97 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2022
  2. Jan 2022
  3. Dec 2021
    1. This is because using hyphens instead of underscores makes it easier for Google’s web crawler to compute the information that your website has and create consistent results.
  4. Sep 2021
    1. But it is always important to remember that those are not language concepts. Those are community concepts that only exist in our heads and in the names of some library methods.

      I'm not sure about this. I get what he's saying and agree that singleton methods are nothing but a naming convention for the more fundamental/atomic construct called instance methods (which indeed are the only kind of method that exist in Ruby, depending how you look at it), but I think I would actually say that singleton methods are language concepts because those methods like Object#define_singleton_method, ... are always available in Ruby (without needing to require a standard library first, for example). In other words, I would argue that something belonging in the Ruby core "library" (?) by definition makes it part of the language -- even if it in turn builds on even lower-level Ruby language features/constructs.

    1. There is a huge explanation about why the dot is important quoting issues about DNS and character encoding

      It doesn't seem like the dot, in this context, would have anything to do with/help with either DNS or character encoding

    2. But I realized after a lot of research that the problem was that I did not copy the right URL address from the iTunes API documentation. It should have been https://itunes.apple.com/search?term=jack+johnson. not https://itunes.apple.com/search?term=jack+johnson Notice the dot at the end There is a huge explanation about why the dot is important quoting issues about DNS and character encoding but the truth is you probably do not care. Try adding the dot it might work for you too. When I added the "." everything worked like a charm.
  5. Aug 2021
  6. Jul 2021
  7. Jun 2021
    1. "I am also concerned that despite the best of intentions many of us have not considered adequately what social justice means and entails. I worry that social justice may become simply a “topic du jour” in music education, a phrase easily cited and repeated without careful examination of the assumptions and actions it implicates. That can lead to serious misunderstandings."

  8. May 2021
  9. Apr 2021
    1. (Ideally the run-time library would treat a pipe in the same way as a console, but it seems that most don't.)

      Often/usually treating a pipe/redirect differently is in fact what you want.

      Like if you output to a file, you don't necessarily want colors or real-time progress/status outputted along with it: you want just the bare data to be saved, which can then be filtered in useful ways with other standard tools like grep and sed.

  10. Mar 2021
    1. Maa ngiy waxtaan ak sama xarit.

      Je parle avec mon ami.

      (Note: it says "walking with" but should say "talking with" -- might've been fixed by the time you read this!)

      maa -- me.

      ngiy -- I am.

      waxtaan v. -- conversation, chat, interview. 💬

      ak -- and, with.

      sama -- my.

      xarit bi -- part of a split set; friend. 👯

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QQiWG98Bsys

  11. Feb 2021
    1. The only problem is that our PJAX library is no longer maintained and was preventing us from updating jQuery (ugh). So it had to go.

      https://github.com/MoOx/pjax doesn't say it's no longer maintained (though hasn't been updated in 2 years), and does say that it doesn't use jQuery. Oh well.

  12. Jan 2021
  13. Dec 2020
  14. Nov 2020
  15. Oct 2020
    1. "We should try to find a replacement for omgwtfssl, which is currently used to generate self-signed certificates. The name is inappropriate and unprofessional."
    1. I'm glad they added this site. Instead of just closing such questions as "off topic" on StackOverflow or SuperUser without having them some place appropriate to send them.

  16. Sep 2020
    1. By default, npx will check whether <command> exists in $PATH, or in the local project binaries, and execute that. Calling npx <command> when <command> isn't already in your $PATH will automatically install a package with that name from the NPM registry for you, and invoke it. When it's done, the installed package won’t be anywhere in your globals, so you won’t have to worry about pollution in the long-term. You can prevent this behaviour by providing --no-install option.
  17. Jul 2020
    1. OK is technically an acronym. It comes from the phrase "oll korrect," a humorous alteration of "all correct."

      Was "oll korrect" intended to be a humorous alteration of "all correct" or is it simply due to variations in language? (korrect looks a bit like German. What language could oll be?

  18. May 2020
    1. In some contexts, "ops" refers to operators. Operators were the counterparts to Developers represented in the original coining of the term DevOps.

      I have always believed the Ops was short for Operations, not Operators.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DevOps even confirms that belief.

    1. quantum blockchain

      Do they really use a quantum blockchain? What exactly do they mean by that? Probably just a buzzword they're using to attract interest but aren't actually meaning literally.

    2. Did the marketing team create a new landing page that isn't searchable? Osano is aware of hidden pages and keeps you in the loop about what is loaded where – everywhere on your site.

      How would it "know" about hidden pages unless the site owner told them about their existence? (And if that is the case, how is this anything that Osano can claim as a feature or something that they do?) If it is truly hidden, then a conventional bot/spider wouldn't find it by following links.

    1. Most web browsers are set by default to protect your privacy unless you opt for tracking yourself. For example, Internet Explorer automatically enables its “Do Not Track” option and Google Chrome blocks any 3rd-party cookies by default.
    1. Taxonomy, in a broad sense the science of classification, but more strictly the classification of living and extinct organisms—i.e., biological classification.

      I don't think the "but more strictly" part is strictly accurate.

      Wikipedia authors confirm what I already believed to be true: that the general sense of the word is just as valid/extant/used/common as the sense that is specific to biology:

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taxonomy_(general) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taxonomy_(biology)

    1. after nearly 10 years of continuous improvement

      Not necessarily a good or favorable thing. It might actually be preferable to pick a younger software product that doesn't have the baggage of previous architectural decisions to slow them down. Newer projects can benefit from both (1) the mistakes of previously-originated projects and (2) the knowledge of what technologies/paradigms are popular today; they may therefore be more agile and better able to create something that fits with the current state of the art, as opposite to the state of the art from 10 years ago (which, as we all know, was much different: before the popularity of GraphQL, React, headless CMS, for example).

      Older projects may have more technical debt and have more legacy technologies/paradigms/integrations/decisions that they now have the burden of supporting.

    2. open source

      So open-source that there is no link to the source code and a web search for this product did not reveal where the source code is hosted.

      They're obviously using this term merely as a marketing term without respect for the actual meaning/principles of open source.

  19. Apr 2020
  20. Mar 2020
    1. This difference is due to the fact that the Cookie Solution automatically excludes from the counting, the pageviews generated by bots.

      It seems that Google Analytics could/would exclude those as well.

    1. a complete snapshot of the user's browser window at that moment in time will be captured, pixel by pixel.

      Is this even technically possible?

      If it were:

      • how are they not disclosing this better, since it seems like a privacy concern since there could be any amount of private data in that form, that would what, get sent to Google??
      • wouldn't that be a lot of pixels (a lot of data to upload), which would take a lot of time to upload, especially at high screen resolutions?
  21. Feb 2020
  22. Jan 2020
  23. Dec 2019
  24. Nov 2019
  25. Oct 2019
    1. But in spite of all these tendencies, Scientific Pedagogy has never yet been definitely constructed nor defined. It is something vague of which we speak, but which does not,[Pg 2] in reality, exist. We might say that it has been, up to the present time, the mere intuition or suggestion of a science which, by the aid of the positive and experimental sciences that have renewed the thought of the nineteenth century, must emerge from the mist and clouds that have surrounded it.

      It is interesting to think about the hugely varying ideas that restrict the existence of a Scientific Pedagogy. Not even those that oppose each other through a research standpoint, but also those that are constrained by religious beliefs.

  26. Sep 2019
  27. Jun 2019
    1. AtthecoreofmyargumentisthewayinwhichGooglebiasessearchtoitsowneconomicinterests—foritsprofitabilityandtobolsteritsmarketdominanceatanyexpense

      I have been trying to avoid the word "money" in my annotations to avoid coming off as anti-capitalist as I really am, but yes: Corporations do not give a care about individuals or marginalized groups outside of how they can profit off of their oppression. Remember this June; this Pride Month; that any company selling you rainbow merchandise is not doing it out of legitimate care about LGBTQ+ rights but because it's profitable! Yes, even if they're giving 20% of proceeds to charity - where do you think the other 80% goes?

  28. Jan 2019
    1. healthy skepticismtoward Cartesian doubt

      lol, but for real, what Barad is suggesting really is difficult to do, or at least I'm finding it difficult to do.

      We believe words are more understandable and apprehensible than the physical world. We believe words are more understandable and apprehensible than the physical world. We believe words are more understandable and apprehensible than the physical world. . .

      It seems crazy because our society is so science and tech driven, but she's right. We believe words to be prior (ontologically) to the world around us because they are a part of "us," our own minds.

      Distorting Descartes's famous thought experiment here seems to help me understand this. While I suspect the average person could be pushed into admitting the possibility of an evil demon spinning an elaborate hoax for you, deceiving your physical senses and tricking your brain, I can't imagine finding anyone who would admit the opposite. The opposite would be that the external world exists largely as you perceive it. The demon is not manipulating your experience of the natural world at all. Instead, he is tricking you into believing you exist.

      We're so Cartesian we can't even conceive of it being otherwise. Perhaps Spinoza would help here, as well as other monist ontologies?

      Someone please redeem this annotation I don't even know what is happening anymore.

  29. Jan 2017
    1. Co-author of Mass and Raw Muscle; former champion body builder and powerlifter.
    2. Associate professor of exercise science - Concordia University; leading authority on bodybuilding and strength training
    3. I should probably start off by telling you my credentials. I'm a professional weight trainer, strength developer, and nationally known educator. I'm also a level-one weight-lifting coach with the United States Weightlifting Federation. I'm a highly sought after personal trainer who coaches football, baseball, and track professionals in addition to many famous athletes and celebrities.