199 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Beschreibt, wie die Trump-Administration versucht, die internationalen Medien der US-Regierung (wie Voice of America) unter Kontrolle zu bringen und propagandistisch umzufunktionieren. Manches erinnert an Orwells 1984. Es ist auch deutlich, dass hier Steve Bannon eine große Rolle spielt. Eine Schlüsselrolle hat dessen Gefolgsmann Michael Pack.

  2. Aug 2020
  3. Jul 2020
    1. Fact Check: Despite White House claims, PAW Patrol and police LEGO have not been canceled

      So now the White House is lying about children's television shows? Where does it end?

    1. These criminal acts are frequently planned and supported by agitators who have traveled across State lines to promote their own violent agenda.  These radicals shamelessly attack the legitimacy of our institutions and the very rule of law itself.

      Appears to be an implicit reference to the Anti-Riot Act.

  4. Jun 2020
    1. Wow. This is a side of the fandom I wouldn't want to touch with a 20 foot pole. However, it provides interesting information about the darker sides of the furry fandom, so it would be good to pore over.

      I am reminded of "Arkansas":

  5. May 2020
    1. Gradually, we begin to conflate visibility with value. If something is being talked about and seen, we assume that it must be important in some way. – An Illustrated Guide to Guy Debord’s ‘The Society of the Spectacle’

      And in an over-saturated media space, this is exactly the sort of thing that lands us a narcissistic and incompetent president.

  6. Apr 2020
  7. Mar 2020
    1. An NSC official confirmed the existence of the playbook but dismissed its value. “We are aware of the document, although it’s quite dated and has been superseded by strategic and operational biodefense policies published since,” the official said. “The plan we are executing now is a better fit, more detailed, and applies the relevant lessons learned from the playbook and the most recent Ebola epidemic in the [Democratic Republic of the Congo] to COVID-19.”

      If this is the case, then where is this "new" playbook? And can they point to specific pieces on that timeline that indicate that they're actually performing better than the prior playbook? Let's see the evidence here.

  8. Feb 2020
    1. Firms should not be owned and managed by people who survive because of their connections to government or their privileged birth: Capitalism is dynamic when owners or managers succeed because they are good at delivering high-quality goods and services at a competitive price. This is more likely to be a failure when the other two factors above are not working well.

      Here is where we're likely to fail in the United States by following the example of Donald Trump, who ostensibly has survived solely off the wealth of his father's dwindling empire. With that empire gone, he's now turning to creating wealth by associating with the government. We should carefully follow where this potentially leads the country.

  9. Jan 2020
    1. there must be other factors that got us Trump

      Primarily people not really knowing how racisit and horrible he really was in addition to his inability to think clearly, logically, or linearly. He espoused a dozen or so simple aphorisms like "Build the wall," but was absolutely unable to indicate a plan that went beyond the aphorism. How will it be implemented, funded, what will the short and long term issues that result. He had none of those things that many others presumed would be worked out as details by smart and intelligent people rather than the "just do it" managerial style he has been shown to espouse.

      Too many republicans, particularly at the end said, "he's not really that bad" and now that he's in power and more authoritarian than they expected are too weak to admit their mistake.

  10. Dec 2019
  11. Oct 2019
    1. During her confirmation hearing she did not discuss her family’s extensive ties to the Chinese maritime industry, and she did not disclose the various Chinese accolades she had received. The Senate’s written questionnaire requires nominees to list all honorary positions.
    1. In case you wanted to be even more skeptical of Mark Zuckerberg and his cohorts, Facebook has now changed its advertising policies to make it easier for politicians to lie in paid ads. Donald Trump is taking full advantage of this policy change, as popular info reports.
    2. The claim in this ad was ruled false by those Facebook-approved third-party fact-checkers, but it is still up and running. Why? Because Facebook changed its policy on what constitutes misinformation in advertising. Prior to last week, Facebook’s rule against “false and misleading content” didn’t leave room for gray areas: “Ads landing pages, and business practices must not contain deceptive, false, or misleading content, including deceptive claims, offers, or methods.”
  12. Sep 2019
    1. More conspicuously, since Trump’s election, the RNC — at his campaign’s direction — has excluded critical “voter scores” on the president from the analytics it routinely provides to GOP candidates and committees nationwide, with the aim of electing down-ballot Republicans. Republican consultants say the Trump information is being withheld for two reasons: to discourage candidates from distancing themselves from the president, and to avoid embarrassing him with poor results that might leak. But they say its concealment harms other Republicans, forcing them to campaign without it or pay to get the information elsewhere.
    2. Trump’s online and email fundraising generated a record $239 million in small-dollar donations, far more than Hillary Clinton’s and more than two-thirds of his donation total, according to the nonpartisan Campaign Finance Institute. This made Trump competitive in a race where he was outspent nearly 2 to 1.

      Not to mention the free media he was getting from the mainstream media who covered the spectacle.

    3. One previously unreported example: Since Trump’s election in 2016, critical “voter scores” — sophisticated polling-based analytics that the RNC provides to party committees and candidates — have conspicuously omitted an essential detail for any down-ballot race: how voters in specific states and congressional districts feel about Trump. Republican insiders believe these analytics are being withheld to try and prevent GOP candidates from publicly distancing themselves from the president or leaking unfavorable results that embarrass Trump.

      I'm curious if the DNC would provide these numbers to those candidates? Is there potentially other sources for this data?

  13. Aug 2019
    1. and annotation can tell us why that alternative view matters..d-undefined, .lh-undefined { background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2) !important; }.d-undefined, .lh-undefined { background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5) !important; }1Troy Hicks With this potential social function, we are reminded that annotation is not neutral as it helps those who add notes to texts produce new discourses and knowledge.

      I wonder how better, big data being overlaid on virtual reality may be helpful to the currently marginalized in the future? Would it be useful to have shared data about businesses and practices that tend to marginalize people further? I recall an African-American comedian recently talking about the Confederate Flag in a (Netflix?) comedy special. They indicated that the flag actually had some worthwhile uses and reminisced driving on rural highways at night looking for a place to stay. When they saw that flag flying over a motel, they knew better to keep driving and stay at another hotel further down the road. In this case, the flag over the hotel not-so-subtly annotated the establishment itself.

      I perceive a lot of social slights and institutionalized racism as being of a marginal sort which are designed to be bothersome to some while going wholly unnoticed by others. What if it were possible to aggregate the data on a broader basis to bring these sorts of marginal harms to the forefront for society to see them? As an example, consider big companies doing marginal harms to a community's environment over time, but going generally unnoticed until the company has long since divested and/or disappeared. It's hard to sue them for damages decades later, but if one could aggregate the bigger harms upfront and show those annotated/aggregated data up front, then they could be stopped before they got started.

      As a more concrete example, the Trump Management Corporation was hit with a consent decree in the early 1970's for prejudicial practices against people of color including evidence that was subpoenaed showing that applications for people of color were annotated with a big "C" on them. Now consider if all individuals who had made those applications had shared some of their basic data into a pool that could have been accessed and analyzed by future applicants, then perhaps the Trumps would have been caught far earlier. Individuals couldn't easily prove discrimination because of the marginal nature of the discrimination, but data in aggregate could have potentially saved the bigger group.

    2. And would a hip hop fan question, much less downvote, a “verified” Genius annotation authored by Kendrick Lamar that explains the meaning behind his music?

      But if we're going to consider music as art, isn't a lot of the value and power of art in the "eye of the beholder"? To some extent art's value is in the fact that it can have multiple interpretations. From this perspective, once it's been released, Lamar's music isn't "his" anymore, it becomes part of a broader public that will hear and interpret it as they want to. So while Lamar may go back and annotate what he may have meant at the time as an "expert", doesn't some of his art thereby lose some power in that he is tacitly stating that he apparently didn't communicate his original intent well?

      By comparison and for contrast one could take the recent story of Donald Trump's speech (very obviously written by someone else) about the recent mass shootings and compare them with the polar opposite message he spews on an almost daily basis from his Twitter account. See: https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/teleprompter-trump-meets-twitter-trump-as-the-president-responds-to-mass-slayings/2019/08/05/cdd8ea78-b799-11e9-b3b4-2bb69e8c4e39_story.html

    3. mmentary. It also includes many annotated newspaper and magazine articles.An articMaha Bali2 weeks agowould be nice to include a screenshot. Also, I feel like I need to read up on Cambodian history to understand the significance of this particular royal - you don’t explicitly talk about how he is using power here. Was he trying to influence public opinion, was he just annotating for his own knowledge and learning, what kind of power is at play here?(I also wonder if the whole leaders having “right to express freely their view” does not work to anyone’s favor in the case of Donald Trump, so I would contest this strongly. That freedom of expression for political leaders maybe should be weighted differently than for the general population, no? As it has broader consequences for the entire country or even the world…

      I nearly added it above in the opening, but Maha’s comment reminds me of it again. In a countercultural way, a web developer created a browser plugin that will re-format all of Donald Trump’s tweets to appear as if they were written in crayon by an eight year old: http://maketrumptweetseightagain.com/

      While not technically annotation in a “traditional” form discussed in the text so far—though close from the perspective of the redaction technique mentioned above—, by reformatting the font of Trumps tweets, it completely changes their context, meaning, and political weight.

  14. Jul 2019
    1. When people do inexplicable things, it’s always tempting to project qualities onto them that would offer a more innocuous explanation of their behavior than bad judgment, fecklessness, or stupidity. And this particular bias has infected contemporary political analysis with a virulence that rivals Ebola. Even when the subject’s motives are as transparent as Donald Trump’s, there will always be a class of pundit who insists that Trump is playing 3-D chess, when, as one anonymous staffer put it, “more often than not he’s just eating the pieces.” 
    1. Noam Chomsky: One of the most appropriate comments I’ve seen on Trump’s foreign policy appeared in an article in The New Republic written by David Roth, the editor of a sports blog: “The spectacle of expert analysts and thought leaders parsing the actions of a man with no expertise or capacity for analysis is the purest acid satire — but less because of how badly that expert analysis has failed than because of how sincerely misplaced it is … there is nothing here to parse, no hidden meanings or tactical elisions or slow-rolled strategic campaign.” That seems generally accurate. This is a man, after all, who dismisses the information and analyses of his massive intelligence system in favor of what was said this morning on “Fox and Friends,” where everyone tells him how much they love him. With all due skepticism about the quality of intelligence, this is sheer madness considering the stakes.
  15. Jun 2019
    1. In Trump’s first TV ad of the presidential primary in 2015, he used an image of a mass of immigrants; fact-checkers revealed the picture was in fact taken in Morocco.

      Yet another example of Trump anchoring himself in lies and disinformation.

    1. During her confirmation hearing she did not discuss her family’s extensive ties to the Chinese maritime industry, and she did not disclose the various Chinese accolades she had received. The Senate’s written questionnaire requires nominees to list all honorary positions.
  16. Apr 2019
    1. Under OLC's analysis, Congress can permissibly criminalize ce1tain obstructive conduct by the President, such as suborning perjury, intimidating witnesses, or fabricating evidence, because those prohibitions raise no separation-of-powers questions. See Application of 28 U.S.C. § 458 to Presidential Appointments of Federal Judges, 19 Op. O.L.C. at 357 n.11. The Constitution does not authorize the President to engage in such conduct, and those actions would transgress the President's duty to "take Care that the Laws be faithfully executed." U.S. CONST. ART IT, §§ 3. In view of those clearly permissible applications of the obstruction statutes to the President, Franklin's holding that the President is entirely excluded from a statute absent a clear statement would not apply in this context.

      Since the DoJ won't indict a sitting president, here's a direct suggestion of what Congress could do.

    2. if we had confidence after a thorough investigation of the facts that the President clearly did not commit obstruction of justice, we would so state. Based on the facts and the applicable legal standards, we are unable to reach that judgment. Accordingly, while this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him.

      TL;DR

      This summary is not what Trump or even Barr have been indicating in their communications.

      Barr's statement on the day of the release of the redacted report: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7aHPFh2HfSM

    3. The President's efforts to influence the investigation were mostly unsuccessful, but that is largely because the persons who surrounded the President declined to carry out orders or accede to his requests.

      So the better judgement of others has apparently kept Trump out of trouble?

  17. Mar 2019
    1. four goals

      Ivanka's restatement of the Board's four goals, stated in more detail elsewhere.

    2. Tim — Apple

      Here's how Trump's now infamous possible misstatement has been transcribed, not as a mistake, nor with a slash ("to save time & words"), but with an em dash, suggesting that Trump was thanking both Tim, and his company Apple, together in shorthand.

    1. President Trump will ask Congress on Monday for $8.6 billion in additional funding to build a wall along the United States border with Mexico, a person familiar with the details said on Sunday.

      Hi Dick!

    1. the claim that russian oligarchs purchased trump assents to help him finance the campaign is a HUGE claim yet somehow muller dint got that or if he did he let trump in power to this day

  18. Feb 2019
    1. Responding to Axios' reporting, White House press secretary Sarah Sanders emailed this statement: "President Trump has a different leadership style than his predecessors and the results speak for themselves."

      They just don't say very much or anything very good.

  19. Dec 2018
    1. Rather than a complete totalitarianism based on fear and blocking of information the newer methods include demonizing online mediums, and mobilizing armies of supporters or paid employees who muddy the online waters with misinformation, information glut, doubt, confusion, harrasment, and dis-traction, making it hard for ordinary people to navigate the networked pub-lic sphere, and sort facts from fiction, truth from hoaxes.

      Sometimes it seems like Trump does this as a one man band.

    1. He lost to New York billionaire Donald Trump,

      Is he really a "billionaire"?! I thought the Times' own reporting had refuted this pretty soundly?

    2. He negotiated the North American Free Trade Agreement with Canada and Mexico, a measure that was ratified by the Senate in President Bill Clinton’s first term.

      Interesting that he dies on the same day that Trump declares victory over the death of NAFTA.

  20. Nov 2018
    1. A lot of Democrats believe in what is called Enlightenment reasoning, and that if you just tell people the facts, they’ll reach the right conclusion. That just isn’t true.
    2. I take your point, but I wonder if Trump is just kryptonite for a liberal democratic system built on a free press.

      The key words being "free press" with free meaning that we're free to exert intelligent editorial control.

      Editors in the early 1900's used this sort of editorial control not to give fuel to racists and Nazis and reduce their influence.Cross reference: Face the Racist Nation from On the Media.

      Apparently we need to exert the same editorial control with respect to Trump, who not incidentally is giving significant fuel to the racist fire as well.

    1. President Trump

      The start of Corey DeAngelis's reactions to Trump's 2018 State of the Union address.

    2. what would be the point of turning private schools into the same types of institutions that are failing these children in the first place?

      This seems to presume that public funding is the reason public education is "failing".

    1. Mr. Trump intervened directly to suppress stories about his alleged sexual encounters with women

      The evidence of Trump’s involvement in the payments is legally significant, as it backs up Cohen’s claim that Trump directed payments that were found to have been in violation of federal law. The most damning evidence of all, however, isn’t just regarding Trump’s involvement in the payments, but the details of discussions of a cover-up.

      ...

      This is problematic for Trump, as campaign finance violations, such as illegal corporate contributions or donations that exceed the maximum allowable amount, require willful violation of federal law. Trump’s denials and discussion of how to keep his name out of it would help support allegations that he knew the payments were illegal.

      Source: https://lawandcrime.com/high-profile/what-the-bombshell-report-on-stormy-daniels-karen-mcdougal-payoffs-means-for-trump-legally/

  21. Oct 2018
    1. trump isn't taken seriously want for profit of war/ money in general public 1/3 in favor republicans 50% trump doesn't give up easy

  22. Sep 2018
  23. Aug 2018
    1. Perhaps this very prospect of centuries of boredom at the end of history will serve to get history started once again.

      Has it started again with nationalism, racism, and Trump?

    2. anomie

      I feel like this word captures very well the exact era of Trumpian Republicanism in which we find ourselves living.

    1. Both books belong to one of today’s most important genres: the Not-About-Trump-But-Also-Sort-Of-About-Trump, or N.A.T.B.A.S.O.A.T., book.
    1. Finally it is worth noting that trust, through the theory of social capital, has been connected with long-term economic growth—even though these results are based on regressions using extremely sparse datasets.

      And this is an example of how Trump is hurting the economy.

    1. It has become banal to point out that almost any of these would have constituted a monumental scandal under any other president, but it remains true and important.
    2. The most important takeaway Tuesday is that the president’s own former personal attorney pleaded guilty to breaking campaign-finance laws at his alleged direction.
    1. In other words, Trump picked this fight—obviously poltical—because he thinks he can win it, that it works for him.

    1. Whom exactly were we trusting with our care? Why did we decide to trust them in the first place? Who says that only certain kinds of people are allowed to give us the answers?

      Part of the broader cultural eschewing of science as well? Is this part of what put Trump and celebrities in charge?

  24. Jul 2018
    1. A 2016 Lancet study found that universal breast-feeding would prevent 800,000 child deaths a year across the globe and yield $300 billion in savings from reduced health care costs and improved economic outcomes for those reared on breast milk.

      Pure corruption here. Protectionism to prop up profits of approximately 630 million versus major benefits and savings of 300 billion. Even if you look at the calculus of the entire industry of 70 billion it becomes a no brainer.

  25. Mar 2018
    1. Relative deprivation refers to the experience of being deprived of something to which one believes they are entitled. It is the discontent felt when one compares their position in life to others who they feel are equal or inferior but have unfairly had more success than them.

      Decline.

    1. argument from authority (e.g., President Richard Nixon should be re-elected because he has a secret plan to end the war in Southeast Asia — but because it was secret, there was no way for the electorate to evaluate it on its merits; the argument amounted to trusting him because he was President: a mistake, as it turned out)

      Everytime I hear Trump say "trust me", I think of this.

  26. Feb 2018
    1. My second supplemental text is another tweet from Trump -- . The tone in which Trump chooses to discuss the issue of illegal immigration is that of disrespect and vilification. Phrases like "total catastrophe", "deadly catch-and-release", and frequent use of capitalization both visual and linguistic modes creates a narrative of aggression, and from the way that he chose to deliver this message, it becomes easy to identify his audience (anger anti-immigration advocates). The visual mode aspect of this tweet aims to draw attention to certain words, drawing more attention to those specific ideas. This supplemental text helps me connect my understanding of the usage of linguistic and visual modes to create an effective way to communicate (in this case, this tweet did its job, making me pretty agitated).

    2. Donald Trump has quickly become the king of multimodal communication-- specifically on Twitter. The supplemental texts I chose were a couple of tweets from Trump's page. In this tweet, he is addressing the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High school in a way that his other presidential predecessors have not; through a crudely manufactured tweet with a picture of him holding a thumps-up with the victims in the hospital. However, this raises a question-- was it appropriate to address such sensitive matter in this mode? Twitter was designed to be a social media outlet with easily consumable tweets, limited to 180 characters or less (now 280). In the linguistic mode, Trump seemed to be lacking the "development and coherency of individual words and ideas", watering down a topic of great significance to a couple bytes of information on the internet. This tweet and its subsequent response parallels with the criticism received by Carl-Henric Svanberg, where his choice of words let to a severe backlash from the public. This time, Trump's choice of delivery caused a wave of infuriated responses, linking Svanberg and Trump in a group of "We Can't Get Our Point Across Appropriately Club).

      The link--https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/964724390637244417

  27. Nov 2017
    1. “You Can’t Go Any Lower”: Inside the West Wing, Trump Is Apoplectic as Allies Fear ImpeachmentAfter Monday’s indictments, the president blamed Jared Kushner in a call to Steve Bannon, while others are urging him to take off the gloves with Robert Mueller.
  28. Oct 2017
    1. Multiple administration officials told me there was a lengthy debate inside the Trump administration about the summit, but officials close to Trump were concerned the president did not want to stay in the region for so long and worried he could get cranky, leading to unpredictable or undiplomatic behavior.
    1. Trump noticeably avoided talking about gun control when he was asked about it, saying that he would speak on the matter with the police as a general assembly. In 2000, trump had different standpoint on gun control, saying that he wanted a ban on assault guns. Personally I think background checks should be placed on people with accounts of a 1 or more felonies. And that weapons with a lethality higher than a pistol's should be restricted during a person's review as a pistol is enough for self defense.

  29. Sep 2017
    1. : Trump's 2017 U.N. speech trans

      Advocates for strong nation states as a way to elevate the human conditions. Argues that the UN post-WWII has been continually rigged against America. Smaller nations have broken the international system.

      • Uses the word "sovereignty" 22 times — Voyant textual analysis.
      • Nationalist document.
    1. Advocates for strong nation states as a way to elevate the human conditions. Argues that the UN post-WWII has been continually rigged against America. Smaller nations have broken the international system.

      • Uses the word "sovereignty" 22 times — Voyant textual analysis.
      • Nationalist document.
  30. Aug 2017
    1. Then he whored for his Virginia winery on the way out the door

      This was his response to questions about whether he had talked with Heather Heyer's mom and visiting CVille. Asked if we knew he had a house in CVille. Disgusting!

  31. Jul 2017
    1. President Trump’s lawyers and aides are scouring the professional and political backgrounds of investigators hired by the special counsel Robert S. Mueller III

      This seems to be a pattern for Trump - constantly jumping into battles in which he's overmatched. The battle of wills and trust with the former head of the FBI, Comey always seemed like a losing effort. Similarly, investigating (and thereby irritating) the investigators seems like a good way to motivate people who have made extremely successful careers in this field.

    1. “With every attempt at transparency Donald Trump Jr. digs himself more deeply into the hole of criminality,” he told me via email. “He appears to have gone into that meeting—and likely others—looking for something of value—dirt on Hillary Clinton—from sources he should have stayed away from. His judgment was bad, to say the least.”

      Trump Jr

    1. The president is not only a former reality-show star, but one whose fame is based more on performance than reality

      But is Trump's position the result of an excess of something, as Baudrillard is arguing? Or is this just the facile observation that Trump's accomplishments are not really that real.

    2. Fredric Jameson

      the US gateway drug to pomo

    3. this very moment in America, where media overload is destroying the sense of a shared public reality

      this is a key part of the argument: media overload as a causal factor

  32. Jun 2017
    1. what a great job you are doing

      As pointed out in this sister article (https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2017/05/trump-isis-losers/527925/) Trump only seems to be able to put things into perspective by either winners or losers. He doesn't seem to be able to see any of the other subtleties.

  33. May 2017
    1. eighty-five million dollars for Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, to hire hundreds of new agents; $1.2 billion for ICE to expand its detention facilities; and another hundred and thirty-one million dollars to institute a mandatory program for employers to run immigration background checks on potential hires.

      Like this.

    1. rump's ousted National Security Advisor Michael Flynn, who resigned over his contacts with Russian Ambassador Sergei Kislyak, has yet to honor the Senate Intel Committee's subpoena, per the AP.

      Wow!

    1. Russia could use that detail to help identify the U.S. ally or intelligence capability involved. Officials said the capability could be useful for other purposes, possibly providing intelligence on Russia’s presence in Syria. Moscow would be keenly interested in identifying that source and perhaps disrupting it.

      This shows how dangerous Trump is to our national security.

    2. Trump revealed the city in the Islamic State’s territory where the U.S. intelligence partner detected the threat.

      Seems to be a very serious threat to a source. Does this constitute treason?

    3. Trump seemed to be boasting about his inside knowledge of the looming threat. “I get great intel. I have people brief me on great intel every day,” the president said, according to an official with knowledge of the exchange.

      Consistent with his narcissism and grandiosity but also with his pathological insecurity.

    1. El director en funciones del FBI contradice a la Casa Blanca sobre Comey

      Lo último de trump

    Tags

    Annotators

    URL

    1. There was "something wrong with" Mr. Comey

      This is a Trump tell. He projects his crazy onto others.

    2. teaching the president* the secret to talking to the portraits in the hall

      This is what Nixon did.

    1. We’re the highest-taxed nation in the world.

      Not true! Well below the average.

    2. I came up with it a couple of days ago and I thought it was good. It’s what you have to do.

      Thinks he invented the term.

    3. Asked to flesh out his vision for a fair NAFTA in more detail, he can only come up with synonyms for “big”

      Can't answer the question. Reverts to general simple words. Reagan would refer to familiar objects as "Things"

    4. tries and fails to think of the word “reciprocity.” (“We need reciprocality

      Inability to recall or correctly pronounce a word is a sign of cognitive decline/dementia.

    1. On March 20, 2017, during public testimony to the House Intelligence Committee, FBI director James Comey confirmed the existence of an FBI investigation into Russian interference and Russian links to the Trump campaign, including the question of whether there had been any coordination between the campaign and the Russians.[24] He said the investigation began in July 2016 and was "still in its early stages".[25] Comey made the unusual decision to reveal the ongoing investigation to Congress, citing benefit to the public good.[93]

      Comey's public confirmation of a FBI investigation.

  34. Apr 2017
    1. Taiwanese identity grew more distinct from Mainland China

      Taiwan and its attempts to legitimise itself as a sovereign state seperate from china -

      "Trump infuriated China’s leadership when he spoke to Tsai on the phone and later made separate comments questioning the longstanding “one China” policy, under which the US notionally accepts Beijing’s view that Taiwan is part of China. The US does not officially host Taiwanese leaders. Taiwan has been self-governing and de facto independent since the end of China’s civil war. Beijing regards it as a renegade province".

    2. female president

      Tsai Ing-wen

  35. Mar 2017
  36. www.nytimes.com www.nytimes.com