13 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2019
  2. Dec 2018
  3. app.getpocket.com app.getpocket.com
    1. When you look at those cities, you’ll also find some of the most innovative solutions to the way we conduct commerce. Not one-hour delivery or meal kits on demand, but the boom in a parallel retail model that is decidedly social and human focused.

      Less efficiency driven and more people/human oriented

  4. Jun 2017
    1. Ed Finn, on the other hand, seeks to hold the technology industry to account: he believes we need “more readers, more critics,” posing questions about who technology serves, and to what ends.

      Amen!

    2. Hartley too readily accepts Silicon Valley’s flattering self-descriptions of its values and vision for the world. The positivity of entrepreneurship does not sit comfortably with the skeptical outlook that the liberal arts nurture, and Hartley fully embraces entrepreneurship.

      Interesting. Not critical, not liberal arts, enough.

    3. Hartley believes that liberal arts insights can right the ship: “We can pair fuzzies and techies to train our algorithms to better sift for, and mitigate, our shared human foibles.”

      I'm somewhat optimistic about this. Of it actually happens...

    1. a techno-libertarianism that was contemptuous of most government attempts to regulate disruptive innovation.

      Turns out this has been a bad look. I wonder if it'll really cost Uber, though.

    2. radical libertarian ideology and monopolistic greed of many Silicon Valley entrepreneurs helped to decimate the livelihood of musicians and is now undermining the communal idealism of the early internet.

      Truth.

  5. May 2017
    1. Every time you check your phone and see a like or comment or retweet, your brain releases a little bit of dopamine, the neurotransmitter associated with reward.

      Device addiction

  6. Sep 2016
    1. Even some of the world's largest companies live in constant "fear of Google"; sudden banishment from search results, YouTube, AdWords, Adsense, or a dozen other Alphabet-owned platforms can be devastating.
  7. Jul 2016
    1. Google’s chief culture officer

      Her name is Stacy Savides Sullivan. She was already Google’s HR director by the time the CCO title was added to her position, in 2006. Somewhat surprising that Sullivan’d disagree with Teller, given her alleged role:

      Part of her job is to protect key parts of Google’s scrappy, open-source cultural core as the company has evolved into a massive multinational.

      And her own description:

      "I work with employees around the world to figure out ways to maintain and enhance and develop our culture and how to keep the core values we had in the very beginning–a flat organization, a lack of hierarchy, a collaborative environment–to keep these as we continue to grow and spread them and filtrate them into our new offices around the world.

      Though “failure bonuses” may sound a bit far-fetched in the abstract, they do fit with most everything else we know about Googloids’ “corporate culture” (and the Silicon Valley Ideology (aka Silicon Valley Narrative), more generally).

  8. Jun 2015
    1. Celebrities joined the service,

      Rule number one of Silicon Valley: get (pay? bribe?) famous people to use it.

    2. often winning the company’s weekly “Getting [expletive] Done” award,

      Ah, #startuplife.

    3. Usually it’s not simply because the ideas are bad (although some certainly are),