68 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2022
    1. The problem is that the caller may write yield instead of block.call. The code I have given is possible caller's code. Extended method definition in my library can be simplified to my code above. Client provides block passed to define_method (body of a method), so he/she can write there anything. Especially yield. I can write in documentation that yield simply does not work, but I am trying to avoid that, and make my library 100% compatible with Ruby (alow to use any language syntax, not only a subset).

      An understandable concern/desire: compatibility

      Added new tag for this: allowing full syntax to be used, not just subset

  2. Sep 2022
    1. I took along my son, who had never had any fresh water up his nose and who had seen lily pads only from train windows. On the journey over to the lake I began to wonder what it would be like. I wondered how time would have marred this unique, this holy spot--the coves and streams, the hills that the sun set behind, the camps and the paths behind the camps. I was sure that the tarred road would have found it out and I wondered in what other ways it would be desolated. It is strange how much you can remember about places like that once you allow your mind to return into the grooves which lead back. You remember one thing, and that suddenly reminds you of another thing. I guess I remembered clearest of all the early mornings, when the lake was cool and motionless, remembered how the bedroom smelled of the lumber it was made of and of the wet woods whose scent entered through the screen. The partitions in the camp were thin and did not extend clear to the top of the rooms, and as I was always the first up I would dress softly so as not to wake the others, and sneak out into the sweet outdoors and start out in the canoe, keeping close along the shore in the long shadows of the pines. I remembered being very careful never to rub my paddle against the gunwale for fear of disturbing the stillness of the cathedral.

  3. Aug 2022
    1. fragments_shored · 1 hr. agoI don't have a specific edition to offer, but you asked "why don't publishers publish more books with scholar's margins?" and the answer is because it's expensive. More white space means more paper and binding material, longer time for the print run, more customization on the press, heavier and therefore more costly to ship. Book publishing operates on a very thin margin so it's not cost-effective, especially when most consumers don't care about the extra margin space and/or aren't willing to absorb the costs in the purchase price.What can consumers do to encourage publishers to change these practices? Be willing to spend the $80 for the scholar's margins instead of expecting to pay the normal $5 to $10.

      The razor thin margins argument only works from the bookseller's perspective, and this is primarily due to excessive competition from Amazon. Beyond this, sure the product would be slightly more expensive, but (pun intended) only marginally so. Revenue margins on classics written before 1924 (which most of this class of books is) are also significantly higher because they're public domain and the company isn't paying royalties on them. Additionally, at scale, a company with a series like Penguin Classics has a pretty solid understanding of print runs and demand to more easily allow them to innovate like this. Take the Penguin Classics copy of Thucydides' The History of the Peloponnesian War which lists for $20 in paperback and sells for $12.00 on Amazon. (You'll notice that Amazon is essentially giving away their entire discount (aka margin, usually a 40% discount on the list price) here. At a 10,000 copy print run, the cost of the print/paper/print run is in the $2.00 per copy range or lower. Amazon is taking a razor margin for the sale, but Penguin is pocketing almost $10 in pure profit as I'm sure their marketing budget is very near zero here.<br /> They could easily still do very close to this with either larger book margins or even the same text printed on 6 x 9" instead of 5 x 8.25 (or even smaller pulp sizes) so they don't have to reset the entire book for pennies on the dollar at the publisher level. Given that the majority of this market is targeted at students, who could directly use these affordances (and often do but in more cramped space) for the small mark up (particularly in comparison to the $80 copies, which still don't fit the bill, when they exist), I would attribute their non-existence to laziness and lack of imagination on the part of the publishers. Perhaps a smaller publishers like Dover might take on such a project as a means of cheaply, but profitably improving their position in the market? Those making the argument for not marking up these sorts of copies to keep the book pristine for the next reader are missing the point. I also suspect that they haven't recently purchased these sorts of used copies that often go for under $4 on the used market. Even when treated well and not heavily annotated by the first reader, these books are not in good shape and really aren't designed to be read by more than three people. It's also the reason that most libraries don't purchase them. I might buy their argument for the more expensive hardcover collector's market, but not for the pulp mass market books which hold almost no value on the secondary market. Additionally the secondary market for this class of books doesn't usually reflect large value differences between heavily annotated/highlighted texts and those that aren't. Whether they mark them up or not, the first owner is responsible for the largest proportion of depreciated value. Tangentially, I find myself lamenting the cultural practices of prior generations who valued sharing annotated copies of texts with friends and lovers as tokens of their friendship and love. I'm guessing those who vitiate against annotation have never known these practices existed.

  4. Jul 2022
  5. Mar 2022
    1. Each highlighted statement expresses political talking points aligned to induce trump-like support.

      Trump introduced new marketing and strategy, formulated using concepts and metrics mastered by Reality TV and Hollywood and then paired with advertising propaganda and "selling" techniques to create a "Brand". This is after-all Donald Trump, this is what he does, has done and is the only way he has found to make money. Trump built the "brand" (just barely) while teetering on self destruction.

      His charismatic persona became "the glue" that allowed creative narratives to stick to certain types of people in-spite of risk. Trump learned OTJ how to capture a specific type of audience.

      The mistake people make about Trump is assuming his audience to be "Joe Six-Pack", redneck's with limited education! This assumption does not have merit on its own.<br /> * There is a common "follower" theme among his audience that is exploited by those who: * Bought the "licensing rights" to the master-class Trump "how-to" course.

  6. Nov 2021
    1. How people use to write was on Papyrus which was made out of hands and other natural things you find in nature. People also wrote with black and red ink. And they would make those into scrolls. What is papyrus?

  7. Sep 2021
  8. Aug 2021
    1. In April 1863, Carleton gave orders to Colonel Kit Carson to round up the entire Navajo population and escort them to Bosque Redondo. Those who resisted would be shot. Thus began a period of Navajo history called the Long Walk, which remains deeply important to Navajo people today

      Important

  9. Jul 2021
    1. sinful

      This is another word that Miss Clack used a lots in her narrative.

    2. devout

      The word "devout" came out a few thing from Miss Clack's narrative. I assume she is a devout Christian?

    3. alas!

      This is one of words that Miss Clack will use, but Betteredge won't use. However, this word also reveals some personality of Miss Clack, by definition, alas means: "an expression of grief, pity, or concern." By this we can assume Miss Clack might be a sentimental person

  10. Jun 2021
  11. Apr 2021
    1. We are are continuing our commitment to creating our games that are free and widely accessible anyone that is curious by making our game files available under Creative Commons license BY–NC–SA 4.0. That means we will continue offering a full, free print-and-play kit for Pax Pamir, and later this campaign, John Company! Anyone can use, remix, and share the game, so long as they do not use it for commercial purposes. 
    1. A generic trademark, also known as a genericized trademark or proprietary eponym, is a trademark or brand name that, because of its popularity or significance, has become the generic term for, or synonymous with, a general class of products or services, usually against the intentions of the trademark's owner.
  12. Mar 2021
    1. Software that is not currently being used gradually becomes unusable as the remainder of the application changes.
    2. Infrequently used portions of code, such as document filters or interfaces designed to be used by other programs, may contain bugs that go unnoticed. With changes in user requirements and other external factors, this code may be executed later, thereby exposing the bugs and making the software appear less functional.
    1. Another important MicroJS attribute is independence. Ember, Backbone—even Bootstrap to a degree–have hard dependencies on other libraries. For example, all three rely on jQuery. A good MicroJS library stands by itself with no dependencies. There are exceptions to the rule, but in general, any dependency is another small MicrojJS library.
    1. In production, you will never trigger one specific callback or a particular validation, only. Your application will run all code required to create a Song object, for instance. In Trailblazer, this means running the Song::Create operation, and testing that very operation with all its side-effects.
    2. There’s no need to test controllers, models, service objects, etc. in isolation
    3. Run the complete unit with a certain input set, and test the side-effects. This differs to the Rails Way™ testing style, where smaller units of code, such as a specific validation or a callback, are tested in complete isolation. While that might look tempting and clean, it will create a test environment that is not identical to what happens in production.
  13. Feb 2021
    1. found that using only the Pascal-provided control structures, the correct solution was given by only 20% of the subjects, while no subject wrote incorrect code for this problem if allowed to write a return from the middle of a loop.
    1. Operations don't know about HTTP or the environment. You could use an operation in Rails, Hanami, or Roda, it wouldn't know.
  14. Dec 2020
  15. Nov 2020
    1. Many linguists believe that the natural language a person speaks affects how they think. Does the same concept apply to computer languages?
  16. Oct 2020
    1. All validators can be used independently. Inspried by functional programming paradigm, all built in validators are just functions.

      I'm glad you can use it independently like:

      FormValidation.validators.creditCard().validate({
      

      because sometimes you don't have a formElement available like in their "main" (?) API examples:

      FormValidation.formValidation(formElement
      
    1. that does not mean that I am advocating the other extreme–i.e., a templating language that allows a lot of logic. I find such templating languages, especially those that allow the host programming languages to be used inside the template, to be hard to read, hard to maintain, and simply a bad choice.
  17. Sep 2020
    1. Passing the class prop to the root dom element is already a wide spread practice
    2. It's a convention in Svelte to export { className as class } inspired from docs, but it's certainly not required by the compiler, so I don't think the class:directive can/should be assumed here.
    3. On the one hand, it's an unofficial but widely-used practice to do let classNames=''; export { classNames as class }; in components and then apply that class on the top-level DOM element in the component. On the other hand, there are plenty of components out there that don't use this idiom
    1. For a non-monorepo package you can simply point directly to the Github repo. This case is similar, but you want to scope it just to a single package within the repo. For those that make monorepos they don't necessarily need this feature. It's for those that use projects that use monorepos. Telling them to not organize their projects into monorepos doesn't help people who make use of these projects.
    2. If npm installs a git repo, it assumes that the git repo is the package. I don't really know how we could specify a sub-path easily, since all parts of the git url are already used for other things.
    1. This is more a rhetoric question as this seems to be quite hard ;-) There is a long discussion about installing a subfolder of a repository and monorepos in general at the NPM Github issues (yarn misses this feature, too). The thing is that this makes it quite hard to report issues of your project as one can't test the current master easily. Do you recommend a way how to use the latest Github version?
  18. Jul 2020
  19. Mar 2020
    1. Used By

      I like how they have indexed their core code base so they can show in both directions:

      • which other core functions a function uses
      • which other core functions use this function (references)
  20. Dec 2019
  21. Nov 2019
    1. You want to write maintainable tests for your React components. As a part of this goal, you want your tests to avoid including implementation details of your components and rather focus on making your tests give you the confidence for which they are intended. As part of this, you want your testbase to be maintainable in the long run so refactors of your components (changes to implementation but not functionality) don't break your tests and slow you and your team down.
    2. We try to only expose methods and utilities that encourage you to write tests that closely resemble how your web pages are used.
    3. The more your tests resemble the way your software is used, the more confidence they can give you.
    4. Most of the damaging features have to do with encouraging testing implementation details. Primarily, these are shallow rendering, APIs which allow selecting rendered elements by component constructors, and APIs which allow you to get and interact with component instances (and their state/properties) (most of enzyme's wrapper APIs allow this).
  22. Aug 2019
  23. May 2019
    1. homebrewing

      Very grass roots/home brew friendly organization; appeals to sense of independence and optimism; "home grown"

  24. Sep 2018
    1. Snapchat says it reaches 28.5 to 30 million 18-24 year old users in the U.S. According to a recent survey of Instagram users, approximately 32 percent of its 1 billion-strong user base is 18-24.

      Snapchat reaches around 30 million 18-24 year old users; important ages that are more recently able to vote and take political action. Instagram and snapchat are most popular amongst younger users.

  25. Oct 2016
  26. Aug 2015