10 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2019
  2. Feb 2019
    1. it is necessary first to consider their use and end:

      Is language seen as a means to an end?

    2. Locke believes that there b a real external world and that knowledge of it is pos!-iblc. hul only ii' we underst:md the processes by which we come lo ~uch knowledge.

      Knowledge is the goal, the end, but the process by which knowledge is discovered, the means, is also important to Locke.

  3. Jan 2019
    1. n otherwords, even if rhetoric is the art of never finally answering the question, "Whatis rhetoric?" this art would necessarily include all attempts to finally answer thatquestion.

      Based on this statement, could it be inferred that Muckelbauer places importance on not only the answer to the question (end) but also the process by which that answer is sought (means)? If so, how might the process of discovery be as important as the discovery itself?

  4. Jul 2018
  5. Sep 2017
    1. The point of political protest is to change the world. And yet the process matters, too.
    2. To live in the present is not to avoid hard work or strife. Alongside the projects that occupy you in your profession, or in your political life, the telic activities that matter to you, is the atelic process of protesting injustice or doing your job. To value the process is not to flee from work or political engagement. That is why living in the present is not an abdication of ethical responsibility or a recipe for detachment.
    3. To live in the present is not to deny the value of telic activities, of making a difference in the world. That would be a terrible mistake. Nor can we avoid engaging in such activities. But if projects are all we value, our lives become self-subversive, aimed at extinguishing the sources of meaning within them. To live in the present is to refuse the excessive investment in projects, in achievements and results, that sees no inherent value in the process.
    4. “If you are learning, you have not at the same time learned.” When you care about telic activities, projects such as writing a report, getting married or making dinner, satisfaction is always in the future or the past. It is yet to be achieved and then it is gone. Telic activities are exhaustible; in fact, they aim at their own exhaustion. They thus exhibit a peculiar self-subversion. In valuing and so pursuing these activities, we aim to complete them, and so to expel them from our lives.