16 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. One of the significant differences between the two is that a call to a partially applied function returns the result right away, not another function down the currying chain; this distinction can be illustrated clearly for functions whose arity is greater than two.
  2. Oct 2020
  3. Aug 2020
    1. As a result, I end up quoting multiple people, sometimes quoting several people back-to-back, before even writing my reply. In those instances it feels like I'm not properly citing those individuals. I feel like it might seem I'm not providing new readers appropriate context for a given quote. It might also be implied that separate quotes are from the same person, leading to mis-attribution.
  4. Jun 2020
  5. May 2020
    1. Like all other consent under the GDPR, consenting to cookies needs to be a clear affirmative action. An example is clicking through an opt-in box or choosing settings from the menu. Pay attention to not have pre-ticked boxes on the consent form!
    1. The GDPR requires consent to be opt-in. It defines consent as “freely given, specific, informed and unambiguous” given by a “clear affirmative action.” It is not acceptable to assign consent through the data subject’s silence or by supplying “pre-ticked boxes.”
  6. Apr 2020
    1. In patients with clear indications for operation, essential radiographs should be taken, and the patient should be transported to the OR immediately. Such patients include those with blunt trauma and massive hemothorax, those with penetrating trauma and an initial chest tube output of >1 L, and those with abdominal trauma and ultrasound evidence of extensive hemoperitoneum.
  7. Mar 2020
    1. One of the main threads of the GDPR is providing clear and transparent information to individuals about data collected, how it is processed, and the lawful basis for this processing.
  8. May 2019
    1. This is spot on. An idea on its own does nothing. Execution and actually doing the hard work are the most important thing in any creative endeavour.

      This blog is very good, high signal and low noise. The dense version of this idea that has stuck with me is that the thing we're aiming for (productivity, make-world-better-stuff, doing good) is a multiplicative-product of both hustle (physical work, pressing buttons, saying words that other people hear) and the thinking part. That is, long term goal completion is hustle (doing stuff) * thought (knowing what to do)

      I may technically disagree with the "most important thing" part, but it needs some sort of strong emphasis. Hustle modifies ideas in a times-ish (multiplying) way, so if you've got zero hustle, you don't really have anything

      One way to do world-bettering is to just have enough hustle to outsource the hustle (get other people to act on your ideas), or alternately if you have tons of hustle, then you can take good ideas which aren't going anywhere.

      Knowing the difference between bad and good ideas is one of the core problems with the super-connected society/net we're in. The solution to the problem is too large for this margin.

  9. Dec 2017
    1. The IRB helps to make sure that the risks of the proposed research are minimized, the benefits outweigh the risks, the research is carried out in a fair manner, and the informed consent procedure is adequate.

      Clear and concise explanation of exactly what IRBs do.

  10. Apr 2017