure of Bauer's original compilation.

    1. Index card carrying case

      Try Kaitiaki or Rite in the Rain. If you search for "index card wallet" you'll likely find a variety of others, including some custom made versions on sites like Etsy. 3 x 5" are relatively common, but 4 x 6" are much harder to come by.

    1. ExxonMobil, the world’s biggest oil company, knew as early as 1981 of climate change – seven years before it became a public issue, according to a newly discovered email from one of the firm’s own scientists. Despite this the firm spent millions over the next 27 years to promote climate denial.

      Exxon knew as early as 1981 of climate change

    1. The oil giant Exxon privately “predicted global warming correctly and skilfully” only to then spend decades publicly rubbishing such science in order to protect its core business, new research has found.

      Exxon Knew

    1. The Massachusetts high court on Tuesday ruled that the US’s largest oil company, ExxonMobil, must face a trial over accusations that it lied about the climate crisis and covered up the fossil fuel industry’s role in worsening environmental devastation.

      Exxon must face trial for climate crimes, Exxon Knew

    1. not the technology itself that will bring about the learning or solve pedagogic prob-lems in the language classroom, but rather the affordances of those technologies andtheir use and integration in a well-formulated curriculum
    2. eachers’ digital litera-cies and their preparedness and motivation to introduce technology in their teachingwill largely impact on the extent to which technology-mediated TBLT will be viable asan innovation (Hubbard 2008)
    3. The addition of new technologies to people’s lives is never neutral, as it affects them,their language, and their personal knowledge and relations (Crystal 2008; Jenkinset al. 2009; Walther 2012)
    4. “digital natives”(Prensky 2001)

      A retenir pour usage ultérieur: digital native aka gen Z

    5. Warschauer has long warned, computerand information technology is no magic bullet and can be used to widen as much asto narrow social and educational gaps (Warschauer 2012
    6. particularly newInternet-connected devices and digital technologies have become embedded in thelife and learning processes of many new generations of students (Baron 2004; Ito et al.2009)

      saving this fact because it can be used as a reference in all our works later: so related to our field.

    1. The fate of Luetzerath embodies Germany's battle to ditch coal to meet its climate commitments and also keep the lights on following Russia's squeeze on gas supplies.

      Sky news on Luetzerath with strong picture

    1. Die Braunkohle unter dem Dorf Lützerath (Kreis Heinsberg) wird nicht benötigt, um die Energieversorgung in Deutschland sicherzustellen.

      Lützerath kohle nicht gebraucht

    1. Am 1. Dezember wurde im Bundestag der Deal des vorgezogenen Kohleausstiegs zwischen Robert Habeck, NRW-Ministerin Mona Neubaur und RWE-Chef Krebber angenommen(1).

      luetzerathlebt.info - aktuelle situation

    1. Another problem arises from the very nature of documentary material astexts not written for posterity. When reading Geniza letters, one is often in theposition of an uninvited guest at a social event, that is, someone who is unfa-miliar with the private codes and customs shared by the inner circle. Writersoften do not bother to explain themselves in a complete manner when they

      know that the recipient is already familiar with the subject. 17

      17 Indeed, writers often used this shared understanding to stress the relationship they had with the recipients.

    2. Most editions of Geniza documents appear in Hebrew-language publications, andthis means that Hebrew documents are usually left untranslated. It is important to recognizethat this is a problem.
    1. i don't feel like we have any major  uh disagreement about you know everything you just   said michael uh let me say also regarding you know  my book capital in the 21st century you know it's   a book that has lots of limitations and and you  know i have on many issues you know i've tried to   00:26:31 to to to make progress since then so this  was written 10 years ago i wrote capital   and ideology much more recently which i  think addresses some of the shortcomings   but this is and still this book has also a  lot of limitations so you know i'm trying to   make progress all the time and i certainly  don't pretend that all the answers are in   you know one book and that being said i think you  know many many things that you've mentioned you   know again i fully agree with

      !- Thomas Piketty : Agreement with Michael and limitations of past books - Piketty states that every book has a lot of limitations. Capital and Ideology is his recent book and addresses some of the shortcomings of Capital in the 21st Century

    2. it's what i write about and that is why what  is it that has created this uh uh disparity   and why is it widened so much since 1980. well  the most obvious reason is uh interest rates   reached a peak of 20 in uh 1980 and they've gone  down ever since well in the late 1970s uh my old   00:16:50 boss's boss at chase manhattan paul volcker  said let's raise interest rates to very high   because the 99 are getting too much income their  wages are going up let's uh raise interest to slow   the economy and that will prevent wages from going  up and he did and that was a large uh reason why   carter lost the the election to ronald reagan  interest rates then went down from 20 to almost 0   00:17:20 today the result was the largest bond market boom  in history bonds went way up in price the economy   was flooded with bank credit and most of this  credit uh apart from going into the bond market   went into real estate and there is a uh symbiosis  between finance and real estate and also between   finance and raw materials and also like oil and  gas and minerals uh extraction natural resource   00:17:48 rent land rent and also monopoly rent and most of  the monopoly rent has come from the privatization   that you had from ronald reagan margaret thatcher  and the whole neoliberalism uh if you look at how   did this one percent get most of its wealth well  if you look at the forbes list of the billionaires   in almost every country they got wealth in  the old-fashioned way from taking it from   00:18:13 the public domain in other words privatization  you have the largest privatization and transfer   of wealth from the public sector to uh the private  sector and specifically to the financial sector uh   in in history uh sell-offs and all of a sudden  instead of uh infrastructure uh public health uh   other uh basic needs being provided at subsidized  rates to the population you have uh privatized   00:18:41 owners uh financed by the banks raising the rates  to whatever rate they can get without any market   firing power uh in the united states the  government is not even allowed to bargain with   the pharmaceutical companies for the drug prices  so there's been a huge monopolization a huge   privatization a huge flooding of the economy with  credit and one person's credit is somebody else's   00:19:11 uh debt so you you've described the one percent's  wealth in the form of uh savings but uh i focus   on the other side of the balance sheet this one  percent finds its counterpart in the debts of the   99 so the one percent has got wealthy by indebting  the 99 uh for housing that is soared in price 20   00:19:37 uh just in the last year in the united states uh  for medical care for uh utilities for education   uh the economy is being forced increasingly  into debt and how how can one uh solve this   taxation will not be enough the only way  that you can uh actually reverse this uh   concentration of wealth is to begin wiping out uh  the debt if you leave the debt in place of the 99   00:20:10 uh then uh you're going to leave the one percent  savings all in place uh and these savings are   largely tax exempt uh so basically i think you  you uh left out the government's role in this   wealth creation of the one percent so your  finance has indeed grown faster than economy   absorbed real estate into the finance insurance  and real estate sector the fire sector finances   00:20:39 absorb the oil industry the mining industry  and it's absorbed most of the government so the   financial wealth has spilled over to become  essentially the economy's central planner   it's not planned in washington or paris or london  it's planned in wall street the city of london   and the paris ports the economy is being managed  financially and the object of financial management   00:21:04 isn't really to make money it's capital gains  and again as your statistics point out capital   gains are really what explains the increase  in wealth you don't get rich by saving the   income rent is for paying interest income is for  paying interest you get rich off the government   basically subsidizing an enormous increase in the  value of stocks the value of bonds by the central   00:21:31 banks which have been privatized and uh the reason  that this is occurring is that uh the largest   public utility of all money creation and banking  is left in private hands and private banking   in the west is very different from what government  banking is in say china

      !- Michael Hudson : Wealth is created in the 1% through privatization and loss of the 99% - Largest transfer of wealth in history from the public sector to the private sector, especially through financial sector - govt fire sale of public infrastructure - credit was created and invested in the biggest bon market boom in history - many of Forbes billionaires got rich through such privatization - the 1% got wealthy by indebting the 99% through privatization all around the globe - this was the effect of Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher's neoliberal policies - taxation alone is not sufficient to reverse this wealth concentration, the debt has to be completely wiped out

      !- key statement : the elite get rich off the government subsidizing an enormous increase in the value of stocks the value of bonds by the central bank which have been privatized. The reason THAT is happening is because the largest public utility of all, money creation and central banking has been privatized.

    1. Wir sind die Initiative „Lützerath Lebt“ und mittlerweile seit circa zwei Jahren in Lützerath aktiv. Unser Protest vor Ort entstand als RWE im Juni 2020 die Landstraße (L277) zwischen Lützerath und Keyenberg abgerissen hat.

      Was ist Lützerath lebt?

    1. We know the information. But information is not changing our minds. Most people make decisions on the basis of feelings, including the most important decisions in life – what football team you support, who you marry, which house you live in. That is how we make choices.”  “Thought is at the basis of our feelings, and before we have ideas we have feelings that lead to those ideas. So how do we change minds? A change in feelings changes minds.”

      !- "So how do we change minds? A change in feeling changes minds" : Comment - Brian Eno's comment is very well aligned with Deep Humanity praxis, which can be summed up as: The heart feels, the mind thinks, the body acts, an impact appears in our shared reality. - Also see the related story: - Storytelling will save the Earth: https://hyp.is/go?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wired.com%2Fstory%2Fenvironment-climate-change-storytelling%2F&group=world

    2. he power of the creative industries to inspire movements was largely absent from high-level discussions on climate change, such as at COP (Conference of the Parties), or in communicating scientific findings, such as from the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change).

      !- Creative industries : absence in high level talks like COPs or climate communication

    1. I've worked with and have helped maintain paranoia for a while. I'm convinced it does the wrong thing for most cases. Paranoia and acts_as_paranoid both attempt to emulate deletes by setting a column and adding a default scope on the model. This requires some ActiveRecord hackery, and leads to some surprising and awkward behaviour.
    1. Much of what they do can be done without eliciting the ire of nation-states. Bike shares, pedestrian zones, insulated buildings, renovated port facilities, congestion fees, car emission limits, furnace specifications, fuel upgrades (from oil to gas to alternative energy) and white paint roofs, for example, are only some of the innovations city officials can promote to effect significant reductions in emissions and pollutants.

      !- cities actions : can be done without eliciting ire of nation state - bike shares - pedestrian zones - insulated buildings - renovated ports - congestion fees - car emission limits - furnace specifications - fuel upgrades - white paint roofs - cities are the right level for focusing on effective global climate action

    2. here states have grown dysfunctional and sovereignty has become an obstacle to global democratic action—as when the United States (or China, France, or Canada) refuses to compromise its sovereignty by permitting the international monitoring of carbon emissions on its soil—cities have increasingly proven themselves capable of deliberative democratic action on behalf of sustainability, as they have actually done in intercity associations like the C-40 or ICLEI. If presidents and prime ministers cannot summon the will to work for a sustainable planet, mayors can. If citizens of the province and nation think ideologically and divisively, neighbors and citizens of the towns and cities think publicly and cooperatively.

      !- claim : cities can mitigate corrupted democracy and foster global cooperation - ie. C40 or ICLEI (also Covenant of Mayors) - cities are not plagued by the problems of state actors who cannot reach any meaningful agreement at COP conferences

  3. Dec 2022
    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPuqBdPULx4

      Mostly this is a lot of yammering about what is to come and the trials and tribulations it's taken him to get set up for making the video tutorials. Just skip to the later videos in the series.

      He did mention that he would be giving a sort of "peep show" of his note taking method, though he didn't indicate whether or not we might be satisfied with it. This calls to mind Luhmann's quote about showing his own zettelkasten being like a pornfilm, but somehow people were left disappointed.

      cross reference: https://hyp.is/GFj15IcbEe21OIMwT2TOJA/niklas-luhmann-archiv.de/bestand/zettelkasten/zettel/ZK_2_NB_9-8-3_V

    1. 9/8,3 Geist im Kasten? Zuschauer kommen. Sie bekommen alles zusehen, und nichts als das – wie beimPornofilm. Und entsprechend ist dieEnttäuschung.

      https://niklas-luhmann-archiv.de/bestand/zettelkasten/zettel/ZK_2_NB_9-8-3_V

      I've read and referenced this several times, but never bothered to log it into my notes.

      Sasha Fast's translation:

      Ghost in the box? Spectators visit. They get to see everything, and nothing but that - like in a porn movie. And the disappointment is correspondingly high.

    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'> Chuck Grimmett</span> in 40 Questions for 2022 (<time class='dt-published'>12/27/2022 20:27:38</time>)</cite></small>

    1. My goal was simply to scale this ladder over time. I worked the list 5 people at a time, starting at the bottom. I engaged relentlessly with those accounts until they noticed me and began engaging back.

      Interesting approach and these people are going to be great candidates for picking up new knowledge and self learning from too!

    2. Don’t try to convince everyone that what you say, feel, think, or have done is better than everyone else.

      This is pretty normal for those of us who are academically inclined so it shouldn't be too much of a stretch - after all a lot of the time what we're doing is thinking about other peoples' works critically

    1. In this case, if the constant Admin::User was already loaded at the time Admin::UserManager.all was called, then it would return Admin::User objects.However, if Admin::User was not yet auto-loaded, but User was, Admin::UserManager.all would instead return User objects!
    1. Seeking full energy independence from Russian gas, in response to Russia's energy blackmail in #Europe and the war in #Ukraine 🇺🇦, #Lithuania 🇱🇹 has completely abandoned Russian gas

      Lithuania abandons Russian Gas

    1. “I have a trick that I used in my studio, because I have these twenty-eight-hundred-odd pieces of unreleased music, and I have them all stored in iTunes,” Eno said during his talk at Red Bull. “When I’m cleaning up the studio, which I do quite often—and it’s quite a big studio—I just have it playing on random shuffle. And so, suddenly, I hear something and often I can’t even remember doing it. Or I have a very vague memory of it, because a lot of these pieces, they’re just something I started at half past eight one evening and then finished at quarter past ten, gave some kind of funny name to that doesn’t describe anything, and then completely forgot about, and then, years later, on the random shuffle, this thing comes up, and I think, Wow, I didn’t hear it when I was doing it. And I think that often happens—we don’t actually hear what we’re doing. . . . I often find pieces and I think, This is genius. Which me did that? Who was the me that did that?”

      Example of Brian Eno using ITunes as a digital music zettelkasten. He's got 2,800 pieces of unreleased music which he plays on random shuffle for serendipity, memory, and potential creativity. The experience seems to be a musical one which parallels Luhmann's ideas of serendipity and discovery with the ghost in the machine or the conversation partner he describes in his zettelkasten practice.

    1. Alexis de Tocqueville referred to this in his 1840 treatise on America as self-interest properly understood. In fact, the full title of the chapter from his book,Democracy in America, is, “How the Americans Combat Individualism by theDoctrine of Self-Interest Properly Understood.” His basic premise was that“one sees that by serving his fellows, man serves himself and that doing good isto his private advantage.”6
    1. No es magia.

      I love that he points this out explicitly.

      Some don't see the underlying processes of complexity within note taking methods and as a result ascribe magical properties to what are emergent properties or combinatorial creativity.

      See also: The Ghost in the Machine zettel from Luhmann

      Somehow there's an odd dichotomy between the boredom of such a simple method and people seeing magic within it at the same time. This is very similar to those who feel that life must be divinely created despite the evidence brought by evolutionary and complexity theory. In this arena, there is a lot more evolved complexity which makes the system harder to see compared to the simpler zettelkasten process.

    1. The Equinor-operated Rosebank oil and gas field will provide significant investment into the UK.

      justification with investment in terms of money

    1. Field participation detailsThe field is owned by Equinor, Suncor Energy and Siccar Point Energy.

      rosebank (crude) oil and gas field participation information and estimated production

    1. Easy to scan and understand what’s discussed in the space. Fewer distractions to help you focus on topics you care about. Easy to browse topics because they’re all in one place in the thread navigation panel. Thread replies don’t interrupt the main conversation. You can toggle history on and off.
    2. You can find some benefits and limitations of each kind of space organization below.
    1. Whether you want to call them mottos, memes, or manifestos, words can be the building blocks of how we think and transmit ideas. You can also gauge how well someone is grasping your concepts—or at least making an effort to—by the language they’re responding to you with as well.

      You can use the way that a person responds to your concepts as a metric for how well they understand you. If they don't understand chances are they will retreat back to jargon to try to hide the fact that they're struggling. If they're getting on well they might have an insightful way to extend your metaphor

  4. Nov 2022
    1. Donations

      To add some other intermediary services:

      To add a service for groups:

      To add a service that enables fans to support the creators directly and anonymously via microdonations or small donations by pre-charging their Coil account to spend on content streaming or tipping the creators' wallets via a layer containing JS script following the Interledger Protocol proposed to W3C:

      If you want to know more, head to Web Monetization or Community or Explainer

      Disclaimer: I am a recipient of a grant from the Interledger Foundation, so there would be a Conflict of Interest if I edited directly. Plus, sharing on Hypothesis allows other users to chime in.

    1. A blog post is a very long and complex search query to find fascinating people and make them route interesting stuff to your inbox.

      This is a really cool take on blogging. By writing about interesting people and stuff you are increasing your chances of meeting someone cool and indeed increasing your luck

    1. https://brainsteam.co.uk/2022/11/26/one-week-with-hypothesis/

      I too read a lot of niche papers and feel the emptiness, but because I'm most often writing for myself anyway, its alright. There are times, however, when I see a growing community of people who've left their associative trails behind before I've found a particular page.

      I've used the phrase "digital exhaust" before, but I like the more positive framing of "learning exhaust".

      If you've not found it yet, my own experimentations with the platform can largely be found here: https://boffosocko.com/tag/hypothes.is/

    1. Annotations are the first step of getting useful insights into my notes. This makes it a prerequisite to be able to capture annotations in my note making tool Obsidian, otherwise Hypothes.is is just another silo you’re wasting time on. Luckily h. isn’t meant as a silo and has an API. Using the API and the Hypothes.is-to-Obsidian plugin all my annotations are available to me locally.

      This is key - exporting annotations via the API to either public commonplace books (Chris A Style) or to a private knowledge store seems to be pretty common.

    2. In the same category of integrating h. into my pkm workflows, falls the interaction between h. and Zotero, especially now that Zotero has its own storage of annotations of PDFs in my library. It might be of interest to be able to share those annotations, for a more complete overview of what I’m annotating. Either directly from Zotero, or by way of my notes in Obsidian (Zotero annotatins end up there in the end)

      I've been thinking about this exact same flow. Given that I'm mostly annotating scientific papers I got from open access journals I was wondering whether there might be some way to syndicate my zotero annotations back to h via a script.

    1. Whatever your thing is, make the thing you wish you had found when you were learning. Don’t judge your results by “claps” or retweets or stars or upvotes - just talk to yourself from 3 months ago

      Completely agree, this is a great intrinsic metric to measure the success of your work by.

    2. a habit of creating learning exhaust:

      not sure I love the metaphor but I can definitely see the advantages of leaving your learnings "out there" for others to see and benefit from

    1. How Much Does it Cost to Hire App Developers in 2023?

      One of the most significant factors in determining the cost of hiring an app developer is the expected output. So want to know the cost of Hire App Cost Developers? In this, Blog we have explained the how much does it Cost to Hire an App Developers.https://bit.ly/3AKLsfP

  5. 6291320.fs1.hubspotusercontent-na1.net 6291320.fs1.hubspotusercontent-na1.net
    1. We find favorwith Mortimer J. Adler’s stance, from 1940,that “marking up a book is not an act ofmutilation but of love.”18

      also:

      Full ownership of a book only comes when you have made it a part of yourself, and the best way to make yourself a part of it—which comes to the same thing—is by writing in it. —Adler, Mortimer J., and Charles Van Doren. How to Read a Book. Revised and Updated edition. 1940. Reprint, New York: Simon & Schuster, 1972.

      They also suggest that due to the relative low cost of books, it's easier to justify writing in them, though they carve out an exception for the barbarism of scribbling in library books.

    1. Top 10 Indian Grocery Delivery Mobile Apps in 2023

      Food is a basic need of human beings. The grocery Delivery app is one of those on-demand trending apps which is often used to order groceries online. The Top Grocery Delivery App saves your time by bringing your groceries to your home only. Check out this blog will help you choose if you are searching for the Best Grocery Delivery apps in India.

    1. Top 5 Food Delivery Apps In USA

      Are you looking for the Top 5 Food Delivery App in USA? If yes then Here is the, list of top food delivery applications that includes the most demanding applications. Read the brief description of all top 5 Food Delivery App from the blog. https://bit.ly/2JO4CZi

    1. Cloud Computing in Healthcare: How Technology is Improving the Industry The healthcare industry is one of the most important sectors in any economy, and it relies heavily on technology. This blog post will explore how cloud computing solutions are definitely worth their weight in gold in the healthcare industry. https://bit.ly/3tpAvMO

    1. Indian students can select from a number of MBA courses in the USA such as Marketing, operations management, general management, supply chain management, resource management, etc.
    1. Novelists Ernest Hemingway and Wil-liam Faulkner, for example, went backand forth about the virtues of simplic-ity in writing. Faulkner once criticizedHemingway, who he said “had nocourage, never been known to use aword that might send the reader to thedictionary.” “Poor Faulkner,” Heming-way responded, “Does he really thinkbig emotions come from big words?He thinks I don’t know the ten-dollarwords. I know them all right. But thereare older and simpler and better words,and those are the ones I use.”15

      15 A.E. Hotchner , PAPA heminGwAy 69-70 (1966) (quoting Hemingway).

    2. Justice Felix Frankfurter,a prolific writer as a Harvard lawprofessor before joining the SupremeCourt, was right that “[a]nything thatis written may present a problem ofmeaning” because words “seldomattain[] more than approximate preci-sion.”12

      12 Felix Frankfurter, Some Reflections On the Reading of Statutes, 47 CoLUm . L. rev. 527, 528 (1947), reprinting Felix Frankfurter, Sixth Annual Benjamin N. Cardozo Lecture, 2 Rec. Bar Ass'n City of N.Y. (No. 6, 1947).

    1. Samuel Bowles and Herbert Gintis intheir classic Schooling in Capitalist America

      Bowles and Gintis apparently make an argument in Schooling in Capitalist America that changes in education in the late 1800s/early 1900s served the ends of capitalists rather than the people.

    1. Why is marking a book indispensable to reading it? First,it keeps you awake-not merely conscious, but wide awake.Second, reading, if it is active, is thinking, and thinking tendsto express itself in words, spoken or written. The person whosays he knows what he thinks but cannot express it usually doesnot know what he thinks. Third, writing your reactions downhelps you to remember the thoughts of the author.
    2. . Full ownership of a bookonly comes when you have made it a part of yourself, and thebest way to make yourself a part of it-which comes to thesame thing-is by writing in it.
    3. The pencil then becomes the sign of your alertness while you read.
    1. When I come across interesting information, I highlight then comment a corresponding question:

      Every studio has a slate.

      What is the source for this?

      It's highly related to having a direction in life, or the famous example of Feynman's 12 Favorite Problems that he always kept in mind to slowly be working at.

      Part of having a list of purpose dovetails to how one builds their identity too.

    2. This reminded me of Robert Greene’s definition of creativity, which is that creativity is a function of putting in lots of tedious work. “If you put a lot of hours into thinking and researching and reading,” Robert says, “hour after hour—a very tedious process—creativity will come to you.” 

      Robert Green's definition of creativity sounds like it's related to diffuse thinking processes. read: https://billyoppenheimer.com/august-14-2022/

      Often note taking, and reviewing over those notes is more explicit in form for creating new ideas.

      Come back to explore these.

    3. The novelist and screenwriter Raymond Chandler said he avoided reading books written by someone who didn’t “take the pains” to write out the words. (It used to be common for writers to dictate into a recorder then have an assistant transcribe those words.) “You have to have that mechanical resistance,” Chandler wrote in a 1949 letter to actor/writer Alex Barris. “When you have to use your energy to put those words down, you are more apt to make them count.”
    1. Synchronously waiting for the specific child processes in a (specific) order may leave zombies present longer than the above-mentioned "short period of time"
    1. the container ship was simply becoming so large so unwieldy that much of the infrastructure around them is struggling to cope a lot of the decisions to build Supply chains were really based on

      Impact of cheap transportation

      production costs and transport costs

      With transportation costs so low and logistics assumed, manufactures chased cheaper production costs. They would outsource manufacturing to low-cost countries without considering the complexity risks.

  6. Oct 2022
    1. @route @twalpole as a community I think we're super grateful for your work on a CDP alternative to chromedriver/selenium, poltergeist etc. I do think collaboration could be very valuable though, although it would likely mean abandoning one of the projects and teaming up on the other, you both obviously have very deep knowledge of CDP and therefore would get a load more done than any of us "end users" trying to wade in there. The status for us on our Rails project is that Apparition fails with a ton of errors, they all seem related to handling timing events (accept_prompt doesn't work, opening new windows seems problematic etc etc etc) whereas Cuprite only rails with a cookie gem we're using (easy fixed) and doesn't support drag_to yet. So to me Cuprite seems more complete, but I don't know much about the internals.
    2. As both projects are written by 2 different people independently there's huge difference in the code. I don't think I have time or wish to merge them because it's huge amount of work. The common thing between them is only CDP that's all. Though Cuprite is already stable and supports all features that Capybara requires, we run tests and do many cools things with it in production.
    3. As a history mark, when back then I asked Thomas if he started to work on CDP, he said yes but never finished it, so I started this project from scratch which by now feels completed. After releasing it I only yesterday realized that he open-sourced his project and keeps working on it. I think it just feels hard to throw everything you have written to trash, but I wasn't proposed at the beginning to work together on common project and this is the reason Cuprite had began. Though since this project is completed I see no sense to work on something else especially for me, the only difference would be in Ruby implementation which is boring as you can do things in a different manner and CDP has issues too so the difference could be only how we workaround them.
    4. And yeah, you two should probably gang up :)
    5. what is the difference? and why do you write it from scratch?
    6. Haven't really looked through your code, so not sure what the difference is - I would guess not too much. I told you about my version when we were discussing the issues you were having on cuprite -- It was 70+ percent done so I released it and finished up most of the rest. I guess one difference is that you appear to be aiming at bleeding edge Chromium, whereas I'm more focused on things working on Chrome release since I think that's more important for people to test with (no customer is going to be running Chromium alpha).
    7. I also was surprised to see 2 "kind of similar" new drivers both targeting CDP I wonder if joining forces ultimately would be a good idea?
    1. The sense of wonder and discovery that made all the cruelty of the Abyss worth enduring is gone, replaced with increasingly over-the-top attempts at shock horror that crescendos with a concept so ludicrous it stops being horrifying and starts being embarrassing.

      This is exactly right. The first 9 episodes of the first season of Made in Abyss represented some of the best anime of the previous decade precisely because they depicted "[t]he sense of wonder and discovery that made all the cruelty of the Abyss worth exploring..." It was a great, and haunting, adventure story. The end of season one stagnated, the movie went over the line that the first season flirted with, and the second season lost all of the qualities (other than high production values) that made season 1 memorable. The exploring was outsourced to the flashbacks of side-characters, and the whole season was stuck in a single location that was not particularly interesting.

    2. I love the first season of MiA, even more now than I did when it first aired. And on paper I should be down for more of this fascinating, macabre world of wonders and horrors. But somewhere in this second season, the graceful balancing act that made it all so compelling fell apart. Maybe it's that our main trio feel like barely relevant observers of a story largely divorced from them, loading all of Reg's character development into a flashback he doesn't even remember and relegating Nanachi to a half-season-long nap just so we can retread their goodbye to Mitty. Maybe it's the fact that the slow-burn mystery of the titular city feels as hollow as its main residents, ramping up its increasingly aimless body horror to the point that it starts to feel like an Aristocrats joke that's gone on way too long.

      I agree fully with this list of flaws about the second season of Made in Abyss. The first season was terrific, but it flirted with excess in terms of violence and general unpleasantness (excess was achieved in the movie). The second season feels stagnant, sidelines the main characters, and the "aimless body horror" is a good way to describe much of the violence and grossness, which reached Elfen Lied levels of absurdity toward the end.

    1. One of W.G. Sebald’s masterpieces, The Rings of Saturn, an indescribable blend of fact and fiction, contains a section about one of his academic colleagues whose office was piled high with notes about Gustav Flaubert.