31 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2022
    1. Snail mail can be too slow, and email isn't secure. So that leaves us with the decades-old, but still reliable, fax.

      email is secure enough. Why do people keep perpetuating this myth?

  2. Feb 2022
    1. Hence an email address/mailbox/addr-spec is "local-part@domain"; "local-part" is composed of one or more of 'word' and periods; "word" can be an "atom" which can include anything except "specials", control characters or blank/space; and specials (the *only* printable ASCII characters [other than space, if you call space "printable"] *excluded* from being a valid "local-part") are: ()<>@,;:\".[] Therefore by the official standard for email on the internet, the plus sign is as much a legal character in the local-part of an email address as "a" or "_" or "-" or most any other symbol you see on the main part of a standard keyboard.
    2. There's a common design flaw on many many websites that require an email address to register; most recently I came across this bug on CNet's download.com site: for some reason they don't accept me when I try to register an email address containing a "+", and they then send me back saying my address is invalid. It isn't!
    3. "+" is a completely valid character in an email address; as defined by the internet messaging standard published in 1982(!) RFC 822 (page 8 & 9)... Any website claiming anything else is wrong by definition, plus they are prohibiting me and many fellow anti-spam activists from tracking where inbound spam comes from:
  3. Oct 2021
  4. Aug 2021
  5. May 2021
  6. Mar 2021
    1. Ownership is the critical point here. Ownership in email in the same way we own a paperback: We recognize that we (largely) control the email subscriber lists, they are portable, they are not governed by unknowable algorithmic timelines.3 And this isn’t ownership yoked to a company or piece of software operating on quarterly horizon, or even multi-year horizon, but rather to a half-century horizon. Email is a (the only?) networked publishing technology with both widespread, near universal adoption,4 and history. It is, as they say, proven.

      This is very IndieWeb in flavor.

      It reminds me of Stanley Meyer who would read newspapers and magazines every day and cut out articles which he put into envelopes for his friends and children and mailed out every couple of weeks. Essentially his own newsletter, but by snail mail.

  7. Feb 2021
    1. URI::MailTo::EMAIL_REGEXP

      First time I've seen someone create a validator by simply matching against URI::MailTo::EMAIL_REGEXP from std lib. More often you see people copying and pasting some really long regex that they don't understand and is probably not loose enough. It's much better, though, to simply reuse a standard one from a library — by reference, rather than copying and pasting!!

    1. Direct Express Dispute Processing PO Box 540190 Omaha, NE 68154-0190
    2. i2c, Inc.                  ATTN: Rob Seiler                  100 Redwood Shores Parkway                  Suite 100                  Redwood City, CA 94065
  8. Dec 2020
    1. 2.3.1. Mail Objects SMTP transports a mail object. A mail object contains an envelope and content. The SMTP envelope is sent as a series of SMTP protocol units (described in Section 3). It consists of an originator address (to Klensin Standards Track [Page 11] RFC 5321 SMTP October 2008 which error reports should be directed), one or more recipient addresses, and optional protocol extension material

      The SMTP envelope is sent as a series of SMTP protocol units (described in Section 3). It consists of

      • an originator address (to which error reports should be directed),

      MAIL FROM that refers to the originator (a.k.a., reverse path, backward-pointing address) of the request

      • one or more recipient addresses,

      Multiple RCPT TO for each "to:" rfc822 message header in the mail data (see annotation)

      • and optional protocol extension material.

      DATA (see below)


      (See also envelope-vs-mail tags.)

    2. When the RFC 822 format ([28], [4]) is being used, the mail data include the header fields such as those named Date, Subject, To, Cc, and From.

      This just answered my question regarding the quote from "Postfix: The Definitive Guide":

      ENVELOPE ADDRESSES AND MESSAGE HEADERS A common source of confusion for email users is the fact that the To: address in email message headers has nothing to do with where a message is actually delivered. The envelope address controls message delivery. In practice, when you compose a message and provide your MUA with a To: address, your MUA uses that same address as the envelope destination address, but this is not required nor is it always the case. From the MTA’s point of view, message headers are part of the content of an email message. The delivery of a message is determined by the addresses specified during the SMTP conversation. These addresses are the envelope addresses , and they are the only thing that determine where messages go. See Section 2.2.8 later in the chapter for an explanation of the SMTP protocol.

      Mailing lists and spam are common examples of when the envelope destination address differs from the To: address of the message headers.

      Also an answer to this question.

    3. An SMTP-capable host SHOULD support both the alias and the list models of address expansion for multiple delivery. When a message is delivered or forwarded to each address of an expanded list form, the return address in the envelope ("MAIL FROM:") MUST be changed to be the address of a person or other entity who administers the list. However, in this case, the message header section (RFC 5322 [4]) MUST be left unchanged; in particular, the "From" field of the header section is unaffected.

      Another section that serves well to understand the difference between email data and SMTP envelope.

    4. To expand an alias, the recipient mailer simply replaces the pseudo- mailbox address in the envelope with each of the expanded addresses in turn; the rest of the envelope and the message body are left unchanged. The message is then delivered or forwarded to each expanded address.

      This annotation explains what this paragraph means and dispels my confusion regarding how 3mails with multiple recipients will get processed (also, SMTP envelope vs mail data).

      MS Outlook's "distribution list" is the same as an rfc5321 alias.

    5. The return (backward-pointing) address in the envelope is changed so that all error messages generated by the final deliveries will be returned to a list administrator, not to the message originator, who generally has no control over the contents of the list and will typically find error messages annoying.
      1. This the only difference between an SMTP alias and list; expanding recipients to RCPT commands is the same.
      1. Another great example to highlight the difference between SMTP envelope and mail data: the envelope's MAIL FROM (see annotation) is different from to the mail data's rfc822 From:.
    6. If the Klensin Standards Track [Page 19] RFC 5321 SMTP October 2008 recipient is known not to be a deliverable address, the SMTP server returns a 550 reply, typically with a string such as "no such user - " and the mailbox name (other circumstances and reply codes are possible).

      Will the entire transaction be canceled? "Transaction" in the name of this a section implies yes, but what if all the recipients are valid?

      See replies below but the answer is no; an RCPT command is specified for each recipient in the mail data, these RCPT commands will be evaluated in sequence,, and any SMTP (error) notifications will be sent to the address in the MAIL FROM command (which is not necessarily the same as the mail data's From: header).

    7. the reverse-path (originator) address specification command (MAIL)

      Sometimes "reverse path" or "originator" address is also referred to "backward-pointing" address (and those instances also refer to the MAIL command mostly).

  9. Jul 2020
  10. Jun 2020
    1. dark pattern design will ensure the opt out — if there is one — will be near invisible; Greyscale text on a grey background is the usual choice.

      The often used method on promotional emails and/or advertising website.

  11. Mar 2019
    1. Carson Farmer noted that GMAIL is fundamentally a better user experience because individuals didn’t need to run their own protocols or set up their own servers.

      If so, why then not use ProtonMail that does not serve ads, abuse your data, and gives you the option for built-in e-mail encryption?

  12. Apr 2018
    1. Use the built-in compose-mail to send mails.

      Maybe no Check and see if this will open external mail program

  13. Sep 2015
  14. Feb 2015