9 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2021
    1. Yes. There came a point. We were in the [Pause] process of getting our permanent residency card in order to be able to go to school, and the lawyer let my mother know that me and my sister—my other sister—were not going to make it because once you hit eighteen, you're no longer under the case that you originally filed, so the best option for us would be adoption. We would be adopted by an American citizen in order to get our American status fixed, and that was something my mom and I contemplated for a long, long time, and she was going to go through with it, but my dad put a huge stop to that and was like, "That's not happening. You're stupid. That's not a thing. These are my kids. You're not letting that happen."

      Eligibility - permanent residency - adoption

  2. Apr 2021
  3. Mar 2021
  4. Feb 2021
  5. Dec 2020
    1. Notions, Notes, Ideas and work notes

      My equivalent, as best as I can tell, is:

      • Permanent notes (atomic, linked concepts) = Notions
      • Temporary notes (half-formed thoughts, links, snippets, etc.) = Notes
      • Temporary notes initially, which later become permanent notes = Ideas (see later comment about why)
      • Admin notes (projects, tasks, meetings, etc.) = Work notes
  6. May 2020
    1. You should construct evergreen (permanent) notes based on concepts, not related to a source (e.g. a book) or an author.

      Your mental models are compression functions. You make them more powerful by trying to use them on new information. Are you able to compress the new information with an already acquired function? Yes, then you've discovered an analogous concept across two different sources. Sort of? Then maybe there's an important difference, or maybe it's a clue that your compression function needs updating. And finally, no? Then perhaps this is an indication that you need to construct a new mental model – a new compression function.

    1. Instead of having a task like “write an outline of the first chapter,” you have a task like “find notes which seem relevant.” Each step feels doable. This is an executable strategy (see Executable strategy).

      Whereas Dr. Sönke Ahrens in How to Make Smart Notes seemed to be saying that the writing of a permanent note (~evergreen note) is a unit of knowledge work with predictable effort & time investment (as well as searching for relevant notes), Andy emphasizes only the note searching activity in this context.

  7. Apr 2020
  8. May 2015